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Welcom

Division of Negros
23 School First
Congressional

Districts District

1. Canlaon City
2. Vallehermoso
3. La Libertad
4. Jimalalud
Second
5. Tayasan
Congressional
6. Ayungon
District
7. Bindoy
8. Manjuyod
1. Mabinay 1
2. Mabinay 2
3. Pamplona
Third 4. Amlan
Congressional 5. San Jose
District 6. Sibulan

1. Bacong
2. Valencia
3. Dauin
4. Zamboanguita
5. Siaton East
6. Siaton West
7. Sta. Catalina South
8. Sta. Catalina North
9. Basay
Province of Negros Oriental
Basic Information

The third largest island in the Philippines


Became a politico-military province in 1856
A royal decree executed by Gov. General Valerino Weyler on
Jan. 1, 1890 divided the provinces of Negros Oriental and
Negros Occidental
Dumaguete city was made the first capital
Siquijor became a part of Negros Oriental in 1892
Was reorganized by the U.S. and a civil government
established with Demetrio Larena as governor
Was liberated by combined Filipino and American Troops
with the local Negrosanon guerillas attacking the
Japanese on August 6, 1945.
Occupies the South-Eastern half of the island while Negros
Occidental comprise the North Western half.
Has a total land area of 5,402.30 km
Province of Negros Oriental
Basic Information

Topography is characterized by low, grooved mountain ranges


which is mostly lie close to the shoreline
Negros Oriental has a tropical climate with 2 climatic conditions
Is subdivided into 19 municipalities and 6 cities which are
further subdivided into 557 barangays.
Divided into 3 legislative districts, each represented by a
congressman. First district with 2 cities and 7
municipalities Second district with 3 cities and 5
municipalities, third district with 1 city and municipalities
Has a total population of 1,266,666
Population density is 208 persons per sq.km
No. 9 among the 15 poorest provinces in the Philippines and
the only poor province in the Visayas
All municipalities and cities are beneficiaries of the government
4 Ps-Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program
Province of Negros Oriental
Basic Information

Cebuano is the main language of the province, spoken by


95% of the population

In 2012, the province registered as 7.3% malnutrition rate, the


lowest among the provinces in Central Visayas

with 6 community primary hospitals, 5 district hospitals,


1 provincial hospital and 2 private hospitals
Got a 80 M funding assistance from DOH for the new
outpatient department of NOPH which is nearing completion

Created surgical mobile team for free surgical and medical


mission to a total of more than 1 thousand residents
Province of Negros Oriental
Basic Information

350 Brgy Health Scholars, 3,782 Brgy. Health Workers, 40


MHO/CHO/ACHO, 63 Public Health Nurse, 428 Rural
Health Midwives, 56 Rural Sanitary Inspectors, 13 Public
Health Dentist, 13 Dental Aides and 30 Medical
Technologists attending to the health needs 557 barangays
52 new classrooms were completed using solely provincial
government funds
Expanded scholarship coverage of program
800 scholars in various NORSU campuses on top of the
scholars for the school of medicine and allied health courses
Has also added the number of Educators-Co-Mentors from
400 to 543 to address the shortage of teachers
Has 23 school districts with 477 public elementary schools,
and 127 public secondary schools with 17 private
secondary and 20 elementary schools.
Province of Negros Oriental
Basic Information

has 1 state university with 5 expansion campuses, 3 private


universities and 7 Colleges
Province Literacy Rate is 91.43% in 2006
has an average Human Development Index of 0.524
Life expectancy at birth is 68.2 years which is lower by 3.8 years
than the national standard.
Agriculture is the major industry with palay, corn, coconut,
mango and banana as primary crops, livestock raising
which includes carabao, cattle, chicken, duck, goat and
forest industry
Fishing is the main source of income for coastal areas
Negros Oriental is emerging as a technological center in
Central Philippines with its growing business process
outsourcing (BPO) and other technology-related industries.
Notable tourist destination in the Visayas
Province of Negros Oriental
Basic Information

Sources of income are derived from local employment, business


industries and remittances from Negrenses working abroad
Has 60 commercial, government an rural banks
Main transportation are big buses
Has sea ports & domestic airport
All municipalities can be reached through mobile phones,
telephones and even through internet
Powered by Green Core Power Plant previously National Power
Corporation.
Has sufficient supply of potable water in almost all of its
municipalities
Total Internal Revenue Allotment of 1,060,465,608.00
The province ranked 5th among identified top 10 performing
provinces.
EXTERNAL
ASSESSMENT/
ANALYSIS
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES
SOCIAL Third largest island in High risk of Creation of
the truancy and extension
Philippines dropout due to schools
distance and
Occupies half of the terrain from Adoption of
island home to ADM
Land area of 5,402.30 school
sq.km More ALS
More overage learners
children
entering Grade Recipient of
I government
assistance and
intervention
programs
Substandard
infrastructure Maximizing
buildings due local resources
to difficulty of
transporting
materials and
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES
SOCIAL Poverty incidence: High incidence More foreign
45.3% of dropouts, assisted
(year 2012) absenteeism, projects
Total Population: malnutrition
1,266,666 and child labor Chance of
Population Density: government
208 Early marriage intervention
persons per sq.km. programs
Population growth rate:
1.31% (Year 2000-
2010)
number 9 among the
15
poorest provinces in
the
Philippines & the Easier business
poorest in communication
Central Visayas lines
Cebuano is the main
language of the
province
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES

