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LONELY, SELFISH AND WEIRD:

A STUDY OF THE DIFFERENCES


BETWEEN ONLY CHILDREN
AND NON-ONLY CHILDREN
LAUREN TADDEI
Will never amount to
Lo n el y
anything Weir
d
Needs Selfs
h
constan
t
Undesira
attenti
ble
on
Spoiled
De p e n d e
Excessiv nt on
e m m y
ly Smart Have no M o
friends and
ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE
THEORY.
A SYSTEM OF SHARED ASSUMPTIONS, VALUES, AND
BELIEFS, WHICH GOVERNS HOW PEOPLE BEHAVE IN
ORGANIZATIONS. THESE SHARED VALUES HAVE A
STRONG INFLUENCE ON THE PEOPLE IN THE
ORGANIZATIONAND DICTATE HOW THEY DRESS,
ACT, AND PERFORM THEIR JOBS.
WHAT DO THE SCHOLARS SAY?
Only children
consistently show
higher scores in
intelligence,
H E N U M B ER O F Only c
AS T H O N LY O NE achievement and hildren
WIT
FAMILIES E A SE D motivation.. recipie are th
e sole
S I N C R nts of t
CHILD HA O N C E RN (Mancillas, 2006) resourc heir pa
OVER TIM
E , C es and rents
R E O T Y PE S they d attenti
AN D S T E o not on and
U E A B O UT exper have to
C O NT IN i en c e
O W I N G UP compe the con
G R
B L I NGS tition t fict an
W I TH OU
T S I most s h at is in d
N D S P IT ZE, ibling herent
(TRENT A (Manci relatio in
llas, 20 nships
2 0 11 ) 06)
RESEARCH QUESTIONS

SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CHILDREN WITH


SIBLINGS AND ONLY CHILDREN
COMMON STEREOTYPES
ARE THEY ACCURATE?
IF THERE ARE SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES, WHAT ARE THEY?
BELIEFS ACCORDING TO NON-
ONLY CHILDREN
BELIEFS ACCORDING TO ONLY
CHILDREN
RESULTS.

Non-Only Only Children Averages


Children
20% 20% Averages
IND AV
21% 18% MOT AV
IND AV SS AV
19% MOT AV SELFISH AV
25%
SS AV 19% AE AV
26%
16% SELFISH AV
16%
AE AV
Limitations
FUTURE RESEARCH
SOURCES
DENISON. (2011, NOVEMBER 15). ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE THEORY.
RETRIEVED DECEMBER 8, 2016,
MANCILLAS, A (2006). CHALLENGING THE STEREOTYPES ABOUT ONLY
CHILDREN: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR
PRACTICE. JOURNAL OF COUNSELING AND DEVELOPMENT, 84(3), 268-
275. DOI: 10.1002/J. 1556-6678.2006.TB00405.X
TRENT, K., & SPITZE, G. (2011), GROWING UP WITHOUT SIBLINGS AND
ADULT SOCIABILITY BEHAVIORS. JOURNAL OF FAMILY ISSUES, 32(9), 1178-
1204. DOI: 10.1177/01925X11398945