G325 1B: Media Language

L.O: Identify how media
language is used to create
meaning in one of your
productions
G325 Exam
Section A: Theoretical Evaluation of
Production (50 marks)

Section B: Contemporary Media Issues
(50 marks)

The exam is 2 hours which allows for
2x30 minutes for questions 1(a)
and 1(b) and one hour for the
postmodernism question in section B.
• You MUST answer both question 1a
and 1b!

• Question 1(a) is about you and
your skills development across
your production work, from
Foundation Portfolio to Advanced
Portfolio. You need to describe and
evaluate your skills development
from AS to A2.

• Question 1(b): You need to select
Question 1b:
• You need toConcepts
select one production
and evaluate it in relation to a media
concept.

• Concepts: What terms
do you
• Representation remember??
• Genre Competition
• Narrative time!
• Audience
• Media Language
Media Language- What
• ‘they’
Media language referssay
to the ways in
which media producers make meaning in
ways that are specific to the medium in
which they are working
• How audiences come to be literate in
‘reading’ such meaning e.g the ‘language
of film’
• These medium-specific languages will
often be closely connected to other media
concepts such as genre or narrative and
candidates are at liberty to make such
connections to a greater or lesser extent
in their answers.
Quotes
• “Film is one of the three universal languages, the
other two: mathematics and music.” Frank Capra
• Marshall McLuhan argues that media are
languages, with their own structures and systems
of grammar.
• When a film is created, it is created in a
language, which is not only about words, but also
the way that very language encodes our
perception of the world, our understanding of it.
Andrzej Wajda
Media Language
Is also the conventions that we expect of
the media product
E.g. music video – editing in time to the
music, montage, direct address, abstract or
visuals that may link to the music or the
musical genre, star construction, the creation
of the relationship between the star and the
performer
Intertextuality is important in music videos
and gives additional meanings for the
audience.
Media Language
• Trailers – use of narrative/thematic/genre/
signifiers from the film cut together in order
to make the audience want to see the film.
• The ordering of these – so that it gives a taste
of the film and a sense of its visual style
• The use of intertitles to anchor meaning
• The use of sound to anchor meaning
• The use of institutional titles to make
intertextual links to similar films etc.
What is Media Language?
Race!!
In your pairs/trios,
choose a station.
• Mise en scene
• Cinematograph You will have two
y minutes with your
specified colour pen to
• Editing write down all of the
• Sound media language you
can remember for this
element.

You will then… move
https://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMqwSTe
5rvo
You are all invited to…

HAVERST
OCK
You are all
pretentiou
s film
critics!
The use of
As you watch pull focus
really
the opening- emphasised
the anguish
make notes of the
for the protagonist
and
element of reinforced
notions of the
media male gaze.

language I
give you. For
example…
Answering a question on
Media Language

L.O: To be able to talk about
your own productions
As the group feedback-
make notes on all that
they say about your
production- even if their
interpretation was not
what you intended. This
could raise interesting
issues of audience
response.
H AVERST
OCK
Now- focus on your
intentions. Complete the
chart with your choices
and the effect.

If the critics made an
exceptionally good
point- include their
Hcomments.
AVERST
OCK
Media Language Cinematography:
camera shots, angles, movement
Type of media Example/s: How it creates Links to audience/
language meaning/is other key
understood: concepts:
(connotations,
signifiers)

Mise en Scene
e.g. costumes, props,
settings, iconography,
body language

Cinematography:
camera shots, angles,
movement

Sound: diegetic, non-
diegetic, synchronous,
asynchronous,
dialogue, effects,
music

Editing: type (e.g.
continuity, montage
etc), style,
transitions, effects,
pace
Type of media Example/s: How it creates Links to audience/
language meaning/is other key
understood: concepts:
(connotations,
signifiers)

Mise en Scene
e.g. costumes, props,
settings, iconography,
body language

Cinematography:
camera shots, angles,
movement

Sound: diegetic, non-
diegetic, synchronous,
asynchronous,
dialogue, effects,
music

Editing: type (e.g.
continuity, montage
etc), style, transitions,
effects, pace
Actual question!

HAVERST
OCK
• P: Mise en Scene e.g. costumes, props,
settings, iconography, body language
• E:
• E: How it creates meaning/is understood:
• (connotations, signifiers)
• L: to audience/ other key concepts
• P: Cinematography: camera shots, angles,
movement, framing
• E:
• E: How it creates meaning/is understood:
• (connotations, signifiers)
• L: to audience/ other key concepts
• P: Sound: diegetic, non-diegetic,
synchronous, asynchronous, dialogue,
effects, music
• E:
• E
• L:

• P: Editing: type (e.g. continuity, montage
etc), style, transitions, effects, pace
• E:
• E:
• L:
Useful links
http://www.kenstone.net/fcp_homepage/language_of_film.htm
l

• We know that each language consists of learnt “words, phrases,
grammar, punctuation, ruleshttp://www.mediaknowall.com/as_alevel/alevel.php?pageID=f
and common practices” (Wohl,
ilmlang
Michael; The Language of Film 2008). Therefore we could
transfer this understanding to the micro elements of film,
camera, sound, mise-en-scene, editing etc, and/or go to a
deeper level of analysis with a detailed look at choices of shot
sizes, match-on-action, rules of continuity, framing and how
they are pieced/edited together to create a sentence and
therefore a language of communication.
Unlike the other concepts in this part of the exam, we are not so
much looking at what we are communicating but how we are
communicating it.
All of the decisions you made in your short films about which
shots, angles, costume, set design, location, lighting, character
movement, etc, play a part in this discussion.
Arguably the language of film can’t be discussed separately
from genre, narrative, representation and audience as your
knowledge of each of these influences the decisions you made
throughout production.