SOCIAL Has a tropical climate Unpredictable Chances for


with 2 climatic climate government
conditions condition assistance

Crop
production
highly affected
resulting to
less food
supply

Hazardous to
safety of
teachers and
learners
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES
SOCIAL 7.3% malnutrition rate, Healthy
the community
lowest among the
provinces
in Central Visayas
More abled
6 - community primary people and
more taxes for
hospitals, the government
5 - district hospitals,
1 - provincial hospital Less
and appreciation
2 - private hospitals for blue More Business
collared job Processing
Literacy rate: 91.43% Outsourcing
(as of 2006) Young growing companies
kids prone to
vices
Average Human
Development Index of Teachers opt New breed of
0.524 to retire before teachers hired
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIE
S
SOCIAL
HEALTH

6 - Government hospitals Insufficient Affordable,


2 - Private Hospitals number of accessible to
21 - Rural Health Units medical most
practitioner
350 - Brgy Health
Scholars, Less access to
3,782 - Brgy. Health health Chances for
Workers, services medical items
40 - MHO/CHO/ACHO, for the province
63 - Public Health Nurse, Poor quality of
428 - Rural Health medical appreciation of
Midwives, services para-medical
56 - Rural Sanitary practitioners
Inspectors,
13 - Public Health Dentist,
13 - Dental Aides and
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNIT
IES
SOCIAL Proportion of urban
population: 33.1
(CY 3013 Monthly update
Neg. Or. Quick Stat)

Poverty Threshold and High poverty Poverty


incidence of the province incidence in Alleviation
was 41.9% in 2009 which the province Program
is above the national compared to - 4Ps recipient
poverty incidence of 22.3% the national
Severity of Poverty
has decreased by 4.2% in
the year 2009

Food Threshold and


Subsistence Incidence
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES
POLITICA Has 3 legislative Different Cong district priority
L districts, each party concerns are
represented by affiliation addressed
a congressman

6 cities & 19
municipalities

All
municipalities Total Increased participation
and cities are dependency and decreased dropout
beneficiaries of
Pantawid
Pamilyang
Pilipino Program
(4Ps)
Unreasonable Expanded health
Recipient of 80 spending service
M funding
assistance from
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES
POLITICA Has created Political Bringing health
L surgical mobile agenda services closer to
team for free people
surgical and
medical mission
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES
POLITICA 52 new Accessibility to school
L classrooms facility afforded to
completed using learners
provincial govt.
funds
Political
Expanded agenda More opportunities for
scholarship poor and deserving
coverage students
program

Increased Shortage of teachers


number of addressed
Educator Co-
Mentors
Accessibility to tertiary
Has 1 State education
University with
5 expansion
campuses, 3
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES
POLITICA 6 Schools Manageable coverage
L Divisions,

Total IRA : Unequal Funding for projects


1,060,465,6 distribution as to
08 priority Justifiable utilization of
programs and resources: People,
projects Physical and Peso
More Business
Fifth among opportunities
the identified
top 10
performing
provinces Local entrepreneurial
practices
One Town
One Product Establish community-
(OTOP ) based local business
environment
FACTOR DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES
S
ECONO Agriculture is the major No support Increase food
MIC industry with Palay, on farm to production
Corn, Coconut, Mango market
and Banana as primary roads
crops
Livestock raising which
include carabao, cattle,
goat, duck & chicken Increase business
Illegal opportunity
With forest industry logging
Decrease
Health and unemployment
Emerging as a wellness of
technological center in people
central Phils. with its
growing BPO and other High
technology-related incidence of
industries prostitution,
broken
families and
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES
ECONOMI Notable tourist More More local revenue
C destination Filipinas generated
marrying
old
foreigners
has 60 more financial and
commercial/govt., and Targets for work opportunities
rural banks robbery and
holdups

Sufficient supply of
potable water
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNITIES

TECHNOLOGIC All municipalities Prone to cyber Easy access to


AL and cities can be crime communication
reached through
mobile phones,
telephones and
even through
internet
Air & water Reduced power
Presence of pollution cost near power
Energy plant
Development Hazardous to
Corporation and health
Green Core
Power Plant High incidence Increase job
Corporation of child labor opportunities

Sugar Mills, Rice


Mills, Stone Craft
Production
FACTORS DATA THREATS OPPORTUNIT
IES
TECHNOLOGICAL Network of Easy access Easy access to
roads for escape of all parts of the
bad elements province

Easy transport
Main of Farm
transportation: products
big busses,
boats, fast ferries
and plane

Has sea ports


and a domestic
airport
INTERNAL
ASSESSMENT
OUR CORE VALUES

27
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 1
29 Private schools : Fast turnover Strong
EVALUATING 5 Preschools of teachers partnership in
SCHOOL 13 Elementary due to the delivery of
DIVISION 17 Secondary Lower salaries education
OUTPUTS than those in services
AND the public
OUTCOMES 477 Public Elem. schools
Schools
127 Public Sec. Disparity on Presence of
Schools the number of schools per
secondary municipality
and
elementary
schools
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 1 Public Elementary: Difficult
Gross Enrolment rate: terrain,
EVALUATING 111.22 insurgency, More effective
SCHOOL Participation Rate: poverty, Balik-eskwela
DIVISION 87.25 hampered campaign and
OUTPUTS 22% of enrollees are some learners Education
AND overage in the elem. to be in Advocacy
OUTCOMES school on
Public Secondary: appropriate
Gross Enrolment Rate: age
63.06
Participation Rate:
41.94
and 33.48% overage in Maximized
the secondary level institutionaliza
tion of
Difficulty of 5 Kindergarten
For SY 2013-14, year old Program
kindergarten enrolment Children from
has increase as a result far flung
of massive education areas to go to
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 1 Graduation rate: Decreasing Increasing
increase of 0.29% in the Transition Graduation,
EVALUATING elem and .79% in sec. Rates for promotion,
SCHOOL elementary cohort and
DIVISION Promotion rate: and completion
OUTPUTS increase of 1.65% Elem secondary rates
AND and 1.83% Sec. levels; high
OUTCOMES dropout rate
Transition rate: against the
decrease of 0.76% elem target of 0.
and 2.48% Sec.

