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The Future of the
Port Authority Bus Terminal

John J. Degnan
Chairman, The Port Authority of NY & NJ
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Port Authority Bus Terminal History

1950 1963 1979


To consolidate on-and Three parking levels North Wing Expansion
off-street bus operations added to the roof creating 50% more space
into a single terminal creating space for 1,000 to meet growing traffic
cars volume

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Today: The PABT is an
Essential Facility in an
Interconnected Regional
Network that Addresses
Commuter Demand

Commuter Bus Markets


12 Subway Lines
5 NYCT Bus Routes
Pedestrian access to
Midtown/Hudson Yards
Generalized costs, Based on NYBPM skims

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Buses: The Workhorse of
Trans-Hudson Travel
Trans-Hudson Travel below 60th Street
(249,000)

(456,000)

(246,000)

(194,000)

Today, over 1 million passengers per day cross


the Hudson River to & from below 60th St.
Source: 2016 PABT D&D Appendix A; 2015 Profile of the RITN; NYMTC Hub Bound Travel Report
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PABT: At and Beyond Capacity
Avg. Daily 1951 1969 2015 2040
Buses >5,000 8,000 7,800 9,100
Passengers 130,000 220,000 260,000 337,000
Above Capacity for Projected
Respective Facility Size Midtown Bus
Master Plan Patch.com

Activity has grown by 12% between 2011 & 2015


more than of the total growth projected in 2013 in
the Midtown Bus Master Plan .
Larger & heavier new bus designs put stress on an
aging facility & are constrained from accessing portions
of the Terminal & ramp structures.

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Pre-Planning for a New PABT
2013 - 2016 Midtown Bus Terminal Master Planning
2014 On-going $90 Million Quality of Commute Program
2015 2016 Trans-Hudson Commuting Capacity Study
2016 International Design & Deliverability Competition
2017 Inclusion of PABT Replacement Project in Approved 2017-
26 Capital Plan
2017 Authorization to begin 1st Phase of Planning Process &
Environmental Review

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Why a New PABT in Manhattan?
Bus network is flexible to changing demand buses serve non-rail accessible
markets
West-of-Hudson bus commuters collectively earn $9.5 billion a year, supporting
economic activity equivalent to 3% of NJs economy.
Access to expanding west-of-Hudson workforce is critical to NYCs
competitiveness as an office location.
The PABT is a resilient regional lifeline when the rail system is disrupted.

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The Planning for a New PABT will Consider:
Stakeholder Engagement & Input
Scalability
Connectivity to Other Modes
Economic Vitality
Efficiency
Land Use Availability
Innovative Strategies & Technologies
Environmental Considerations

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1916 Zoning full build out 55 million people1

1961 Zoning full build out 12 million people2

Current full build out is around 9.5 million people2

NYC population is at an all time high and growing towards 9 million

We have a Problem

1 = New York City Department of Planning Web Site


2 = New York City PlanYC 2007

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


How to house nine million:

More in same Space Up zone Make Land

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


Make land

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


Park Avenue in the Bronx

Site is publicly owned

Locations are accessible

Communities become connected

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


Morrisania Air Rights Houses

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


Existing Zoning

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


Adapt to varied context

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


Accessible transit
Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017
Initial build-out
Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017
Future investment
Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017
Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017
Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017
Prefabricated can span cut

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


Park Avenue in Manhattan

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


Applicable city-wide

100.8 Linear miles below grade


transportation infrastructure

127, 000,000 Square feet buildable

130,000 New apartments

390,000 Residents accommodated

That gets us to 9 million

Crain's Real Estate Conference | 14 June 2017


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REIMAGINING RIKERS ISLAND
June 2017
The Independent Commission sought to create a blueprint for an improved criminal justice system
reflecting our citys values of decency, dignity, and equal treatment before the law.

Chair: Hon. Jonathan Lippman, Former Chief Judge, NY Court of Appeals

Rethinking Incarceration The Future of Jails Reimagining the Island


Policy & procedural changes Design jail facilities to Assess reuse options for
to safely reduce number of enhance safety and security Rikers Island in the near term
people entering jail and of staff and inmates. Review and long term.
shorten time people remain relationship between jails &
there neighborhoods.

