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Presentation created for the

Intel® Teach to the Future program


by Judi Edman Yost
Institute of Computer Technology

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 1


What is Copyright?
Laws have been created to protect authors
and artists that create things that are
creative and “original.”
If someone produces something that is
original – no one else has created anything
quite like it – then that person is the only one
who can copy it, perform it in public, or
publish it, unless he/she gives that
permission to someone else.
That’s what it means to have the right to
copy (copyright).
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 2
What is not protected by
copyright law?
• Works that have not been written or recorded (your stories, if
they are not written down, are not protected by copyright law)
• Ideas, procedures, methods, discoveries
• Works that contain no original authorship (for example:
standard calendars, height and weight charts, tape measures
and rulers, etc.)
• Lists of data (such as the telephone book)
• Items in the public domain (meaning works that are available
for anyone to use. All works created before 1923 and most
between 1923-1963 are in the public domain)
• Most U.S. government materials (some items created by
contractors for the government might be copyrighted)
• Facts

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 3


© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 4
What is “fair use”?
Fair Use is a part of the United States
Copyright law.
It allows people to use and make copies of
copyrighted works if they are using them for:
– criticism,
– comment,
– news reporting,
– teaching,
– scholarship, or
– research

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 5


© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 6
Before using copyrighted work,
ask yourself:
• Is the copying for educational use?
• Is the original material mainly facts, not very
original, and published?
• Are you using small amounts, not whole
sections?
• Is the original material freely available? (Meaning,
the author is not trying to make money on it)

If any answers are “no” – be careful!


The use of that work might not fall under “fair use.”

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 7


Sometimes, it is hard to know how much
of a copyrighted work we can use.
To help us know what is Fair Use, the
“Fair Use Guidelines to
Educational Multimedia”
were created.
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 8
The “Fair Use Guidelines to Educational
Multimedia” help us know how much to use…
Use the smallest amount of:

Motion Media 10% or 3 minutes


Text 10% or 1000 words
Poetry 250 words; no more than
3 poems by same author

Music, Lyrics, Video 10% or 30 seconds


Photos & Illustrations 5 images from one author
Numerical Data Sets 10% of 2500 fields or cells
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 9
Giving Credit to the Author/Creator
• Always credit the author:
– On a “Works Cited” or References page of a
report or presentation, include (if available):
• The author’s name
• The title of the work
• The publisher
• The place and date of publication
– List the copyright information underneath any
copyrighted images. Example:
© 2002 Author’s Name

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 10


Giving Credit to the Author/Creator
• For copyrighted works from a Web site,
include:
– The Author’s name
– The Title of the Work
– The name of the Site
– The date it was posted on the Web or revised
– The date you obtained the work from the Web
– The Web site’s address (URL)

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 11


Future Uses Beyond Fair Use
If there is a possibility that a
project could be published
beyond the classroom (for
example, published on the
Internet), obtain permissions
when you create your project,
rather than waiting.

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 12


Click here
for Sources
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 13
Sources Consulted
and For More Information...
“Fair Use Guidelines For Educational
Multimedia”
Prepared by the Educational Multimedia Fair Use Guidelines
Development Committee, July 17, 1996
http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/fairuse/guidelines.html
“Fair Use Of Copyrighted Materials”
by Georgia Harper, University of Texas
http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/copypol2.htm

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 14


Sources Consulted
and For More Information...
“Copyright Basics” by the U.S. Copyright Office
http://www.loc.gov/copyright/circs/circ1.html
“Fair Use Guidelines For Educational Multimedia:
Background and Summary” by Chris Dalziel
http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/fairuse/dalziel.html

“The Copyright Website” by Benedict O’Mahoney


http://www.benedict.com/

“Copyright Law in the Electronic Environment”


by Georgia Harper, University of Texas http://
www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/faculty.htm
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 15
Sources Consulted
and For More Information...
“Highlights of the Fair Use Guidelines for
Educational Multimedia” by Stan Diamond and deg farrelly
http://www.libraries.psu.edu/mtss/fairuse/fairhigh.html

“10 Big Myths about Copyright Explained”


by Brad Templeton
http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html

“Duhaime's Law Dictionary” by Lloyd Duhaime


http://www.duhaime.org/diction.htm

“When Works Pass Into the Public Domain in the United


States” by Cornell Institute for Digital Collections
http://cidc.library.cornell.edu/copyright/
© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 16
Other Resources
“Rules Of Thumb For Digitizing And Using Others' Works In
Multimedia Materials For Educational Purposes”
by Georgia Harper,
University of Texas
http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/copypol2.htm#mm

“Rules Of Thumb For Coursepacks”


by Georgia Harper, University of Texas
http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/copypol2.htm#course

“A Proposal For Educational Fair Use Guidelines For Digital


Images” by Georgia Harper, University of Texas http://
www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/imagguid.htm

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 17


Other Resources

And if you still can’t get enough of this subject,


check out other sites at:
List of Links to Other Copyright Sites
by Georgia Harper, University of Texas http://
www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/offsite.htm

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 18


This presentation is
copyrighted by Intel.
However, it may be used,
with copyright notices intact,
for not-for-profit,
educational purposes.

© 1999-2003 Intel. All rights reserved. Slide # 19