Cohort Survival rate:


increase of 4.37 % Elem
and 1.54% Sec.

Completion rate:
increase of 3.88% and
22.09 Sec.

Dropout rate: average


FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 1
Achievement rate in Achievement Increasing
EVALUATING the NAT Gr. VI in NAT still far academic
SCHOOL increased by 1.89% from the performance in
DIVISION national both elem. and
OUTPUTS Achievement rate in target of 75% sec.
AND the NAT Year IV for sec. and
OUTCOMES increased by 1.93% 85% for elem.
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 1
Profile of Grade 8 If not all Most learners
EVALUATIN enrollees in terms of barangays in grade 8 will
G SCHOOL residence location: have senior go to public
DIVISION (N=14,300 private & high school senior high
OUTPUTS public) then SHS will schools
AND Within the barangay: be
OUTCOMES 42.90% inaccessible
From other Barangay: by most of
42.50% the students
From the Poblacion:
10.17%
From other places:
4.43%
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 1 94.41% of Grade 8 learners Low Teachers will
opted to study in public absorptive become NC 2
EVALUATIN schools while 5.40% opted capacity of qualifiers
G SCHOOL to be in private schools public
DIVISION schools to
OUTPUTS cater the
AND senior high
OUTCOMES 53.89% of grade 8 students school With
want to take Academic Track students available
31.04% on TechVoc, teachers with
13.64% on Sports & Arts Insufficient competence/
Number of specialization
Data of Gr. 8 learners in teachers to
terms for basis for choosing handle the
a track: different High
65.03% - own interest tracks completion
21.98% - parents decision since choice
11.11% - future Incapacity of of track is
employment opportunity parents to based on
1.35%- peer or friends support own interest
interest chosen track
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 2 Out of secondary Presence of Higher
2,056 teachers secondary percentage of
EVALUATING both National and teachers who competent
ORGANIZATIONA locally paid, 32 or need trainings. teachers.
L 1.5% are in the
COMPETENCIES beginning stage in
AND SBM level of
CAPABILITIES practice. 772 or
38% in the
developing stage,
655 or 32% in the
experience stage
and 597 or 29% in
the Expert stage. Lack of items Well
for School functioning
Out of 127 Heads secondary
secondary schools, school heads
51 0r 40% of regardless of
secondary school their positions,
heads, occupy ie. TICs, HTs
Head Teacher / and ESPs/SSPs
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 2 Pupil teacher ratio TPR not Division Level
of 37:1 reflective on TPR is ideal
EVALUATING the school
ORGANIZATIONA level . There
L are still
COMPETENCIES schools with
AND Specialization: 970 high TPR 57% of
CAPABILITIES out of 1697 secondary
secondary school a mismatch school
teachers have on subject teachers with
specialization/ taught and specialization
major specialization
by 10.1 %
Supervisory Competent
position: Out of 17 Lacks PSDS EPSs and
EPS, 5 or 23% Items PSDSs
completed Doctors
degree & 17 have
specialization/major
Out of 20 PSDS, 6
completed Doctors
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 2
Number of Insufficient With initial
EVALUATING secondary teachers teachers with number of
ORGANIZATIONA with specialized specialized teachers
L skills: skills for SHS capable to
COMPETENCIES 409 out of 1697 or handle SHS
AND 24% SHS will be
CAPABILITIES inaccessible to
50.39% of the
No. of public total number
schools that will of schools
offer SHS:
(N= 63 out of 127
Sec. Schs.)
Academic: 33
Techvoc: 60
Sports & Arts: 5
(some schools will
offer 2 or more
tracks)
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 3 121 Master Lack of items: Properly
Teachers 1 & 2 in Teachers, deployed
EVALUATING THE the elementary Master personnel
UTILIZATION OF with a deficit of Teachers,
RESOURCES 270 and a short of school Heads,
306 in the PSDS & ASDS
secondary
Insufficient Most buildings
No. of number of are concrete
Classrooms: classrooms and with
4,800 and furniture; presentable
Requirement: high number of and quality
4,841 dilapidated furniture
Actual Shortage: buildings
731
Excess classrooms
in some schools
cannot offset the
shortages of other
schools due to
their nature of
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 3 For SHS, 283 more Uncertainty of with buildable
classrooms are availability of space and
EVALUATING needed by 63 funds/resource some
THE schools , 11,999 s equipment in
UTILIZATION furniture, 231 SEDIP schools
OF RESOURCES laboratory/shop
rooms

Uncertainty of With future


Identified teacher item grants applicants for
needs of the initial before 2016 the senior high
identified sec. schs. schools
will offer SHS: 432
teachers
Insufficient
funds to Increasing
Total funds for 2012: finance all overall budget
Php . programs and for education
2,914,261,559.84 projects
Fluctuating
SEF allocation
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 4 Organizing: Strong
Restructured implementatio
EVALUATING organization n of RA 9155
MANAGEMENT
PROCESSES Each district has strong linkage
assigned EPS as and
district consultant participation of
all
stakeholders
Bookkeepers and
Disbursing officers
assigned to
different secondary
schools for effective
financial
management
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 4 All schools have Strong
SIP, AIP and APP implementatio
EVALUATING n of RA 9155
MANAGEMENT 98.96%
PROCESSES elementary schools strong linkage
belong to SBM level and
1 participation of
91.38% secondary all
schools belong to stakeholders
SBM level 1 With a high
number of
Out of 127 schools run by
secondary schools TICs, lack of Highly-
59 or 46 % have school head managed
items items schools
regardless of
Out of 477 Fast turn-over position
elementary leading to
schools, 329 or inconsistent
68.97% have items. management
process in
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS

