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ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Television news coverage of


violent crime
Student Name
University Affiliation
Date
Beckett, Katherine, and Theodore Sasson. "Crime
in the Media." Crime in the Media. Defending
Justice: An Activist Resource Kit, 2005. Web. 22
Feb. 2015.
In crime in the media article by Professor
Theodore Sasson and Professor Katherine
Becket, statistics about the existence of crime in
the media are discussed. The two writers argue
that the crime stories aired by the television
networks whose aim is to make a profit are meant
for the purposes of entertainment.
In the article, the writers clarify the various ways
in which crime stories are framed by the reporters
to increase the number of views. The writers also
talk about how criminal equity tolerance is being
underlined. We readers are given insights on the
existing statistics which are predominant in the
coverage.
More than 15% of the time, the media displaces
the coverage of more pressing issues with crime
stories. One of the most subject areas that is
frequent on television is the crime news with up
to 20 percent viewership. Crime stories which
begin the local bulletin are followed by health
stories.
This article by Professor Theodore Sasson and
Professor Katherine Becket might be biased since
the statistical information is from Activist
Resource Kit. For example how Y is caused by X
as a Casual stasis is answered.
Coyne, Sarah M. "Does Media Violence Cause
Violent Crime?" European Journal on Criminal
Policy and Research 13.3-4 (2007): 205-11. Web.
22 Feb. 2015.
Does the Media Violence Cause Violent Crime
is a scholarly article by psychology professor
Sarah Coyne. Sarah Coyne from University of
Central Lancashire focuses her studies on violent
media and violent crime. The professor tries to
figure out whether there exists any relationship or
link between the two.
Her research is based on research and
longitudinal studies and existing crime statistics.
She is trying to get to a conclusion on whether
violent crimes are caused by violent media.
Sarahs arguments are based on facts rather than
opinions as she tries to know whether media
violence cause violent crime
Coyne eliminates the possibilities of any biases
by backing up her argumentative facts with
scientific evidence. Coyne ends up concluding
that people on the highest trajectory are the ones
who are likely to be influenced by the violence
on TV while the aggressive ones are highly
encouraged to stay that way.
It is evident that crime stories are readily
available and are relatively cheap to gather.
Viewers see crime information as very
purposeful. These crime stories on television get
a lot of viewer attention. We can end up
concluding that citizens uncritically accept crime
news.
Guin, Karen. "Study: Media Instructs But Doesn't
Cause Criminal Behavior." UCF Today. 10 Oct.
2013. Web. 22 Feb. 2015.
Karen Guin is a blogger at the University of
Central Florida. Professor Ray Surette published
an article in UCF Today titled Study: Media
Instructs but Doesnt Cause Criminal Behavior.
Karen Guin reviews the article which was
published in the American Journal of Criminal
Justice.
The study focuses on how real life experiences
have an effect on the exposure to crime. On a
survey conducted to over five hundred inmates in
Orange County Jail in Florida it was clear that
media was their exposure to crime based on their
criminal history which they had.
Some questions of the study aimed at finding out
the influence of that copied crimes had on the
media. The results of the study in the Orange
County showed that copied crimes had a high
possibility of being triggered ion the real world.
Almost 20% of the inmates proved that the media
was very sourceful with information on how
crime should be committed.
The study concluded that cause of crime can be
highly associated with exposure to violence on
the television. Any possibility of biases is
eliminated since this study bases its conclusion
on facts.
Tufekci, Zeynep. "The Media Needs to Stop
Inspiring Copycat Murders. Here's How." The
Atlantic. Atlantic Media Company, 19 Dec. 2012.
Web. 22 Feb. 2015.
Zeynep Tufekci has an Atlantic article titled The
Media Needs to Stop Inspiring Copycat Murders.
Heres How. Zeynep gives a lot of evidence on
how crime in the past has influenced the media.
She argues that the media has a major role in
copycat crimes and goes ahead to give quite a
number of examples.
For instance in 2012, when the article was
written, there was a mass shooting that happened
in the United States. Another example was the
very contagious effect of suicide among
teenagers. She recognizes that mental health has
some role to play in societal violence.
Despite this fact, norms and heroes of our time
influence the committed violent crimes which at
the end of the day are displayed and
sensationalized by the media. In the conclusion of
her article, Tufekci gives out recommendations
on how copycat crimes can be prevented from
occurrence
She does not consider that the media may not be
blamed for the violence in the society thus
making her article very one-sided. However, her
article comes very much in hand when giving
ways on how copycat crimes influence can be
avoided in four strong ways.
"Violence in the Media Psychologists Study
TV and Video Game Violence for Potential
Harmful Effects." American Psychological
Association, Nov. 2013. Web. 22 Feb. 2015.
This article reviews the exploration of any link
between video violence and television with
regards to children. Sources of previously done
research on the effects of violence exposure to
children are deeply looked into in this article.
National Institute of Health conducted a research
to find out the major effects that individuals were
exposed to by television. The result of the
research showed that individuals became less
sensitive to pain and others suffering from crime
on the television.
People are likely to behave aggressively and
might also end up being fearful to the
surrounding. Basing conclusion on facts and
previous studies and research makes this article
by American Psychology Association non-biased.
The arguments in this article make it clear that
individuals are not influenced by violent media to
commit crimes. . Prevalence of violent crime is
highly exaggerated in the media.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Beckett, Katherine, and Theodore Sasson. "Crime in the Media." Crime in the
Media. Defending Justice: An Activist Resource Kit, 2005.
Coyne, Sarah M. "Does Media Violence Cause Violent Crime?" European
Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 13.3-4 (2007): 205-11.
Guin, Karen. "Study: Media Instructs But Doesn't Cause Criminal
Behavior." UCF Today. 10 Oct. 2013. Web. 22 Feb. 2015.
Tufekci, Zeynep. "The Media Needs to Stop Inspiring Copycat Murders. Here's
How." The Atlantic. Atlantic Media Company, 19 Dec. 2012.
"Violence in the Media Psychologists Study TV and Video Game Violence
for Potential Harmful Effects." American Psychological Association, Nov.
2013. Web. 22 Feb. 2015.