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Train-The-

Trainer
AN INSTRUCTORS GUIDE TO PRESENT
EFFECTIVE TRAINING FOR THE COURSE
MANAGING LIFES PROJECTS
Acknowledgement
The Managing Lifes Projects program was created by
the Project Management Institute - Delaware Valley
Chapter. The Train the Trainer manual is the
Instructors Guide to present effective training for the
Managing Lifes Projects program.

The PMI Educational Foundation supports the chapters


efforts to bring project management to nonprofit, civic,
and community organizations. The program is
available at www.pmief.org.
Agenda
Principles of Effective
Learning
Getting Started
Preparing
Showing Up
Setting Up
Starting the Class

Dos and Donts


What is Learning?
Learning is:
A transformation that takes
place over time
A continuous cycle of action
and reflection
Most effective when it
addresses issues relevant to
the learner and when people
learn with others
Maximized in a supportive
and challenging
environment

People are not robots; they cannot be programmed.


Effective Training
Involves Participation
Learning process is
influenced by:
Experience and background
Learning preferences
Learning styles

Adult learners typically


learn:
Independently
Through active participation
By observing a model
performance
By doing

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


The ARCS Model
Attention
Capture their interest with
Attention
(A)
novel approaches and
personal stories
Increase their curiosity with
questions
Student
Satisfacti Relevanc
on (S)
Motivatio
e (R)
Vary your presentation style
n
with interaction
Relevance
Confiden
Relate it to their world with
ce (C) specific examples
Define goals and explain why
the material is important
Help them achieve their
objectives

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


The ARCS Model (Continued)

Confidence
Explain the requirements
Attention and make them achievable
(A)
Challenge them and keep
them busy
Let them control the
Satisfactio Student Relevance activities and provide
n (S) Motivation (R) feedback

Satisfaction
Use problems and real life
Confidenc
e (C)
situations to apply their new
skills
Use praise, rewards, and
encouragement
Use fair evaluation criteria

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


On-The-Job Training
Model

Tellin Trainer Tells Trainee Tells


Trainer
Shows an

g Example

Doin Trainer Does Trainee Does


Trainer
Reviews and
Provides
g Feedback

Tell me, I listen! Show me, I see! Involve me, I


understand!
Exercise
Create a group of 3-5
people
Imagine a specific
Managing Lifes Projects
audience
Think of one specific,
creative way to apply each
of the four ARCS model
principles
Discuss your ideas with your
group

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


The Presentation

Facilitatio Lectur
n e

Exerci
ses

Effective
Training
Facilitation vs.
Presentation
FACILITATION PRESENTATION
Information is presented with Presents information in one
interaction: direction:
Q and A Instructor participant
Activities Effective when:
Exercises Introducing topics
Demonstrations Presenting facts
Group discussions Dealing with information that
Role playing requires explanation

Facilitation is interactive. Presentation is passive.


Exercises
The purpose of exercises and activities is to:
Generate new and different viewpoints
Develop interpersonal skills
Put newly acquired knowledge into practice
Encourage critical thinking
Increase participant interest in the training material content
Provide feedback to the participants and trainer
Getting Started

Starting
Preparin Showing Setting the
g Up Up
Class
Preparing
Know your students
Tailor your material for them
Predict their questions and
prepare answers

Know the facility


Room setup
AV equipment

Know your material


Develop a plan for the day

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


Showing Up
Make every effort to keep
your commitment to your
students
Identify potential substitutes
before you need them
If you cannot keep your
commitment:
Arrange for one of your
substitutes to take the class
Provide your material and
methods to your substitutes
Inform your substitute of the
class progress, knowledge,
and abilities

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


Setting Up
Group tables and chairs into
teams of 5 to 7 people
For small classes, use one
table (round or oval is ideal)
Avoid the spectator
classroom setup

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


Starting the Class
The first 30 seconds sets the
tone
Make it personal, interesting,
and real
Demonstrate that you care
Start with the big picture

Involve the students for 15 to


30 minutes
Use questions, exercises ,and
games

Attention spans get shorter as


the class progresses
Allow short breaks every hour
Intersperse lectures with
exercises
Use visual aides and media
COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER
Desire to be involved in the
training process
Subject matter expert
Characterist
Good communication skills
ics of an
Patience
Effective
Trainer Understand the learning
process
Respect differences in
participants ability to learn
Good diagnostic skills
Dos Donts
Take the time to be Give long-winded
prepared introductions
Have a plan Tell long war stories
Be time-conscious Read your slides
Be knowledgeable Yield control to the
students
Dos and Be personal

Donts for Show your personality

Trainers Be lively and


passionate
Be creative
Use everyday language
Be interested in the
students
Answer questions
Involve the students
Have the students
practice
Exercise
Create a group of 3-5
people
Recall a training class in
which you participated
Think about what made the
class effective or ineffective
Discuss your insights with
your group

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


Managing for Lifes
Projects Presentation
Schedule
The Managing for Lifes
Projects course is designed
for three two-hour
presentations
Day one:
Introduction Day 1 Day 2 Day 3
Project Initiation Intro Plannin Monitor
Initiatio g Closure
Day two: n Executio Summar
Planning n y
Execution
Day Three:
Monitor and Control
Closure
Summary

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


References
Jones, E (1990). Train the Trainer. Rhode Island:
Management Training Consultants.
Keller, J.M. (1983). Motivational design of instruction, In
C.M. Reigeluth (ed.) Instructional Design theories and
models: An overview of their current status. Hillside, NJ:
Erlbaum.
Keller, J. M. (1987). Strategies for stimulating the
motivation to learn. Performance and instruction, 26(8),
1-7 (EJ 362 632).
Williams, P (2001). Adult Learning theory and application.
NJ: PSEG.

COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER


Contributors
Executive Sponsor: James Snyder

Co-Authors:
Marie Hegarty
Jerry Pearson

Major Contributors:
Ramesh Arumugam
Kristi Baldwin
Marcos Beolchi de Arruda
John A. Gaffney
Carol L. Haines
Matthew D. Rusnak
Vicki Sama
Haifa Tyler
Robert Weidner
Sandra Williams

Special Thanks to John J. Byrne, Ph.D., PMP:


Dr. Byrne was a prime contributor to the K-12 curriculum developed in 2009 by PMI-DVC which was
presented first at the
Philadelphia School District Offices, and later, at three area high schools. He was the lead instructor for
the pilot program in
the School District. He generously permitted the current team to benefit from his leadership,
knowledge, and experience
teaching Project Management.
COPYRIGHT 2015 PMI-DELAWARE VALLEY CHAPTER