LEVEL 4 Staffing and


Rewarding:
EVALUATING Transparency
MANAGEMENT Created a Division in the
PROCESSES Selection and selection and
Promotion promotion of
Committees and sub- personnel
committee, District
Selection Committee
and School Biases in the
Committee selection Teachers are
process motivated to
Performing teachers perform their
were given due best.
recognition during
Teachers Day
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 4 Regular conduct of Tool not properly Apt tracking of
PAST and PESA validated personnel
EVALUATING performance
MANAGEMENT
PROCESSES Regular evaluation Inadequate 13Schools as
of school self knowledge of APPES
rating on SBM school awardees
levels of practice administrators in
the preparation 2 schools Hall
and of Famer
implementation
of Action
Research
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 5
17 EPSs and 4 Lack of With
EVALUATING division funding for competent
THE 4 coordinators are some special personnel to
MANAGEMENT assigned to handle programs & handle special
FUNCTIONS special programs projects programs &
and projects projects

Some parents Massive


insist to enroll enrolment and
late their balik-eskwela
children campaign
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 5
Number of schools Some Majority of the
EVALUATING with internet hinterland HS Sec. Schs. are
THE 4 connectivity : have no internet
MANAGEMENT Elem: 14 out of electricity & connected and
FUNCTIONS 477 or 2.94% no internet ready to offer
Sec.: 101 out of connection ICT for SHS
127 or 79.53%
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 6 Regular conduct of Well informed
Executive Conference for personnel
EVALUATING all personnel , Teacher
TEAMS AND Induction Program for
INDIVIDUALS newly hired teachers,
weekly conference of all
division office personnel
PES open to Highly
PES (Elem) Out of 3598 biases in performing
teachers 2 or 0.05% rating teaching and
rated US, 11 or 0.31% non-teaching
rated S, 3583 or 99.58% personnel
VS and 2 or .05% rated based on PES
O
PBB
PES (Sec.) Out of 1361, incongruence
3 or .22% rated S, 1352 with the
or 99.63% rated VS and individual
2 or .15% rated O performance
based on PES
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 7
Classroom Excess With
EVALUATING Shortage: classrooms, remarkable
PHYSICAL Kinder & Elem.- 475 WATSAN buildable
FACILITIES AND Secondary- 256 cannot offset spaces
SET-UP, the shortage
WORKING Water & Most building
CONDITIONS Sanitation Most s are
AND Shortage: classrooms permanent
ENVIRONMENTA Kinder & Elem: need repair
L 1244
SURROUNDINGS Secondary: 492

Furniture
Shortage: Slow speed
Kinder & Elem: in internet
20,311 connection
Secondary: 1,331 Easy access to
information
Most Secondary and
schools have communicatio
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS

LEVEL 7

EVALUATING 50% of Grade 8 Incapacity of Increase


PHYSICAL learners are most parents parental
FACILITIES AND commuting to school to finance engagement
SET-UP, everyday needs of
WORKING children
CONDITIONS
AND
ENVIRONMENTA
L
SURROUNDINGS
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS

LEVEL 8
Tendency of Available local
EVALUATING schools to industries,
ORGANIZATION become alliances,
AL dependent of linkages and
AFFILIATIONS dole outs affiliations
ALLIANCES AND
LINKAGES
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS
LEVEL 8 Affiliations:
BSP, GSP, Uncertain aid Resource
EVALUATING Philhealth, PagIBIG sustainability Assistance
ORGANIZATION
AL Linkages:
AFFILIATIONS EDC, LGU, Phil.
ALLIANCES AND Army, Lending
LINKAGES Institutions,
Corporate
Foundations:
Coca-cola, Pepsi,
Shell, Petron,
SMART, Globe,
SACEDA, etc.
Alliances:
CHED, TESDA, TEIs,
HEIs, ABK
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS

LEVEL 9
Outstanding Lack of Highly
EVALUATING leadership of SDS actually- competent
LEADERSHIP per CESPES working ASDS leader
Evaluation considering
the size of the
division.
FACTORS DATA WEAKNESS STRENGTHS

LEVEL 10
100% of regular Transparency Systems are in
EVALUATING teachers are full- problem of placed;
STRATEGIC FIT time school heads strategies
OR VSOP on Fiscal applied are at
CONSISTENCY Management work in field

