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CERVICAL

CANCER
BY: Princess Grace A. Pechon, SN

CERVICAL
CANCER

Cervical cancer occurs when abnormal cells on the


cervix grow out of control. The cervix is the lower
part of the uterus that opens into the vagina.
Most cervical cancer is caused by a virus called
human papillomavirus, or HPV. You can get HPV
by having sexual contact with someone who has it.
There are many types of the HPV virus.
Not all types of HPV cause cervical cancer. Some of
them cause genital warts, but other types may not
cause any symptoms.

What are the factors that may


raise a woman's risk of
developing cervical cancer?

Human papillomavirus (HPV)


infection.
Immune system deficiency
Herpes
Smoking
Age
Race/Ethnicity
Oral contraceptives
Exposure to diethylstilbestrol
(DES)

Research continues to look into what


factors cause this type of cancer and what
women can do to lower their personal risk.
There is no proven way to completely
prevent this disease, but there may be
steps you can take to lower your cancer
risk. Talk with your doctor if you have
concerns about your personal risk of
developing this type of cancer.

Signs and Symptoms

Blood spots or light bleeding between or


following periods

Menstrual bleeding that is longer and heavier


than usual

Bleeding after intercourse, douching, or a pelvic


examination

Pain during sexual intercourse

Bleeding after menopause

Increased vaginal discharge

Nursing
Interventions:
Cervical Cancer
Listen to the patients fears and concerns, and offer reassurance when
appropriate.
Encourage the patient to use relaxation techniques to promote comfort during
the diagnostic procedures.
Monitor the patients response to therapy through frequent Pap tests and
cone biopsies as ordered.
Watch for complications related to therapy by listening to and observing the
patient.
Monitor laboratory studies and obtain frequent vital signs.

Understand the treatment regimen and verbalize


the need for adequate fluid and nutritional intake to
promote tissue healing.
Explain any surgical or therapeutic procedure to the
patient, including what to expect both before and
after the procedure.
Review the possible complications of the type
therapy ordered.
Remind the patient to watch for and report
uncomfortable adverse reactions.
Reassure the patient that this disease and its
treatment shouldnt radically alter her lifestyle or
prohibit sexual intimacy.
Explain the importance of complying with follow up
visits to the gynecologist and oncologist.

Pain
Kidney failure
Blood clots
Bleeding
Fistula
Vaginal discharge
Palliative care

Cervical Cancer - Medications


Chemotherapy is used to shrink cervical cancer
and decrease tumor growth. It may be used
alone or along with radiation (chemoradiation).
Chemotherapy may be used to treat cervical
cancer that has spread beyond the cervix.

Medicine choices:
Common chemotherapy medicines used to treat
cervical cancer include:
Bevacizumab.
Carboplatin.
Cisplatin. Cisplatin is the medicine most often
used in chemoradiation for cervical cancer.
Docetaxel.
Fluorouracil (5-FU).
Gemcitabine.
Ifosfamide.
Mitomycin.
Paclitaxel.