CURTAIN WALL

STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

DEFINATION
In strictest architectural parlance, a “curtainwall” is any non-load-bearing
exterior wall that hangs (like a curtain) from the face of floor slabs, regardless
of construction or cladding material. However, in common usage, the term
curtainwall usually refers to aluminium- framed systems carrying glass,
panels, louvers, or occasionally, granite or marble.

A curtain wall is defined as thin, usually
aluminium-framed wall, containing in-
fills of glass, metal panels, or thin stone.
The framing is attached to the building
structure and does not carry the floor or
roof loads of the building.

controlled environmental conditions. under highly variable conditions. rather than in a factory with its ideal tooling. but they must be assembled on site. Cladding System The Curtain Wall The Curtain Wall The first steel-framed skyscrapers. and lower wage rates. . The name “curtain wall” derives from the idea that the wall is thin and “hangs” like a curtain on the structural frame. Stick systems have a high degree of ability to adjust to unforeseen site conditions. built late in the 19th century. introduced the concept of the curtain wall. an exterior cladding supported at each story by the frame.

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it can be thin and light in weight regardless of the height of the building. but all are supported by the frame of the building. and others are prefabricated. because it bears no vertical load. . They may be either constructed in place or prefabricated. Curtain walls may be constructed of any noncombustible material that is suitable for exposure to the weather. The principal advantage of the curtain wall is that. Curtain walls may be made of masonry and concrete or made of metal and glass. Some types of walls are constructed in place. Cladding System The earliest curtain walls were constructed of masonry. which may become prohibitively t hick and weighty at the base of a very tall building. as compared to a masonry load-bearing wall.

Cladding System Modes of Assembly Metal curtain wall systems can be classified according to their degree or mode of assembly at the time of installation on the building. . Many metal-and-glass curtain walls are furnished as stick systems whose principal components are metal mullions and rectangular panels of glass and spandrel material that are assembled in place on the building.

Cladding System The unit system of curtain wall installation takes full advantage of factory assembly and minimizes on site labor. The unit-and-mullion system which is seldom used today. . offers a middle ground between the stick and unit systems. but the units require more space during shipping and more protection from damage than stick system components.

which makes it advantageous only for a building that requires a large number of identical panels. Its advantages and disadvantages are similar to those of the unit system. but its production involves the higher tooling costs of a custom-made die or mold. Cladding System The panel system is made up of homogenous units that are formed from metal sheet. .

A custom design must be created for each project because there is no standard column or floor spacing for buildings. Special care is required in detailing the spandrel panel support to ensure that the panels do not deflect when loads are applied to the spandrel beams of the building frame. . as the previously described systems do. Cladding System The column-cover-and-spandrel system emphasizes the structural module of the building rather than creating its own grid on the facade. otherwise. the window strips could be subjected to loadings that would deform the mullions and crack the glass.

DIFFERENT TYPES OF CURTAIN WALL .

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AN CH OR AG E .

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