Thursday March 23rd 2017

• Pick up your spirals/folders from the front, take out a pen/pencil
and your bellwork.

• Also, pick up a guided note packet at the front table.

• We are taking notes over US Sectionalism (Road to the Civil War)
today.

• Bellwork: What issues would make a country divide into sections?
• Can be past/present issues.

• For Friday, write no bellwork.
Sub Announcement for tomorrow
• I have to take a test and will be gone.

• You will work on the map First (for a grade).

• Then you will do the crossword.
• This will be a replacement classwork grade for a 70 if complete.
• This will not cover the map. If you don’t do the map = 0.

• Everything will be collected at the end of the class period.

• Best behaved class gets candy!
Sectional
ism
Compromise of
1850
• Support: Congressmen Henry Clay and Daniel Webster

• Oppose: Southerners – afraid of losing power in legislative branch

1. California enters the Union as a free state
2. New territories will use popular sovereignty to determine slave or
free
3. Slave trade is outlawed in Washington D.C.
4. Fugitive Slave Act
Compromise
Video!
Fugitive Slave Act
• Law: required the return of runaway slaves

• Free African Americans could be sent South if someone claimed to be their
owner

• Fugitives have no right to a trial by jury or to testify in their own defense

• Federal officials were paid a bounty (money) for each fugitive
Uncle Tom’s Cabin
• Written by Harriet Beecher Stowe

• Fictional account of the evils and cruelty of slavery

• Sold thousands of copies; increased support
for abolition
Kansas-Nebraska
Act
• Created Kansas and Nebraska territories

• Repealed the 36 30’ line from the Missouri Compromise

• Growing number of settlers will use popular sovereignty to determine slave or free
Bleeding Kansas
• Pro vs. Anti-slavery forces fight over Kansas for years (John Brown leads Anti-slavery)

• Settlers from both sides poured into Kansas to decide the slavery issue (popular sovereignty)

• Voter fraud in elections leads to bloodshed and destruction
Monday March 27th 2017.
• Pick up your spirals/folders from the front, take out a pen/pencil and
your bellwork.

• We are taking notes and doing a worksheet.

• Sectionalism Quiz Friday 3/31.

• STAAR INFO: NEXT SLIDE, PLEASE WAIT!!!

• Bellwork:
• What law created a profit motive in returning escaped slaves or capturing free
African Americans?
For STAAR and Class
Tuesday/Wednesday
• Bring something to read when finished STAAR TEST!!!

• Tuesday 3/28: 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th periods meet.

• Wednesday 3/29: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th periods meet.

• We will have study hall. Perfect time to make up
work/organize folder!
• This is NOT free time. Classroom rules still apply.
Dred Scott
Case
• Dred Scott: a slave in Missouri, owned by an Army officer
• Taken to Illinois and Wisconsin (both free)
• Owner dies in 1846: Scott sues, claiming he is free since he lived in 2 free
places

Court Decision
• Slaves are not citizens. They are property and
cannot sue anyone in court
• Congress has no power to limit the
expansion of slavery (huge win for the South)
Judge Dred
Taney Scott
John Brown & Harper’s Ferry
• John Brown: radical abolitionist, willing to kill and die for abolition

• Leads followers to arsenal at Harper’s Ferry - Plans to arm slaves and start a
revolt

• Local militia & marines (led by Robert E. Lee) kill or capture all of Brown’s men

• Brought national attention to the division on the nation
Election of
1860
• Slavery is the primary issue of the 1860 election
• New Republican Party had formed in 1854
• Lincoln promised he would NOT abolish slavery where it already
existed
• South did not believe Lincoln – threatened to secede if elected
South Carolina Secedes
• South Carolina secedes a month after the election of 1860
• Ten more states will join SC in the next few months
• Population in 1860: North = 22 million, South = 9.1 million
o 39% of South is slave