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Excel Lesson 1

Microsoft Excel Basics

Microsoft Office 2010
Introductory

1 Pasewark & Pasewark
Objectives

 Define the terms spreadsheet and
worksheet.
 Identify the parts of a worksheet.
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 Start Excel, open an existing workbook, and
save a workbook.
 Move the active cell in a worksheet.

2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Objectives (continued)

 Select cells and enter data in a worksheet.
 Edit and replace data in cells.
 Zoom, preview, and print a worksheet.
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 Close a workbook and exit Excel.

3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary

 active cell  Formula Bar
 active worksheet  landscape orientation
 adjacent range  Microsoft Excel 2010
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 cell (Excel)
 cell reference  Name Box
 column  nonadjacent range
 formula  portrait orientation

4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary (continued)

 range
 range reference
 row
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 sheet tab
 spreadsheet
 workbook
 worksheet

5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Introduction to Spreadsheets

 Microsoft Excel 2010 is the spreadsheet
program in Microsoft Office 2010.
 A spreadsheet is a grid of rows and columns
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in which you enter text, numbers, and the
results of calculations.
 In Excel, a computerized spreadsheet is
called a worksheet. The file used to store
worksheets is called a workbook.
6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Starting Excel

 You start Excel from the Start menu in
Windows. Click the Start button, click All
Programs, click Microsoft Office, and then
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click Microsoft Excel 2010.
 The Excel program window has the same
basic parts as all Office programs: the title
bar, the Quick Access Toolbar, the Ribbon,
Backstage view, and the status bar.

7 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Starting Excel (continued)

 Excel program window
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8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Exploring the Parts of the
Workbook

 Each workbook contains three worksheets by
default. The worksheet displayed in the work
area is the active worksheet.
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 Columns appear vertically and are identified
by letters. Rows appear horizontally and are
identified by numbers.
 A cell is the intersection of a row and a
column. Each cell is identified by a unique
cell reference.
9 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Exploring the Parts of the
Workbook (continued)

 The cell in the worksheet in which you can type
data is called the active cell.
 The Name Box, or cell reference area, displays
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the cell reference of the active cell.
 The Formula Bar displays a formula when a
worksheet cell contains a calculated value.
 A formula is an equation that calculates a new
value from values currently in a worksheet.

10 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Opening an Existing Workbook

 Opening a workbook means loading an
existing workbook file from a drive into the
program window.
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 To open an existing workbook, you click the
File tab on the Ribbon to display Backstage
view, and then click Open in the navigation
bar. The Open dialog box appears.

11 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Opening an Existing Workbook
(continued)

 Frogs workbook open in Excel
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Saving a Workbook

 The Save command saves an existing
workbook, using its current name and save
location.
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 The Save As command lets you save a
workbook with a new name or to a new
location.

13 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Moving the Active Cell in a
Worksheet

 The easiest way to change the active cell in a
worksheet is to move the pointer to the cell
you want to make active and click.
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 You can display different parts of the
worksheet by using the mouse to drag the
scroll box in the scroll bar to another position.
 You can also move the active cell to different
parts of the worksheet using the keyboard or
the Go To command.
14 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Moving the Active Cell in a
Worksheet (continued)

 Keys for moving the active cell in a worksheet
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Selecting a Group of Cells

 A group of selected cells is called a range.
The range is identified by its range reference,
for example, A3:C5.
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 In an adjacent range, all cells touch each
other and form a rectangle.
– To select an adjacent range, click the cell in a
corner of the range, drag the pointer to the cell in
the opposite corner of the range, and release the
mouse button.
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Selecting a Group of Cells
(continued)

 A nonadjacent range includes two or more
adjacent ranges and selected cells.
– To select a nonadjacent range, select the first
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adjacent range or cell, press the Ctrl key as you
select the other cells or ranges you want to
include, and then release the Ctrl key and the
mouse button.

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Entering Data in a Cell

 Worksheet cells can contain text, numbers,
or formulas.
– Text is any combination of letters and numbers
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and symbols.
– Numbers are values, dates, or times.
– Formulas are equations that calculate a value.
 You enter data in the active cell.

18 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Changing Data in a Cell

 You can edit, replace, or clear data.
 You can edit cell data in the Formula Bar or
in the cell. The contents of the active cell
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always appear in the Formula Bar.
 To replace cell data, select the cell, type new
data, and press the Enter button on the
Formula Bar or the Enter key or the Tab key.
 To clear the active cell, you can use the
Ribbon, the keyboard, or the mouse.
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Searching for Data

 The Find command locates data in a
worksheet, which is particularly helpful when
a worksheet contains a large amount of data.
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You can use the Find command to locate
words or parts of words.
 The Replace command is an extension of the
Find command. Replacing data substitutes
new data for the data that the Find command
locates.
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Searching for Data (continued)

 Find and Replace options
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21 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Zooming a Worksheet

 You can change the magnification of a
worksheet using the Zoom controls on the
status bar.
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 The default magnification for a workbook is
100%.
 For a closer view of a worksheet, click the
Zoom In button or drag the Zoom slider to
the right to increase the zoom percentage.
22 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Zooming a Worksheet (continued)

 Zoom dialog box and controls
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Previewing and Printing a
Worksheet

 You can print a worksheet by clicking the File
tab on the Ribbon, and then clicking Print in
the navigation bar to display the Print tab.
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 The Print tab enables you to choose print
settings.
 The Print tab also allows you to preview your
pages before printing.

