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THE SCHOOL & THE

HOME PARTNERSHIP

KROMUEL P. ALCANTARA
APPRIL REMEL CORPUZ

The Aims of the World Education
Fellowship and the Example of Honora
Deane
The balance of personal growth of individuals
and their social responsibility to the community is
one of the highest goals of education at all levels,
and by encouraging a wider vision of social
purposes encourages as to work constructively
towards improving the human and environmental
condition at the national and international level.

The Aims of the World Education
Fellowship and the Example of Honora
Deane
The need to strive for social justice
and for equality and access in
education (as stated in 10 National
Goals for Education) is another aim of
the World Education Fellowship.

being one which develops their talents and capacities to full potential. . and is relevant to the social. The Hobart Declaration on Schooling The Agreed National Goals for(1989) Schooling include the following aims: To provide an excellent education 1 for all young people. cultural and economic needs of the nation.

respect for others and achievement of personal excellence. The Hobart Declaration on Schooling The Agreed National Goals for(1989) Schooling include the following aims: To enable all students to achieve 2 high standards of learning and to develop self-confidence. high self-esteem. . optimism.

and to provide for groups with special learning requirements. . The Hobart Declaration on Schooling The Agreed National Goals for(1989) Schooling include the following aims: To promote equality of 3 education opportunities.

. The Hobart Declaration on Schooling The Agreed National Goals for(1989) Schooling include the following aims: To respond to the current and 4 emerging economic and social needs of the nation. and to provide those skills which will allow students maximum flexibility and adaptability in their future employment and other aspects of life.

The Hobart Declaration on Schooling The Agreed National Goals for(1989) Schooling include the following aims: To provide a foundation for 5 further education and training. respect for learning and positive attitudes for life-long education. in terms of knowledge and skills. .

reading and writing. •skills of numeracy. speaking. together with scientific and technological skills. •skills of information processing and computing. and other mathematical skills. including skills in listening. •skills of analysis and problem solving. •a knowledge and appreciation of Australias historical and geographic context. 6 To develop in students: •the skills of English literacy. . •an understanding of the role of science and technology in society.

and concern for. •an appreciation and understanding of. balanced development and the global environment. and confidence to participate in. ethics and social justice . 6 To develop in students: •a knowledge of languages other than English. •an understanding of. the creative arts. and •a capacity to exercise judgement in matters of morality.

The Hobart Declaration on Schooling The Agreed National Goals for(1989) Schooling include the following aims: To develop knowledge. 7 attitudes and values which will enable students to participate as active and informed citizens in our democratic Australian society within an international context. . skills.

. The Hobart Declaration on Schooling The Agreed National Goals for(1989) Schooling include the following aims: To provide students with an 8 understanding and respect for our cultural heritage including the particular cultural background of Aboriginal and ethnic groups.

The Hobart Declaration on Schooling The Agreed National Goals for(1989) Schooling include the following aims: To provide for the physical 9 development and personal health and fitness of students. and for the creative use of leisure time. .

The Hobart Declaration on Schooling The Agreed National Goals for(1989) Schooling include the following aims: To provide appropriate career 10 education and knowledge of the world of work. . including an understanding of the nature and place of work in our society.

a longitudinal cohort. Parental Influence upon Education The Tasmanian Retention Analysis. study conducted within the Youth Education Studies Centre since 1984 highlighted: “The highly significant role which parental values and preferences have in the encouragement of educational participation and the link with the student motivations to study" Researchers also found the particularly significant role played by mother's encouragement .

The impact of family background is not just through financial and material advantage or disadvantage but by "parental valuing of education and the encouragement which accompanies this" . Parental Influence upon Education Williams and colleagues at the Australian Council for Educational Research in Melbourne have found similar associations.

C. Parental Influence upon Education Most recent work from A.R. "Parents are models for such decisions. especially at the post-compulsory level. and a source of encouragement and advice for adolescents. As parents vary in their education. . so too will the models to which children are exposed. their knowledge of education and the kind of encouragement and active and advice provided (Williams et al 1993 pp. 41. a knowledge resource.42). on Year 12 completion and higher education entry emphasizes the way in which parental educational experiences and attainments influence the educational decisions of their children.E.

. Parental Influence upon Education analysis of national cohort data of the Australian Youth Survey reveals that: Parental education is far more influential on post-school career choices and destinations than is parental occupation (as a socio-economic measure).

In the long term as intergenerational educational experience of participation and attainment increases.Parental Influence upon Education The implications for change of these findings with respect to increasing equality of educational opportunity are long term and short term. In the short term these inequalities in family background are resistant to change. so will educational mobility and access. especially for girls. .

including the provision of public financial support like AUSTUDY and ABSTUDY do work towards greater equity in educational participation and research has shown this.Parental Influence upon Education Government social justice strategies. . But differences in patterns of attrition at post- compulsory level in terms of background still remain especially for the most grossly disadvantaged groups.

1991). aboriginality. . Hughes and Wyld 1991). Sometimes students suffer from multiple disadvantage (Abbott-Chapman. ethnicity (especially those from non-English speaking backgrounds) and physical and sensory disability (A.E. rurality and isolation.Parental Influence upon Education These would include students disadvantaged by low socio-economic background.C.

which will help break down the barriers to full participation. This is a very tall order but many of our effective schools and inspirational teachers are doing just that and we should not underestimate their contribution. Easthope and O'Connor 1994). .Parental Influence upon Education This being the case solutions have to be found within the educational system itself. raise students' educational expectations for themselves and enable them to meet them (Abbott-Chapman .