Chair: Nick Turner Chair: Michael Jacobson Chair: MaryAnne Gilmartin


Vera Institute of Justice CUNY Institute for State and Forest City Ratner Companies
Local Governance

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Through implementing a series of policy changes to promote a fairer and more efficient criminal
justice system, the jail population in New York City can be safely reduced from 9,500 to 4,500.

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Alternatives to
Arrest 3,000

9,500 Pretrial 1,000


Current Jail Reform 600
Case
Population Sentencing
Processing
Reform
~4,500
Reformed Jail
Population

Proposed Reforms
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Borough-based jail facilities with proximity to courthouses and state-of-the-art design can save $540
million annually through more efficient operations.

Annual Costs and Savings


for New Jail System
$1.6B

$1.1B

New Training/ More


Programming Efficient
$330M Staffing
$1.6B

New
Borough
Jails
$770M

Proposed facility in Brooklyn (left) and recently-built facilities in Denver (upper


right) and San Diego (lower right) demonstrate modern jail design. Operating Costs Operating Savings

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Reuse concepts for Rikers Island were evaluated based on their ability to generate public benefits.

How can reuse of Rikers Island generate the


greatest public benefit
given existing
physical and economic realities?

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Rikers Island is located in a complex context that presents both opportunities and challenges.

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Island Context
New York Citys future growth will be enabled by infrastructure renewal and growth in the supply of
jobs, housing, and amenities.

Rising affordability 2M tons of trash


crisis with 56% of sent to landfills
New Yorkers and 27M tons of
rent-burdened and sewage and
22% below stormwater were
poverty line untreated annually

Growth- 98% of energy


constrained derived from
infrastructure with non-renewable
2X national sources
average for flight
delays
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Concept 1 | Rikers Island is strategically positioned to support regional growth by accommodating
an expanded LaGuardia Airport and large-scale green infrastructure.

Third Runway

DSNY Composting Facility

Solar Field

Marine Transfer DEP Wastewater


Station Treatment Facility
New Terminal
Memorial and Public
Greenway
AirTrain Extension 47
Concept 2 | Rikers could accommodate next-generation clean energy and waste-to-energy uses
that could go even further in meeting the citys policy goals, absent an airport expansion.

Research Campus Power Storage


Urban Agriculture
DSNY Composting
Facility

Marine
Transfer
Station
Solar Field

Memorial and Public


Greenway
DSNY Waste-to-Energy DEP Wastewater Renovated
Facility Treatment Facility Bridge

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Each of the two concepts presents significant benefits for the City and the region, including job
creation, economic growth, and environmental improvements.

Create over Reduce waste to


50,000 new achieve 40% of
permanent jobs. Zero Waste goal.

Reduce greenhouse
Generate $7.5 billion emissions by the
in regional economic equivalent of 150,000
activity. cars off the road.

Accommodate 12 Generate
million additional renewable energy
passengers. to power 30,000
households.
Add 30 flights per
hour of airport Produce 100 MW of
capacity. solar capacity, 10%
of City goal. 49
Sources: OneNYC, 80x50 Roadmap, NY State Clean Energy Plan, City of NY
Replacing aging treatment plants with new facilities on Rikers Island could open up new land for
living, working, recreation, and supplying other critical infrastructure.

Hunts Point WWTP


Tallman Island WWTP

Wards Island WWTP

Bowery Bay WWTP

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Investment in a next-generation infrastructure island would require $15 to $22 billion in public and
private investment, representing a significant down payment on regional growth.

PROJECT COST BY CATEGORY

Concept 1 $1.5B $1B $9B $10.5B $22B

Concept 2 $0.5B $0.5B $14B $15B

Demolition & Site Preparation Transportation & Open Space Airport Next-Generation Infrastructure

PROJECT COST BY FUNDING SOURCE


$22B
Concept 1 $17B $5B

Concept 2 $11B $4B $15B

Net Public Cost Revenues & Averted Costs 51


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