24 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Closing a Workbook and Exiting
Excel

 You can close a workbook by clicking the File
tab on the Ribbon, and then clicking Close in
the navigation bar. Excel remains open.
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 To exit the workbook, click the Exit command
in the navigation bar.

25 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
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Pasewark & Pasewark 26
Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary

In this lesson, you learned:
 The primary purpose of a spreadsheet is to solve
problems involving numbers. The advantage of using
a computer spreadsheet is that you can complete
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complex and repetitious calculations quickly and
accurately.
 A worksheet consists of columns and rows that
intersect to form cells. Each cell is identified by a cell
reference, which combines the letter of the column
and the number of the row.
27 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 The first time you save a workbook, the Save As dialog
box opens so you can enter a descriptive name and
select a save location. After that, you can use the Save
command in Backstage view or the Save button on the
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Quick Access Toolbar to save the latest version of the
workbook.
 You can change the active cell in the worksheet by
clicking the cell with the pointer, pressing keys, or using
the scroll bars. The Go To dialog box lets you quickly
move the active cell anywhere in the worksheet.
28 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 A group of selected cells is called a range. A range is
identified by the cells in the upper-left and lower-right
corners of the range, separated by a colon. To select
an adjacent range, drag the pointer across the
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rectangle of cells you want to include. To select a
nonadjacent range, select the first adjacent range,
hold down the Ctrl key, select each additional cell or
range, and then release the Ctrl key.

29 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 Worksheet cells can contain text, numbers, and
formulas. After you enter data or a formula in a cell,
you can change the cell contents by editing,
replacing, or deleting it.
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 You can search for specific characters in a
worksheet. You can also replace data you have
searched for with specific characters.

30 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 The zoom controls on the status bar enable you to
enlarge or reduce the magnification of the worksheet
in the worksheet window.
 Before you print a worksheet, you should check the
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page preview to see how the printed pages will look.
 When you finish your work session, you should save
your final changes and close the workbook.

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Excel Lesson 2
Changing the Appearance
of a Worksheet

Microsoft Office 2010
Introductory

32 Pasewark & Pasewark
Objectives

 Change column widths and row heights.
 Position data within a cell by aligning,
wrapping, rotating, and indenting.
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 Change the appearance of cells using fonts,
font sizes, font styles, colors, and borders.
 Designate the number format used for data
stored in a cell.

33 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Objectives (continued)

 Use the Format Painter to copy formatting
from one cell to another.
 Apply and clear cell styles.
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 Find and replace cell formats.

34 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary

 align  font
 AutoFit  font size
 border  font style
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 cell style  Format Painter
 clear  indent
 column heading  merge
 fill  number format

35 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary (continued)

 orientation
 row heading
 style
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 theme
 truncate
 wrap text

36 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Resizing Columns and Rows

 Resize a column by placing the pointer on
the right edge of the column heading and
dragging. For a precise column width, enter
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the value in the Column Width dialog box.
 To change the row height, drag the border of
the row heading or enter a height in the Row
Height dialog box.

37 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Resizing Columns and Rows
(continued)

 AutoFit determines the best width for a
column or the best height for a row.
 Place the pointer on the right edge of the
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column heading (or below the row heading)
until the pointer changes to a double-headed
arrow. Then, double-click to resize the
column or row to the best fit.

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Positioning Data Within a Cell

 By default, text you enter in a cell is lined up
along the bottom-left side of the cell, and
numbers you enter in a cell are lined up
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along the bottom-right.
 However, you can position data within a cell
in a variety of ways using the buttons on the
Home tab of the Ribbon.

