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WASTE MANAGEMENT IN

AUSTRALIA
The volume of waste generated would give a good indication of
the cumulative impact that people and their waste have on the
environment.
Currently, there is no consistent data source that enables us to
sufficiently assess whether progress has been made in this
dimension.
However, some information is available that enables us to
present an indication of the volume of waste generated and
these are presented as supplementary progress indicators.
WASTE GENERATION
In 201011 Australians on average
generated 2.2 tonnes per capita of
waste.
60% of which was recycled or
recovered for embodied energy.
Inclusion of fly ash from coal fired
power stations increases the
average per capita waste
generation by 28% to 2.8 tonnes,
with a resource recovery rate of
56%.
In total, Australians generated
around 48milliontonnes (Mt) of
waste excluding fly ash, and 62 Mt
including fly ash.
WASTE GENERATION
Australian per capita trends, 200607 to 201011

Waste generation per capita inAustraliawas reasonably


stable at around 2.1 tonnes per capita per year (with a small
increase of 2.6% over the period, or 0.6% per year).
The resource recovery rate inAustraliaincreased from 51
per cent to 60% (excluding fly ash)
Waste recycling per capita inAustraliarose by around 20 %
over the period, or 4.6% per year.
Material used for producing energy from waste
inAustraliaincreased marginally from 60kg to 70 kg per
capita per year (or 8% over the period, or 2.0% per year).
Waste disposal inAustraliadecreased, falling from around
1.03 tonnes to around 0.88tonnes per capita per year
(representing a fall of around 15 % in four years, or 4.0% per
capita per year).
WASTE GENERATION
Australian total waste generation trends, 200607 to
201011

Australia continued to generate more waste as the population


grew, with waste generation increasing from around 44 Mt to
around 48 Mt per year (an increase of 9.1% over in four years, or
2.2% per year).
The total quantity of material recycled in Australia increased
significantly from 21.4 Mt to 27.3 Mt per year (or by about 27% in
four years, or 6.3% per year).
Australias total energy recovery increased from about 1.32 Mt to
1.52 Mt per year (or by about 15% over four years, or 3.6% per
year).
Australias total disposal tonnage decreased from about 21.5 Mt to
about 19.5 Mt per year (or by about 9 % over four years, or 2.5 %
per year).
The resource recovery rate in Australia increased from 51 % to 60
% between 200607 and 201011 (an increase of 9 %).
SOLID WASTE
MANAGEMENT
IN AUSTRALIA
Waste collection
SOLID WASTE

Solid waste encompasses many waste types produced


in all areas of society.
Municipal solid waste (MSW) is the major type of waste
most people think of when the word or term waste is
mentioned.
There are two other main classifications of solid waste
1.commercial and industrial waste.
2.construction and demolition waste.
Each waste type poses different risks and opportunities
and requires different management.
What happens after we've collected your General Waste?
HOUSEHOLD WASTE
household waste is collected by garbage trucks.
put their rubbish in bins with different coloured lids
RED
GREEN
YELLOW
Leave the bins outside for collection once a week.
Will be sorted and will either be recycled or sent to a
landfill.
TRANSFER STATIONAND MATERIAL RECOVERY FACILITIES

A transfer station is a depotthat receives and


temporarilystores waste in a designated areafor
minorsegregation and/or minor resource recovery to their
transport to some other approved depot for further sorting,
resource recovery or disposal.
Similarly a material recovery facility (MRF)receives, stores
and processes waste but with a focus on resource recovery.
There will be a transfer component in order to direct the
recovered recyclable wastes to a recycling facility and
residual waste to disposal.
RECYCLING FACILITIES

A recycling facility receives, stores and processes pre-


sortedsingle streams of waste andprocesses it into a
recycled product, eg recycled paper and plastic
containers.
A recycling facility can receive its sorted wastes (eg
bailed cardboard or glass) from material recovery
facilities and transfer stations, or directly from the
producer.
The wastesare then processed in some manner to
create a saleable productto an established market.
COMPOSTING
The composting process is one in which micro-
organisms break down plant material and similar
organic matter to produce a humus-like final material.
Bacteria and fungi are the main micro-organisms, while
small animals such as worms and nematodes help with
physical breakdown processes.
After a final maturation or curing phase, the compost
is ready to be used for soil improvement and as a
growing medium.
Wastes that can be used include animal manures, green
wastes from parks and gardens, certain industrial
wastes as well as food wastes.
PROBLEM AND CHALLENGES
Dump waste at abandoned mine Solid
near the regional town of Goulburn waste
and
limite
Finding new and appropriate landfill d Waste estimated 20 per cent
sites is becoming much more difficult landfil from of marine debris was
and the concept of a landfill itself is not likely to come from
sustainable.
ls ships
ships.
PROB a
growi
LEMS ng Rules are frequently
IN proble got broken
MANA m
The National Tyre GING
Product Stewardship SOLID
Scheme was launched
in 2014 end- WAST
of-life E
E-
tyres waste The National Television and
Increase domestic
tyre recycling (Electr Computer Recycling Scheme was
ical established in 2011.
and
electr Industry-funded collection and
onic recycling services for televisions
and computers
waste
)
PROBLEM AND CHALLENGES
Lack of clarity has led to confusion by agencies about
their responsibilities, poor planning for individual
actions, and a lack of coordination of resources across
government.
This lack of clarity has also resulted in delays in
implementation and progressing of actions.
GOVERMENT
Department of Sustainability and Environment, through
its Environment Policy and Climate Change Branch, is
responsible for coordinating portfolio and government
strategies for environmental sustainability.
The Environment Protection Authority administers the
Environment Protection Act 1970 and its instruments,
including those relating to the regulation of waste
management and resource recovery facilities and
services.
Municipal councils provide waste and recycling services
to residents and ratepayers
STATE AGENCY
Sustainability Victoria is the state agency responsible
for environmental sustainability, including planning and
facilitating the management of solid waste throughout
Victoria.