. Within the effective school it appears to be the quality of the teachers above all which establishes the climate for student learning. The Influence of the Teacher and the School Teachers can do make a difference to their students' participation and achievement.

Respondents believed that effective staff set high but realistic expectations.67). and are themselves willing to nominate their teaching and to monitor new ways of working" (McGaw et al 1992 p. . positive attitude towards learning and encourage students. The Influence of the Teacher and the School As a recent national study has community members and teachers sampled cited aspects of professional staff as the key elements in school effectiveness.

The Influence of the Teacher and the School What are the qualities and characteristics of effective teachers? An enthusiasm for and knowledge of subject. an ability to communicate well. . Holloway and Wyld 1990). Hughes. Such teachers offer their students a "vision of learning" which enables them to transcend barriers and problems and enhances their self esteem. and a responsiveness to student learning needs within a relationship of mutual respect" (Abbott-Chapman.

171). The Influence of the Teacher and the School Some schools also appear to be better than others in providing an encouraging educational climate and hence a greater "holding power" over their students even after allowing for students' family background characteristics (Ainley and Sheret 1992 p. .

No. 12. structure and delivery and the leadership provided by Principal and Senior staff all play their part. The Influence of the Teacher and the School Curriculum content. 1993) .4. or are school refusers.as investigation of alternative school arrangement testifies (Youth Studies Australia Vol. But it appears that the quality and dedication of classroom teachers are at the heart of school retentiveness and an achieving school climate. This is also true for alienated and marginalized students persistently truant.

The Influence of the Teacher and the School "These research findings along with others from a wide array of studies that students' positive expectations for themselves. are powerful agents for educational participation and achievement" (Abbott-Chapman 1994a p. 17). and an encouraging educational climate which enables them to overcome obstacles to learning. .

Young people suffer most of all and are the most vulnerable "casualties of change" (Eckersley. a state of what has been called 'future shock" (Toffier 1971). . Contemporary trends in society which impact upon the home and school partnership Rapid change. change which seems "out of control" tends to bring about feelings of helplessness and negativism. 1988 and 1992).

3. Socially in terms of community and family breakdown which tears away essential emotional support and impairs development of values of self esteem and social responsibility. Psychologically and emotionally because positive aspirations and expectations for the future seem pointless and goal formation is impaired or absent. 2. . Economically in terms of reduced opportunities for employment and financial independence. Contemporary trends in society which impact upon the home and school partnership Young people in consequence tend to suffer in these ways: 1.

violent theft. alienated and aimless. street gang fights. Sometimes. Contemporary trends in society which impact upon the home and school partnership Not surprisingly more and more young people at a time of life when they should be most hopeful and most most purposeful are dispirited and depressed. sexual promiscuity. Sometimes they take out their anger and frustration on others . . reckless driving and self injury (including eating disorders).muggings.alcohol and drug abuse. Classroom violence and attacks on teachers are also on the increase as recent medical reports reveal. bashings. they take out their anger and frustration on themselves in the form of risky or destructive behaviour .

Contemporary trends in society which impact upon the home and school partnership It seems that in future more teachers and principals will seek redress under the law in dealing with classroom violence and with groups of -undesirable" youth loitering near school gates. and pushing drugs (Abbott-Chapman 1994) . harassing students and teachers.

. Contemporary trends in society which impact upon the home and school partnership It is not surprising that within this climate growing numbers of teachers are beginning to ask where the line between teacher and social worker is drawn.

. The changing relationship between the home and the school Even in dealing with the day to day social and emotional problems of children and adolescents teachers find they need to become more skilled in pastoral care and counselling. In some instances where children only eat take-away food at home teachers are even faced with teaching basic table manners and the use of the knife and fork.

. The changing relationship between the home and the school The demand for the setting up of counselling courses for teachers and trainee teachers is increasing and more teachers are suffering stress and "burnout" (Abbott- Chapman 1993).

and to enhance the communication and the partnership between family and teachers in the very important job of bringing up the next generation. The changing relationship between the home and the school We need all the political and practical help possible to reinforce the strength of the extended family. .

It seems clear therefore that if we are also making more demands upon teachers in areas other than teaching. and if we are to aim needed. These include: . and responsibility for effective implementation of all these changes falls mainly on teachers' (Beazeley 1993 p. Supporting the home/school partnership "The impact implementation of. 4).

More "time out" for teachers in stressful situations is essential. 3. . 6. Supporting the home/school partnership 1. More "counselling" training is needed to assist teachers in "early warning" of student problems. More specialist counselors. 2. school nurses and other ancillary support staff are needed to enable teachers to find time to teach . 4. Smaller classes are important in giving individual students more attention. More teachers are needed to share the load. Stronger legal backing for teachers and principals coping with violent students is needed. 5.

Teachers are doing all they can to help families - now is the time for families publicly to back our teachers. Even in times of economic scarcity if there is strong political will resources can be found. . Supporting the home/school partnership Above all we need to lobby our politicians for more resourcing for education.