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TECHNOLOGY

A Must for the Future

By: Katherine Knapp


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Supports Computer-
Importance of
Instructional based
Technology
Strategies Instruction

Development
Technology:
of Higher-
Here to Stay
Order Skills

Enhance
Benefits of
Student
Technology
Achievement
HOW IMPORTANT IS TECHNOLOGY?

The top 10 in-demand jobs in 2010


did not exist in 2004.

We are currently preparing our


students for jobs that dont exist.

With technologies that havent


been invented yet

In order to solve problems that we


dont even know are problems yet.
TECHNOLOGY: HERE TO STAY
Students find technology no more intimidating than using a VCR or a
toaster

Students watch much television than their parents did at the same age

Students are active participants, not just viewers or listeners

Prepares students for participation in a technological world


Construct
knowledge
Perform
Create
simulations to
proposals
develop skills

Distance
Keep records
learning

Global
collaboration
Ability to
gather info Technology for lifelong
learning and
work
ENHANCE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Motivation &
Engagement

Student- World Class


centered Education

Equip Students
for Life
DEVELOPMENT OF HIGHER-ORDER SKILLS
Software
supports
curriculum

Valuable thinking tools


among technology
applications

Technology tools for constructing


artifacts and electronic
information and communication
resources

Apply problem-solving processes and apply


techonolgy tools to develop solutions

Augment skills to convert data to information and


transform information into knowledge

Apply content knowledge in a variety of ways

Enables development of critical thinking skills


SUPPORTS INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Category Average Effect Associated
Size Percentile Gain
Identifying 1.61 45
similarities and Teachers should:
differences
Summarizing and 1.00 34 Focus on the strategies
note taking
Focus on the available
Reinforcing effort .80 29
and providing technology
recognition
Homework and .77 28
Focus on the unit
practice Build lessons on a solid,
Nonlinguistic .75 27
representation foundation of effective
Cooperative .73 27 strategies
learning
Setting goals and .61 23 Add appropriate
providing technologies
feedback
Generating and .61 23 Apply strategies to ensure
testing high-quality instruction
hypotheses
Cues, questions .59 22
and advance
organizers
Meta-Analysis Instuction Level # of Studies Percentile Gain Over
Students who

KULIKS META-ANALYSIS STUDY


Analyzed Control Group
used
Bangert-Drowns, J. Secondary 51 10
Kulik & C. Kulik computer
(1985) based
Burns & Bozeman Elementary & 44 14
(1981) Secondary
instruction
Cohen & Dacanay Health Professions 38 18
scored at the
(1991) Education 64th
Hartley (1978) Elementary & 33 16 percentile on
Secondary Math
achievement
Fletcher (1990) Higher Edcuation & 28 19
Adult Training tests
C. Kulik & J. Kulik College 119 11
(1986) Students
C. Kulik, J. Kulik & Adult Education 30 15 learn more in
Shwalb (1986)
less time
J. Kulik, C. Kulik & Elementary 44 16
Bangert-Drowns
(1985) Students like
Niemiec & Walbert Elementary 48 14 their classes
(1985)
Roblyer (1988) Elementary to Adult 82 12
more and
Education development
Schmidt, Weinstein, Special Education 18 22 more positive
Niemiec & Walberg
(1985)
attitudes

Willett, Yamashita & Pre-College Science 11 9


Anderson (1983)
THANK YOU