Vision, Strategy,
Organizational
Structures and School Heads
People and teachers
Competencies need training
(VSOP) on fiscal
management
STRENGTHS:
1. Strong partnership with all
stakeholders
2. Presence of schools per municipality
3. Increased Literacy rate
4. Functional ADM
5. Higher Percentage of competent
teachers
6. Ideal Division TPR
7. Presence of SST with specialization
8. Competent EPS and PSDS
9. Properly deployed personnel
10. Increasing overall National budget for
education
WEAKNESSES
1. Fast turnover of teachers in the private schools.
2. Disparity on the number of secondary and elementary
schools
3. Difficult terrain, insurgency, poverty, hampered some
learners to be in school on appropriate age
4. Difficulty of 5 year old children from flung areas to go
to school
5. Decreasing transition rates for elementary and
secondary levels ; high dropout rate against the
target of 0.
6. Achievement in NAT still far from the national target
of 75% for sec. and 85% for the elem.
7. If not all barangays have senior high school then SHS
will be inaccessible by most of the students.
8. Low absorptive capacity of public schools to cater the
seniror high school students
9. Insufficient number of teachers to handle the
different tracks for SHS.
WEAKNESSE
Sof items: Teachers,
13. Lack MTs, SH, PSDS & ASDS
14.Insufficient number of classrooms and furniture,
high number
of dilapidated buildings
15. Uncertainty of availability of funds/resources
16. Insufficient funds to finance all programs and
projects
17. Fluctuating SEF allocation
18.Fast turn-over leading to inconsistent
management process in
some schools
19. Biases in the selection process
20. Passive attitude of parents on early enrolment
21. Some hinterland HS have no electricity and no
internet
connection
OPPORTUNITIES:
1. Creation of extension schools
2. Utilization of local resources
3. More foreign assisted projects
4. Chance of government intervention
programs
5. Easier business communication lines
6. Healthy community
7. More business processing outsourcing
companies
8. Chances for medical items for the
province appreciation
of para medical practitioners
9. Poverty Alleviation Program (4 Ps
OPPORTUNITIES:
12. Accessibility to school facility
afforded to
learners
13. More scholarship opportunities
for poor and
deserving students
14. Accessibility to tertiary education
15. More business and employment
opportunities
16. Local entrepreneurial practices
17. Increase food production
18. Decrease unemployment
THREATS
1. High risk of truancy and dropout due to distance and
terrain from home to
school
2. More overage children entering Grade I
3.Substandard infrastructure buildings due to difficulty
of transporting materials and M&E
4.High incidence of absenteeism, malnutrition and child
labor
5.Unpredictable climate condition
6.Less appreciation for blue collared job
7.Young growing kids prone to vices
8. Insufficient number of medical practitioner
9. Poor quality of medical services
10. High poverty incidence in the province compared to
the national
11. Political agenda
12. Unequal distribution as to priority programs and
projects
STRENGTHS TO EXPLOIT OPPORTUNITIES
1) Strong partnership with all stakeholders
2) Presence of schools per municipality S
3) Increased Literacy rate T
4) Functional ADM
5) Higher Percentage of competent teachers R
6) Ideal Division TPR E
7) Presence of SST with specialization
8) Competent EPS and PSDS
N
IA 9) Properly deployed personnel G
10) Increasing overall National budget for T
education
H
EA 11) Maximized utilization of available resources
12) Highly- managed schools regardless of S
position

1. Creation of extension schools


2. Utilization of local resources O
3. More foreign assisted projects P 1. Well implemented Programs
4. Chance of government intervention programs
5. Easier business communication lines P and Projects
6. Healthy community O
7. More business processing outsourcing
companies R
8. Chances for medical items for the province T
appreciation of para medical practitioners
9. Poverty Alleviation Program (4 Ps recipient) U
10. Congressional district priority concerns areN
addressed
11. Expanded health service I
12. Accessibility to school facility afforded to T
learners
13. More scholarship opportunities for poor and I
deserving students E
14. Accessibility to tertiary education
15. More business and employment opportunities S
16. Local entrepreneurial practices
Table 1. HOW DO WE OVERCOME WEAKNESSES TO
EXPLOIT OPPORTUNITIES
1. Fast turnover of teachers in the private schools.
W
2. Disparity on the number of secondary and elementary
schools E
3. Difficult terrain, insurgency, poverty, hampered some
learners to be in school on A
appropriate age K
4. Difficulty of 5 year old children from flung areas to go
IA to school N
5. Decreasing transition rates for elementary and E
secondary levels ; high dropout rate
against the target of 0. S
6. Achievement in NAT still far from the national target ofS
75% for sec. and 85% for the elem.
7. If not all barangays have senior high school then SHSE
EA will be inaccessible by most of the students. S
8. Low absorptive capacity of public schools to cater the
senior high school students
9. Insufficient number of teachers to handle the different
tracks for SHS.
O 10.Incapacity of parents to support chosen track of
P learners
11.Presence of secondary teachers who need trainings
P 12.TPR not reflective on the school level .
O
1. Creation of extension schools
2. Utilization of local resources R 1. Open a Secondary school in every
3. More foreign assisted projects
T barangay (W2 vs. O1)
4. Chance of government intervention programs
5. Easier business communication lines U
6. Healthy community
N 2. Strengthen linkage and partnership with
7. More business processing outsourcing
companies I all stakeholders to improve delivery of
8. Chances for medical items for the province
appreciation of para medical T education services
practitioners ( W3,4,5,6 vs. O3,4,7,10,12,13,19)
9. Poverty Alleviation Program (4 Ps recipient) I
10.Congressional district priority concerns are E
addressed
11.Expanded health service S
12.Accessibility to school facility afforded to
Table 2. HOW DO WE OVERCOME WEAKNESSES TO
EXPLOIT OPPORTUNITIES
13. Lack of items: Teachers, MTs, SH, PSDS & ASDS
W
14. Insufficient number of classrooms and
furniture, high number of dilapidated E
buildings A
15.Uncertainty of availability of funds/resources
IA 16.Insufficient funds to finance all programs and K
projects N
17.Fluctuating SEF allocation
E
18.Fast turn-over leading to inconsistent management
process in some schools S
19.Biases in the selection process
20.Passive attitude of parents on early enrolment S
EA 21.Some hinterland HS have no electricity and no E
internet connection
22.Incapacity of most parents of finance needs of S
children
23.Tendency of schools to become dependent of dole
outs
O 24.Transparency problem of school heads of fiscal
P management

1. Creation of extension schools P


2. Utilization of local resources
O
3. More foreign assisted projects 1.Provide access by opening schools
4. Chance of government intervention programs R
5. Easier business communication lines T
to densely populated hinterlands
6. Healthy community
7. More business processing outsourcing U (W 1-6 vs. T1,2,4)
companies N
8. Chances for medical items for the province
appreciation of para medical I 2. Offer Senior High School in
practitioners T every barangay (W7,8,9,10,11,12,vs.
9. Poverty Alleviation Program (4 Ps recipient)
10. Congressional district priority concerns areI T 7,13,14)
addressed E
11. Expanded health service
12. Accessibility to school facility afforded to S
learners
How do we use strengths to counteract
threats?
1. Strong partnership with all stakeholders
2.Presence of schools per municipality
W
3.Increased Literacy rate E
4.Functional ADM A
5.Higher Percentage of competent teachers K
6.Ideal Division TPR
N
7.Presence of SST with specialization
8.Competent EPS and PSDS E
IA 9.Properly deployed personnel
10.Increasing overall National budget for
S
S
education
E
EA 11.Maximized utilization of available resources
12.Highly- managed schools regardless of S
position

