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EE 556: Electrical

Engineering Safet
Conditions Conducive to
Accidents
&
Different Types of Accidents

Reporters:
Libeternos, Renor John
Pueblas, Janna Pauline
Rendon, Kenichi
Tango-an, Noel
Introduction

What is electricity?

Electricity is a natural energy force.


Electricity is also a man made energy
force.
It is essential to modern life and
taken for granted everyday.
Introduction

Electricity flows
through conductors.
Conductors include
metals, water, the
Earth and the human
body.
Electricity must have a
complete circuit or
path to flow.
Introduction
How electricity works?

When electrical tools are


working properly a complete
circuit is maintained between
the tool and the energy source.
However, if the tool is
damaged the person may
come in contact with the
electricity and can become a
path for the current.
The person will be shocked!
Conditions Conducive to Accidents
Improper grounding
Exposed electrical parts
Inadequate wiring
Damaged insulation
Overloaded circuits
Damaged tools and equipment
Wet conditions
Overhead power lines
Improper grounding

Grounding is the
process used to
eliminate unwanted
voltage.
A ground is a
physical electrical
connection to the
earth.
Improper grounding
Improper grounding

The ground pin


safely returns
leakage current to
ground.
Never remove the
ground pin
Improper grounding

Removing the
ground pin removes
an important safety
feature.
You can get
shocked!
Improper grounding
Exposed electrical parts

Exposed wires
or terminals are
hazardous.
Exposed electrical parts
Ex.
This electrical
panel has
missing circuit
breakers.
Never use a
panel that has
exposed wires
Outer
insulation on
electrical cords
must be intact.
Exposed electrical parts
On construction sites, temporary lighting must
be properly guarded and protected to avoid
contact with broken bulbs and avoid potential
shocks.
Inadequate Wiring

Use properly
rated extension
cords.
Make sure your
power tools are
being used with a
properly rated
extension cord.
Inadequate Wiring
DIFFERENT TYPES OF WIRES WITH THEIR
ELECTRICAL CURRENT RATING
Damaged Insulation

Defective or
inadequate insulation
is a hazard.
Insulation prevents
conductors from
contacting each other
or you.
Never hang extension
cords from nails or
sharp objects.
Overloaded Circuits
This is what happens if you dont use the
specified fuse wire or circuit breaker in
your house switch board.
Overloaded Circuits
Never overload an
outlet.
Do not use power
strips or surge
protectors on
construction sites.
Use a 3-way
extension with a
Ground Fault
Circuit Interrupter
(GFCI) instead.
Overloaded Circuits
A Class A Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) works by detecting
any loss of electrical current in a circuit (e.g., it will trip at a maximum of
6mA). When a loss is detected, the GFCI turns the electricity off before
severe injuries or electrocution can occur. A painful non-fatal shock may
occur during the time that it takes for the GFCI to cut off the electricity so
it is important to use the GFCI as an extra protective measure rather
than a replacement for safe work practices.
Damaged Tools and Equipment
Do not use
electric tools
that are
damaged.
You may
receive a
shock or be
electrocuted
.
Damaged Tools and Equipment

Double
insulated tools
are labelled.
It will be
marked
Double
Insulated.
It will have the
following
symbol:
Wet Conditions

Wet
conditions
are
hazardous.
Damaged
insulation
increases
the hazard.
Wet Conditions

Always avoid
using tools in wet
locations.
Water increases
the risk of electric
shock.
Overhead Power Lines

Survey the site


for overhead
power lines.
Never store
materials or
equipment under
overhead power
lines.
Overhead Power Lines

Maintain a distance of
at least 10 between
tools and equipment
and overhead power
lines.
Shocks and
electrocutions occur
where physical barriers
are not in place to
prevent contact with
the wires.
Overhead Power Lines
overhead power
line explosion:
Stay safe in the workplace
Different Types of Accidents
Because construction work often includes
starting from the ground up to build
something new, there are hazards present
that can jeopardize the health and safety of
all workers on the job. As construction
moves along, there are many new things
added including electrical wiring and
electrical boxes. For this reason, electrical
accidents are commonplace in the
construction industry. However, when
electricity goes wrong, construction workers
are often killed instantly.
Different Types of Accidents
Electrical burn
accidents that cause
serious injuries can
occur at home or in
the workplace.
According to the
Consumer Product
Safety Commission
(CPSC), approximately
40,000 residential
fires per year are
caused by electrical
accidents.
Different Types of Accidents
There are three main
types of electrical
accidents:
Electric shock: occurs when an extremity such as
a finger, hand, or arm is placed across an electric
current. The body is a good conductor of
electricity because it is made up of mostly water.
Electric shock can be mild, moderate, or severe.
A mild electric shock leaves a slight tingling
sensation. Moderate electric shock causes the
muscles to contract and it may be difficult to pull
away from the electric current. Severe electric
shock causes respiratory or heart failure.
Different Types of Accidents

Electrical burn: occurs when severe


electric shock causes tissue to burn.
Electrical burns can be external or
internal. Internal burns occur when
the electric current takes a path
through bone and burns deep tissue.
Different Types of Accidents

Electrical fires: occur when electric


current ignites flammable materials.
Electrical fires are extremely
dangerous because putting them out
with water may expose a person to a
higher risk of electric shock.
ELECTRICAL ACCIDENT CAUSES
Old wiring
Electric cords that run under carpeting
Flammable materials left near exposed
electrical wiring in the workplace
Loose connectors
Poor wiring: substandard wiring can lead to
electrical fires and electric shock
Lack of preventive devices such as ground
fault circuit interrupters (a device that
monitors and shuts off electric current in the
event that the flow fluctuates), three-
pronged outlets, and polarized plugs
PREVENTING ELECTRICAL ACCIDENTS
Replacing old and damaged wiring
Hiring a qualified electrician
Not overloading outlets
Not using frayed or damaged electric
cords
Using the proper wattage light bulbs in
light fixtures
Installing ground fault circuit
interrupters