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Presentation created for the Intel® Teach to the Future program

by Judi Edman Yost Institute of Computer Technology
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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What is Copyright?
Laws have been created to protect authors and artists that create things that are creative and “original.” If someone produces something that is original – no one else has created anything quite like it – then that person is the only one who can copy it, perform it in public, or publish it, unless he/she gives that permission to someone else. That’s what it means to have the right to copy (copyright).
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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What is not protected by copyright law?
• Works that have not been written or recorded (your stories, if they are not written down, are not protected by copyright law) • Ideas, procedures, methods, discoveries • Works that contain no original authorship (for example: standard calendars, height and weight charts, tape measures and rulers, etc.) • Lists of data (such as the telephone book) • Items in the public domain (meaning works that are available for anyone to use. All works created before 1923 and most between 1923-1963 are in the public domain) • Most U.S. government materials (some items created by contractors for the government might be copyrighted) • Facts
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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What is “fair use”?
Fair Use is a part of the United States Copyright law. It allows people to use and make copies of copyrighted works if they are using them for:
– – – – – – criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research
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© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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Before using copyrighted work, ask yourself:
• Is the copying for educational use? • Is the original material mainly facts, not very original, and published? • Are you using small amounts, not whole sections? • Is the original material freely available? (Meaning, the author is not trying to make money on it) If any answers are “no” – be careful! The use of that work might not fall under “fair use.”
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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Sometimes, it is hard to know how much of a copyrighted work we can use. To help us know what is Fair Use, the

“Fair Use Guidelines to Educational Multimedia” were created.
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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The “Fair Use Guidelines to Educational Multimedia” help us know how much to use…
Use the smallest amount of: Motion Media Text Poetry Music, Lyrics, Video Photos & Illustrations Numerical Data Sets
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

10% or 3 minutes 10% or 1000 words 250 words; no more than 3 poems by same author 10% or 30 seconds 5 images from one author 10% of 2500 fields or cells
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Giving Credit to the Author/Creator
• Always credit the author:
– On a “Works Cited” or References page of a report or presentation, include (if available):
• • • • The author’s name The title of the work The publisher The place and date of publication

– List the copyright information underneath any copyrighted images. Example:
© 2002 Author’s Name
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© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

Giving Credit to the Author/Creator
• For copyrighted works from a Web site, include:
– The Author’s name
– – – – – The Title of the Work The name of the Site The date it was posted on the Web or revised The date you obtained the work from the Web The Web site’s address (URL)

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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Future Uses Beyond Fair Use
If there is a possibility that a project could be published beyond the classroom (for example, published on the Internet), obtain permissions when you create your project, rather than waiting.

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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Click here for Sources
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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Sources Consulted and For More Information...
“Fair Use Guidelines For Educational Multimedia”
Prepared by the Educational Multimedia Fair Use Guidelines Development Committee, July 17, 1996 http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/fairuse/guidelines.html

“Fair Use Of Copyrighted Materials”

by Georgia Harper, University of Texas http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/copypol2.htm

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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Sources Consulted and For More Information...
“Copyright Basics” by the U.S. Copyright Office http://www.loc.gov/copyright/circs/circ1.html “Fair Use Guidelines For Educational Multimedia: Background and Summary” by Chris Dalziel http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/fairuse/dalziel.html “The Copyright Website” by Benedict O’Mahoney http://www.benedict.com/ “Copyright Law in the Electronic Environment” by Georgia Harper, University of Texas http:// www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/faculty.htm
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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Sources Consulted and For More Information...
“Highlights of the Fair Use Guidelines for Educational Multimedia” by Stan Diamond and deg farrelly
http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/fairuse/fairhigh.html

“10 Big Myths about Copyright Explained” by Brad Templeton
http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html http://www.duhaime.org/diction.htm

“Duhaime's Law Dictionary” by Lloyd Duhaime “When Works Pass Into the Public Domain in the United States” by Cornell Institute for Digital Collections
http://cidc.library.cornell.edu/copyright/
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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Other Resources
“Rules Of Thumb For Digitizing And Using Others' Works In Multimedia Materials For Educational Purposes” by Georgia Harper, University of Texas “Rules Of Thumb For Coursepacks” by Georgia Harper, University of Texas

http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/copypol2.htm#mm

http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/copypol2.htm#course

“A Proposal For Educational Fair Use Guidelines For Digital Images” by Georgia Harper, University of Texas http:// www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/imagguid.htm
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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Other Resources
And if you still can’t get enough of this subject, check out other sites at:

List of Links to Other Copyright Sites
by Georgia Harper, University of Texas http:// www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/offsite.htm

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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This presentation is copyrighted by Intel. However, it may be used, with copyright notices intact, for not-for-profit, educational purposes.

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved.

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