1. High risk of truancy and dropout due to


distance and terrain from home to school
2. More overage children entering Grade I
3. Substandard infrastructure buildings due to 1.Increased school performance
difficulty of transporting materials and M&E (S1 vs. T1,2,3,4,7,12,13,14,15,16)
4. High incidence of absenteeism, malnutrition
and child labor
T 2.Improved Medical Services
5. Unpredictable climate condition H (S1 vs. T8,9)
6. Less appreciation for blue collared job R
7. Young growing kids prone to vices 3.Healthy and safe environment
8. Insufficient number of medical practitionerE (S1,12 vs. T13,-16)
9. Poor quality of medical services A
10.High poverty incidence in the province T 4.Equitable distribution of resources
compared to the national
S (S 10,11 vs. T12)
11.Political agenda
12.Unequal distribution as to priority programs
and projects
13.High incidence of prostitution, broken
families and underemployment
14.Prone to cyber crime
OBJECTIVES
1) Increase participation rate. (REACH)
2) Reduce dropout rate & Increase Retention
Rate (RESPONSIVENESS)
3) Increase academic performance. ( RATINGS)
4) Produce K to 12 graduates who are either
ready to college or to be employed.
(RETURNS)
5) Establish Public Private Partnership
(REVENUES)
6) Institutionalized and sustained the
operations of SBM Systems (RECOGNITION)
We dream of Filipinos
OUR VISION
who passionately love their country
and whose competencies and values
enable them to realize their full
potential
and contribute meaningfully to
building the nation.

As a learner-centered public
institution,
the Department of Education
continuously improves itself
to better serve its stakeholders.
63
OUR MISSION
To protect and promote the right of every
Filipino to quality, equitable, culture-based,
and complete basic education where:
> Students learn in a child-friendly, gender-
sensitive, safe, and
motivating environment

> Teachers facilitate learning and constantly


nurture every learner

> Administrators and staff, as stewards of the


institution, ensure an
enabling and supportive environment for
effective learning
64
KRA 1 - REACH
Increase
ELEMENTARY
participation
EFA
rate
2012
2016 TARGETS
PERFORMANCE
Gaps
INDICATORS Target Accomplishm 2013 2014
s ents 2015-
- -
2016
2014 2015
Gross 11.7 114. 117.
122.93 111.22 120.50
Enrolment Rate 1 64 57
SECONDARY
Net Enrolment
100.00 87.25
12.7 90.4 93.6
96.82
Rate 5 4 3
EFA
2012 TARGETS
2016
PERFORMANCE
Gaps 2014
INDICATORS Target Accomplishm 2013- 2015-
-
s ents 2014 2016
2015
Gross 52.7 89.4 102.6
115.79 63.06 76.24
Enrolment Rate 3 2 1
Net Enrolment 41.94 51.3 77.0
93.33 64.24 89.94
Rate 9 9
KRA 2 - RESPONSIVENESS
Reduce dropout rate
TARGETS
EFA
2012
PERFORMANCE 2016 Gap 2015
INDICATORS s 2013- 2014-
-
Target Accomplishm 2014 2015
2016
s ents
ELEMENTARY
Completion 80.0
Rate
82.52 72.55 9.97 75.05 77.55
5
Cohort 11.8 83.7
Survival Rate
86.76 74.93 77.88 80.83
3 8
School Leaver
Rate
1.01 6.08 5.07 4.81 3.54 2.27

Dropout Rate 1.01 1.05 0.04 1.04 1.03 1.02


SECONDARY
Completion 100.0 29.8 92.5
Rate
70.20 77.65 8.51
0 0 5
Cohort 10.8 81.1
83.90 73.02 75.74 78.46
KRA 3 - RATINGS
Increase academic performance
ELEMENTARY
TARGETS
PERFORMANC EFA
E INDICATORS
2012 Gaps
2016 2013- 2014- 2015-
2014 2015 2016

Achievement
Rate
Overall 85.00 74.29 10.71 76.97 79.65 82.33
English 85.00 72.52 12.48 75.64 78.76 81.88
Filipino 85.00 73.97 11.03 76.73 79.49 82.25
Science 85.00 73.14 11.86 76.11 70.08 82.05
Math 85.00 76.62 8.38 78.72 80.82 82.92
HEKASI 85.00 75.20 9.80 77.70 80.20 82.70
KRA 3 - RATINGS
Increase academic
SECONDARY performance
TARGETS
EFA
2012
PERFORMAN 2016
CE Gaps 2013 2015
2014-
INDICATORS - -
Target Accomplishm 2015
2014 2016
s ents

Achievement
Rate
Overall 75.00 53.81 21.19 59.1 64.4 69.
1 1 71
English 75.00 58.14 16.86 62.3 66.5 70.8
6 8 0
Filipino 75.00 58.49 16.51 62.6 66.7 70.8
2 5 8
Araling
KRA 4 - RETURNS
Produce K to 12 graduates who are
either ready to college or to be
2018 employed. TARGETS
PERFORMANCE Ga 2018 2019
INDICATORS Target Accomplishm ps 2017
- -
s ents 2018
2019 2020
Percentage of K 75.00 75.00
to 12 graduates
who specialize
Tec-voc Programs

