You are on page 1of 24

I.

INTRODUCTION

The group members:


1. Vn Phi Long
2. Trn Cng Khang
3. Phan Th Hu
4. T Th Thanh Huyn
5. H Th Lan Hng
6. Vn Thi Hong
I. INTRODUCTION
The task for each member:
I. Introduction
presented by Van Phi Long

II. Summary
A. design.
B. Assumption
presented by Tran Cong Khang and Pham Thi Hue

III. Method/ Approach Evaluation.


A. Strengths and weakness
presented by Ta Thi Thanh Huyen

III. Method/ Approach Evaluation.


B. Teachers connection with the method
C. Students connection with the method
presented by Van Thai Hoang and Ho Thi Lan Huong
I. INTRODUCTION

The topic of the presentation:

TOTAL PHYSICAL RESPONSE


SUMMARY

Total Physical Response (TPR) is a language teaching


method built around the coordination of speech and action;
it attempts to teach language through physical (motor)
activity.

TPR reflects a grammar-based view of language. James


Asher states that most of the grammatical structure of the
target language and hundreds of vocabulary items can be
learnt from the skillful use of the imperative by the instructor.
SUMMARY
A. DESIGN:

1. Goal:
The general objective of Total Physical Response are to
teach oral proficiency at a beginning level. Comprehension is
a means to an end, and the ultimate aim is to teach basic
speaking skills. A TPR course aims to produce learners who
are capable of uninhibited communication that is intelligible
to a native speaker. Specific instructional objectives are not
elaborated, for these will depend on the particular needs of the
learners. Whatever goals are set, however, must be attainable
the use of action-based drills in the imperative form.
SUMMARY
A. DESIGN:

2. Syllabus model:

The syllabus is predictable from exercises used in


the class: A sentence-based syllabus with
grammatical and lexical criteria being primary in
selecting teaching items.

TPR requires initial attention to meaning rather than


to the form of items. Grammar is thus taught
inductively.
SUMMARY
A. DESIGN:

3. Teachers Role:
The teacher plays an active and direct role in TPR. It is the teacher
who decides what to teach, who models and presents the new
materials, and who selects supporting materials for classroom use.
The teachers role is not so much to teach as to provide
opportunities for learning. The teacher has responsibility of
providing the best kind of exposure to language so that the learner
can internalize the basic rules of the target language. Thus the
teacher controls the language input the learners receive, providing
the raw material for the cognitive map that learners will
construct in their own minds. The teacher should also allow
speaking abilities to develop in learners at the learners own natural
pace.
SUMMARY
A. DESIGN:

4. Students Role:
Learners in TPR have the primary roles of listener and
performer. They listen attentively and respond physically to
commands given by the teacher. Learners are also expected to
recognize and respond to novel combinations of previously
taught items. They are required to produce novel combinations
of their own. Learners monitor and evaluate their own
progress. They are encouraged to speak when they feel ready
to speak- that is, when sufficient basis in the language has
been internalized.
SUMMARY
A. DESIGN:

5. Role of L1:
The mother tongue is only used as a guide helping learners
know how to do the task. And, the meaning will be clearer while
they are performing the task through non-verbal cues.
SUMMARY
A. DESIGN:
6. Characteristics/ principles:
Listening ability and vocabulary must be developed first
There must not be any stress in the class
Regular repetition
Action verbs are the core of TPR
TPR is also a technique of teaching vocabulary
No forcing but exploit the students errors for exposing others
structure points
Expose the nature use of language
Create an artificial English community in the classroom
The more often we trace memory and the more intensively we
repeat, the stronger the memory associations are and the more
likely it will be recalled
SUMMARY
A. DESIGN:

7. Role of instrumental materials:


Materials and realia play an increasing role, however, in later
learning stages. For absolute beginners, lessons may not require
the use of materials, since the teachers voice, actions and
gestures may be sufficient basis for classroom activities. Later,
the teacher may use common classroom objects, such as books,
pens, cups, furniture. As the course develop, the teacher will need
to make or collect supporting materials to support teaching
points. These may conclude pictures, realia, slides, and word
charts.
SUMMARY
A. DESIGN:
8. Types of teaching and learning activities:
Imperative drills are the major classroom. They are
typically used to elicit physical actions and activity
on the part of the learners. Conversational dialogues
are delayed until after about 120 hours of instruction.
Other class activities include role plays and slide
presentations. Role plays center on everyday
situations, such as at the restaurant, supermarket, or
gas station.
Reading and writing activities may also be employed
to further consolidate structures and vocabulary, and
as follow-ups to oral imperative drills.
SUMMARY
B. Assumption:
1. The nature of language:
- The grammar based view:
+ Most of the grammatical structures of the target language
and a lot of vocabulary items can be learnt from the skillful use of
the imperative performed by the teacher.
+ Verbs especially verbs in the imperative are viewed as the
central linguistic motif to organize learning activities.
- The stimulus response view:
+ provide the learning theory underlying language teaching
pedagogy.
+ be linked to the "trace theory" of memory in psychology.

(Richards & Rodgers, 2001, p73)


SUMMARY
B. Assumption:

2. The nature of language learning:


TPR is drawn on three learning hypothesis:
- There exists a specific innate bio-program for language
learning which defines an optimal path for L1 & L2
development.
- Brain lateralization defines different learning functions in the
left and right brain hemispheres.
- Stress intervenes between the act of learning and what is to be
learnt; the lower the stress, the greater the learning.

(Richards & Rodgers, 2001, p74)


II.METHOD/APPROACH
Evaluation StatementEVALUATION
A.A.Strengthens and
STRENGTHENS AND Weaknesses
WEAKNESSES

1. Strengthens.
- TPR minimizes stress by focusing on meaning interpreted
through movement, rather than on language forms studied in
the abstract.
- TPR makes input comprehensible by performing physical
actions in the target language.
- TPR increases the possibility of successful recall through
combined tracing activities.

(C. Richards & S. Rodgers. 2001)


II. Evaluation Statement
METHOD/APPROACH EVALUATION
A. Strengthens
A. STRENGTHENS and
AND WEAKNESSES

2. Weaknesses.
Weaknesses
- It can be a challenge for shy students.
- It is quite difficult to teach abstract vocabularies or
expressions with TPR.
- This method is only suitable for beginners classes, where it
is clear that TPR is suitable for children at the lower level
because of the target language lends itself in the activities.

(C. Richards & S. Rodgers. 2001)


II.METHOD/APPROACH
Evaluation StatementEVALUATION
B.B. Your connection
Your connection with the method
with method.

TPR method is very realistic for our future teaching


situation.
- Demand of communication
- The need of learning a foreign language
- We combine with various methods to adapt students
with different level.
- Direct method/ structural translation method.

This method really matches our teaching philosophy.


- Learn to know more
- Learn to communicate
- Learn to be mature
TPR to my personality
Conduct organizational skill.
Reduce the tension.
Do the physical movement to
display the content.
Control the language input the
learners receive.

Benefits of TPR activities:


body movement: help students
understand and remember new
vocabulary.
Comprehension is confirmed by
the capability of saying and
acting out the word.
Vocabulary and grammar
teaching can be extended via
TPR.
The practical
application of total
physical respond (tpr)

1 2 3 4

Proficien Class size: Culture:


Age:
20
11 - 12 cy: - Obtain native
language.
elementa
- Communicate
ry in everyday
situations.
SAMPLE LESSON: ACTION
VERBS
COOK
DRINK
JUMP