EVERYONE NEEDS A MENTOR

PRESENTERS
Ajay kumar Pragnya Rath Vishal Saran

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
David Clutter buck
David Clutter buck is one of Europe's most prolific and well-known management writer and thinker. He has written more than 40 books, including Managing Work-Life Balance and Learning Alliances. Everyone Needs a Mentor is now the classic book on the subject. and he is recognised as the UK's leading expert on mentoring.

WHO IS A MENTOR
A guide A tutor A coach A confidant Or A role model

MENTORING
A process in which one person [ mentor ] is responsible for overseeing the career and developing of another person [ protégé ] outside the normal manager / subordinate relationship.

Objective of the mentoring is to ensure that this valuable development tool is used for the good of the company as a whole, rather that for a small number of favourites.

.... MENTORING
Mentored people reach senior level Unable people also gets benefit of mentoring

Mentoring may also occur between top and middle management Mentoring need not be once in a lifetime

HOW MENTORING BENEFITS THE

INDIVIDUAL
Benefits to the protégé :
Easier induction for those coming straight from university or moving to a new country Improved self confidence Learning to cope with the formal and informal structure of the company Career advice and advancement Benefits for the less talented employee

..... HOW MENTORING BENEFITS THE

INDIVIDUAL
Benefits to the mentor :
Impr v Incr s j b s tisf ti

peer recognition

Career advancement

HOW MENTORING BENEFITS THE COMPANY
Benefits to the Company :
Recruitment and Induction Improved motivation a stable corporate culture Leadership development Improved communication

CHOOSING THE MENTOR
MENTOR
Managers relationship Encourage the protégé Nurture the protégé Teach the protégé Offer mutual respect Respondent to the protégé need

CHOOSING THE PROTEGE
STRONG INTERPERSONAL SKILLS ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE DIPLOMATICALLY & EFFECTIVELY TALENTED, POTENTIAL & HIGHLY RECEPTIVE ABLE TO SHOW INSIGHT & SENSITIVITY FLEXIBLE, SELF-AWARE &CONSCIENTIOUS POSITIVE MINDED, NON-DEFENSIVE & WELL ORGANISED WILLINGNESS TO SPEND EXTRA TIME & ENERGY ON THE PROGRAMME ABLE TO LAUGH AT MISTAKES & A FAST LEARNER

SETTING UP THE MENTORING PROGRAMME
People involved In the process
The r t

Essential principle to maintain the process
Carefully atching the r t gé & ent r

Demystify the ment ring r gramme

The

ent r
Management c mmitment & artici ati n

The line The trainer

nager

Acceptance f the time inv lved Ad pting the pr gramme in c mpany¶s devel pment pr gramme

RUNNING THE MENTORING PROGRAMME
Introducing the protégé to the other parallel function or department Identify A ign challenging project to the protégé mentor

Sharing the project etween protégé Increa e in protégé¶ company

i i ility in required area of

Self-study programme for the protégé.

PHASES OF THE MENTORING
RELATIONSHIP
In the early stages of protégé s career the mentor:
Offers friendship. Acts as a role model. Accepts and confirms the protégés notions about his own identity. Supports him and gives him confidence and a feeling of competence.

Generally, each relationship progresses through four distinct stages: ‡ The start of the relationship: During the first six months to a year. ‡ The middle period: Lasts for two to five years ‡ Dissolving the relationship: After two to five years ‡ Restarting the relationship

PROBLEMS OF THE MENTORING RELATIONSHIP
Some of the most frequent problems include:
Power Alignments: It leads to new alliances which may lead to corporate politics as well. Work organization problems: The protégé may sometimes channel his energies into activities that he thinks will please his mentor, at the expense of the daily routines of the job

‡ Problems it t e selection process: The company should: Make sure everyone knows the criteria for selection Demonstrate that mentoring was just one route to advancement among many, and Consider unsuccessful candidates¶ reactions at a much earlier stage. ‡ Problems bet een mentor and prot gé: One common cause of failure, for example, is a simple mismatch between the protégé and mentor. They may not be able to feel at ease with one another

The NHS in Wales has encountered the following difficulties with mentoring: Time availability Lethargy Flexibility Over Caution Personality Clashes Lack of confidentiality Balancing professionalism and friendship

THE SPECIAL ISSUE OF
MALE/FEMALE MENTORING
Potential problems with male/female mentoring
‡ Bet een the protégé and the mentor: Sexual tensions between the two can inhibit the relationship and make it less rewarding than mentoring between two of the same sex. ‡ Bet een the spouses and the mentoring pair: The spouse often feels excluded by the closeness of the relationship.

‡ Bet een the company and the mentoring pair: Sexual gossips can kill a mentoring relationship before it gets going. Many potential male/female mentoring relationships never happen because of the fear of office gossip. ‡ The Solutions At all levels of the company and between the protégé and the mentor there must be: Communication Publicity Clarity Involvement

CONCLUSION
All good relationships ome to an end Good protégés often make good mentors Old stages an enefit from mentors too How to find a mentor when the organi ation doesn¶t have formal mentoring programme : Target one or two executives as potential mentors Make ourself visible how ou have ambition and want to improve our abilities Ask the potential manager formall , in person, to be our mentor.

a. b. c. d.

Successful mentoring programmes:
Have top management support. Are parts of a larger human resources/career development effort? Consist only of volunteer participation. Tend to be made up of relatively short phases. Select mentors and protégés carefully Have structured flexibility Make everyone aware of the problems that may arise Have an effective monitoring system Start small and grow Orient both mentors and protégés before the relationship begins.

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