75.00 75.00
Percentage of K
to 12 with NC
certificate
KRA 5 - REVENUES
Establish linkages between
schools
and
PERFORMANCE
2016stakeholders.
Gap
TARGETS
INDICATORS Target Accomplishme s 2015- 2016- 2017-
s nts 2016 2017 2018
Number of school-
based linkages
establish by
school per year
KRA 6 - RECOGNITION
Improve the SBM Level of
practice of schools from Level 1
to higher levels
EFA
2012 TARGETS
2016
PERFORMANCE Gap
INDICATORS s
2013
Targe Accomplishme 2014- 2015-
-
ts nts 2015 2016
2014

Number of
schools Level III
of SBM practices
STRATEGIES,
PROGRAMS,
TASKS,
RESOURCES
SPATRES
INCREASE PARTICIPATION RATE
RESOURCES
STRATEGIE PROGRAM ACTIVITIE
TASKS PHYSICA
S S S PEOPLE PESO
L
1. Child Oplan Campaign Linking SHs, Campaign MOOE and
find Balik- through : with teachers, materials donations
Eskwela Media, stake- learners, EBEIS from
Streamers holders parents, Early stake-
& Pulong stake- Enrolment holders
pulong sa Conduc holders forms,
barangay, t family MOA
home visits mappin
g
Track
2. Inclusive Early Enrolling SHs, Campaign School/loca
Inclusion education Registration all teachers, materials l MOOE
of all Coordinatio pupils/st learners, EBEIS Early
n with other udents parents, Enrolment
children in line regardle stake- forms, MOA
the basic agencies ss of holders
education abilities
and
capabilit
ies
SPATRES
INCREASE PARTICIPATION RATE
RESOURCES
STRATEGI PROGRA ACTIVIT
TASKS PEOPL PHYSICA
ES MS IES PESO
E L
4. Adopt-a- Tap for Providin SHs, School Local
Maximizin school donors g school teacher Supplies School
g use of supplies s, MOOE
Education and learner
resources other s,
educatio parents
nal , stake-
material holders
s
5. Student Interest Identifyi SHs, School Local
Intensify Governm groupings ng the teacher facilities School
school ent multiple s, MOOE
organizati intellige learner
ons nce of s,
students parents
,
SPATRES
DECREASE DROPOUT RATE & INCREASE
RETENTION RATE RESOURCES
STRATEGI PROGRA ACTIVITI
TASKS PHYSIC
ES MS ES PEOPLE PESO
AL
1. DORP Orientation Technica School Heads Modules MOOE
Advocacy & Trainings, l Teachers &
Reproductio Assistan Students with
n of ce ADM
modules to
recipient
schools
2. Orientation Data DORP , SBM Training SBM
E-SARDO DORP E-SARDO gatherin Coordinator, materials funds
Tracking Data g PO, DORP & Laptops
Gathering ICT Internet
Coordinators, connectio
SH n
3. Modul ADM ADM Identific DORP , SBM ADM National/
ar MISOSA guidelines ation of Coordinator, Guideline local
/ Home OHSP impleme School Heads Modules funds
Home nting Students/pupi
study Study schools ls
SPATRES
DECREASE DROPOUT RATE & INCREASE
RETENTION RATE RESOURCES
STRATEGI PROGRA ACTIVITI
TASKS PEOPLE PHYSIC PESO
ES MS ES
AL
4. School DORP Home Technical Teachers , Visitation Local
Initiated visits Assistance Guidance tool funds
Interventi Counselors &
School Heads
ons
5. Adopt-a- FGD Identify School Letters, Local
Linkage School and link Heads, DORP brochures funds
with needs of Coordinators
schools to
internal external
and stakeholder
external s
stakehold
ers
ALS Dropouts Technical Teachers, SH, Document Local
from Assistance ALS & DORP s funds
formal Coordinators
school
transferre
d to ALS
SPATRES
RESOURCES
INCREASE ACADEMIC
STRATEGIE PROGRAM
S S
ACTIVITI
ES
TASKS
PEOPL PHYSIC PESO
PERFORMANCE E AL

1. Close NAT Classroom Observatio Instructio Observati Local


supervisio Observatio n, nal on MOOE
n of ns Monitoring Leaders sheets,
, follow-up
teachers Mentoring
2. INSET Training School- Teachers, Training School
Capability based SH, EPS, Design MOOE
Building training PSDS

3. NAT Analyzing Listing of Teachers COR


Identificat of results of least and SH, Certificat School
ion of test results learned e of MOOE
skills Rating
least
learned
competen
cies
SPATRES
INCREASE ACADEMIC
PERFORMANCE
STRATEGIE PROGRA ACTIVITI
RESOURCES
TASKS PEOPLE PHYSICAL PESO
S MS ES

4. Time on Intensive Submissio Teachers Class School


Maximizin Task supervision n of & School program MOOE
g contact classroom Heads
program
hours with
students
5. Unified Periodic Testing Making of Teachers, Test Local
Testing Test unified School materials MOOE
test Heads,
questions PSDS,
EPS

6. M&E FGD, Technical Teachers, Observatio School/lo


Feedbacki Observatio assistance School n Sheets cal MOOE
ng ns Heads,
PSDS, EP
7. NAT Off hours Making of Teachers, Review School
Intensive review parallel School materials MOOE
SPATRES
PRODUCE K TO 12 GRADUATES WHO
ARE EITHER READY TO COLLEGE OR TO
RESOURCES
BE EMPLOYED
STRATE
GIES
PROGRA ACTIVIT
MS IES
TASKS
PEOPLE PHYSICAL PESO

Advocacy GASTPE Campaign Technical EPS Supplies & Local


Assistan Private SH materials MOOE
ce transportatio
n
Recognitio Evaluation, Technical EPS Documents Private
n of validation Assistan Private SH School
Private of ce Inspection Funds
Schools documents Team
Senior FGD Technical Private IRR on RA Private
High Assistan School 10355 School
School ce Administr Funds
ator &
owners
Senior Assessment Technical EPS Documents Local &
High of facilities Assistan Private SH Private
School & Human ce Inspection funds
Resources Team
SPATRES
Establish Public Private RESOURCES
STRATEGIE PROGRA ACTIVITI TASKS
Partnership
S MS ES
PEOPLE PHYSIC
AL
PES
O

1. Advocacy Adopt a- Situational Information SDS, Document Local


School Analysis disseminati ASDS, s Fund
on of PO, EPS, Program s
DepED Div. PSDS, SH of Work
Of Neg Or. Project
proposals
2. Adopt-a- Orientations Invitations, SDS, Document Local
Involvement of School & Workshop Meetings, ASDS, s, Fund
Stakeholders Senior High FGD PO, EPS, Presentati s
in DepED School PSDS, SH ons,
Strategic Plan Project
Proposals
3. Adopt-a- Recognition Programs, SDS, Certificate Local
Acknowledgem School Giving of ASDS, s, Plaques funds
ent/ Certificate EPS,
Recognition of of PSDS,
Assistance recognition SH, DO
provided personne
SPATRES
IMPROVE SBM LEVEL OF PRACTICE OF
SCHOOLS TO HIGHER LEVELS RESOURCES
STRATEGI PROGRA ACTIVITI
TASKS PHYSIC
ES MS ES PEOPLE PESO
AL
1. SBM Conferenc Determi EPS, PSDS DepED SBM
Advocacy Assessme e ne levels SH both Order 83 MOOE
nt Workshop of Elem.& s. 2012
for EPS & practice H.S. & 20,
PSDS 2013

2. SBM Focused Feedbac EPS, PSDS DepED SBM


Coaching Assessme Group k SH both Order 83 MOOE
& nt Discussion Session elem.& s. 2012
Mentoring H.S. & 20,
2013
3. INSET SBM Technical Data SBM Supplies SBM
Assessme Assistance Gatherin Coord. & & MOOE
nt & g& Task Force Materials
accreditat Utilizatio School Transport
ion n Heads & ation
SPATRES
IMPROVE SBM LEVEL OF PRACTICE
OF SCHOOLS TO
STRATEGIE PROGRAM ACTIVITIE
HIGHER
TASKS
LEVELS
RESOURCES
PEOPLE PHYSICA PESO
S S S
L

4. Validation School Validate School M&E SBM


Monitoring of Data & visits report Heads & Templates MOOE
& Accreditat Stakehol
Evaluation ion ders, Monthly
SBM reports
Team
5. SBM Best Prepare Docume SBM Supplies & SBM
Sustainabilit Practices SBM ntation Team materials MOOE
y of SBM portfolio Compilatio
practices n of
document
ary
evidence
Senior High School Data
Who are our learners?
Grade 7 students of SY 2012-13 will be the first Gr
11 students in 2016-17. They are now in Grade 8.

SY 2016 SY 2017
84
Based on 2012 enrollment data, 93 %
of HS students are in public schools

85
Based on 2012 enrollment data, 93%
& only 7% % of HS students are in
public schools

Public Enrolment: 51,881


Private Enrolment: 3,724

Types of Schools:
a) Schools with no Annex -
b) Schools with Annex
c) Schools with Special
Programs: 2
d) Schools with TechVoc
Curricula:

86
Actual and Projected Enrollment for Region VII,
NEGROS ORIENTAL, Negros Oriental
Actual and Projected Enrollment for Region VII,
NEGROS ORIENTAL, Negros Oriental
By 2017, Division of Negros Oriental should
expect around 16,083 Grade 7 students in
both public and private secondary schools
Track Preference
Public Secondary Schools who will
offer SHS Track
Cong. Academi Tech. Sports No. of
District c Voc & Arts Schools

First 12 14 5 14
Second 10 19 2 20
Third 19 23 8 29
Total 41 56 15 63
Percent
65% 89% 24%
age
Track Preference
Specific Strand Preference -
ACADEMIC No. of School/s per
Academic
Public Congressional
Secondary Schools whoDistrict
will TOTA
offer SHS
Strands L
First Second Third

Business 1 1 4 6
Humanities 1 0 0 1
Education 8 9 14 31
Social
1 0 1 2
Science
Science Tech. 1 2 10 13
Engineering 0 0 3 3
Math 1 0 5 6
ACADEMIC PREFERENCES
Specific Strand Preference TECH/VOC
Public Secondary Schools who will offer SHS
No. of School/s per
Congressional District
Tech-Voc-
First Second Third
Live Total
Strands

Garment 4 7 5 16
Food Tech 11 12 14 37
Beauty Care 4 5 8 17
Hotel, Resort,
etc.
1 0 9 10
Care giving 0 2 1 3
Mechanical
Techno.
5 4 6 15
Civil Technology 1 3 10 14
Electrical Tech. 4 3 5 12
TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL
PREFERENCES
Specific Strand Preference ARTS & SPORTS
Public Secondary Schools who will offer SHS
No. of School/s per
Congressional District
Arts &
First Second Third
Sports Total
Strands

Theater
0 0 1 1
Arts
Visual Arts 0 0 1 1
Dance 2 0 1 3
Sports 2 2 6 10
ARTS & SPORTS PREFERENCES
Identified Needs
Public Secondary Schools who will
offer SHS Laborat
Cong. Teacher Classroo Furnitu ory
District s ms re /Shop
Rooms
First 130 69 3,993 66
Second 193 118 5,357 81
Third 208 167 6,611 134
15,96
Total 531 354 281
1