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Positioning Data Within a Cell
(continued)

 Positioning data within a cell
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40 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Positioning Data Within a Cell
(continued)

 You can align the contents of a cell
horizontally and vertically within the cell. To
change the alignment of a cell, select the
cell and then click an alignment button on the
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Home tab.
 You can also merge cells which combines
them into one cell.
 Indent data within cells by using the Increase
Indent and Decrease Indent buttons on the
Home tab.
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Positioning Data Within a Cell
(continued)

 You can change a cell’s text orientation.
 Text that doesn’t fit in a cell is displayed in
the next cell, if empty. If the next cell contains
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data, any text that does not fit is truncated,
or hidden from view.
 To see all the text stored in a cell you can
wrap text. The row height increases to
display additional lines.
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Changing the Appearance of Cells

 A theme is a preset collection of design
elements, including fonts, colors, and effects.
 As you format cells, Live Preview shows the
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results of the different formatting options.
 A font is the design of text. The default font
for cells is Calibri.
 Font size determines the height of
characters in points (default size for cells is
11 points).
43 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Changing the Appearance of Cells
(continued)

 Font gallery
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44 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Changing the Appearance of Cells
(continued)

 Bold, italic, and underlining can add emphasis to
the contents of a cell. These features are
referred to as font styles.
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 You can use color to emphasize cells. The
default font color is black and the default fill
(background) color is white. Both colors can be
changed.
 You can add emphasis to a cell by applying a
border (or line) around its edges.
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Changing the Appearance of Cells
(continued)

 Number formats change the way data looks
in a cell. The actual content you entered is
not changed.
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 The default number format is General, which
displays numbers the way you enter them.

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Changing the Appearance of Cells
(continued)

 Number formats
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47 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Changing the Appearance of Cells
(continued)

 The Format Painter enables you to copy
formatting from one cell and paste it to other
cells without pasting the first cell’s contents.
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 The format cells dialog box provides access
to all the formatting options available on the
ribbon, as well as some additional options.

48 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Using Styles to Format Cells

 A style is a combination of formatting
characteristics.
 A cell style is a collection of formatting
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characteristics you apply to a cell or range of
data.
 To remove, or clear, all the formatting
applied to a cell or range of cells, use the
Clear button on the Home tab.
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Using Styles to Format Cells
(continued)

 Cell styles gallery
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50 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary

In this lesson, you learned:
 If data does not fit in a cell, you can resize the
columns and rows to make the data easier to read.
 You can align, indent, rotate, wrap text, and merge
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cells to reposition data in worksheet cells.
 You can change the appearance of cells to make the
worksheet easier to read or to create a specific look
and feel. Choose the appropriate fonts, font sizes, font
styles, font and fill colors, and borders.

51 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 Using a number format enables you to change how
a number is displayed in a cell. No matter which
number format you select, the actual value stored in
the cell does not change. You can see this by
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comparing the formatted value in the active cell with
the value displayed in the Formula Bar.
 Format Painter copies all the formatting from one
cell and pastes it to another cell or range without
copying the contents of the cell.
52 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 The Format Cells dialog box provides all the
number, alignment, font, border, and fill formatting
options available on the Ribbon, as well as some
additional options.
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 A style is a combination of formatting
characteristics, such as alignment, font, font size,
font color, fill color, and borders that you can apply
simultaneously. The Cell Styles gallery lets you
quickly apply a style to selected cells or create a
new style.
53 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 You can use the Find and Replace dialog box to
find and replace cell formatting.
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Excel Lesson 3
Organizing the Worksheet

Microsoft Office 2010
Introductory

55 Pasewark & Pasewark
Objectives

 Copy and move data in a worksheet.
 Use the drag-and-drop method and Auto Fill
options to add data to cells.
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 Insert and delete rows, columns, and cells.
 Freeze panes in a worksheet.
 Split a worksheet window.

56 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Objectives (continued)

 Check spelling in a worksheet.
 Prepare a worksheet for printing.
 Insert headers and footers in a worksheet.
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57 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary

 automatic page break  header
 copy  manual page break
 cut  margin
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 fill handle  Normal view
 filling  Office Clipboard
 footer (Clipboard)
 freeze panes  Page Break Preview

58 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary (continued)

 Page Layout view
 paste
 print area
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 print titles
 scale
 split

59 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Copying and Moving Cells

 Copying duplicates the cell or range in
another location, while also leaving the cell in
its original location.
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 Cutting removes a cell or range from its
original location in the worksheet.
 Pasting places the cell or range in another
location.

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Copying and Moving Cells
(continued)

 To copy a cell or range, use buttons in the
Clipboard group on the Home tab.
 The copied data is placed on the Office
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Clipboard. The Office Clipboard (or
Clipboard) is a temporary storage area for
up to 24 selections you copy or cut.
 To move a cell or range, you use the Cut
button, followed by the Paste button.
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Copying and Moving Cells
(continued)

 Range copied to the Clipboard
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Copying and Moving Cells
(continued)

 You can quickly move or copy data using the
drag-and-drop method. First, select the cell
or range, then drag them to a new location.
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 To copy cells, press and hold the Ctrl key.
 Filling copies a cell’s contents and/or
formatting into an adjacent cell or range.
 You can use the fill handle to help with
copying cells and also to continue a series of
text items, numbers, or dates.
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Inserting and Deleting Rows,
Columns, and Cells

 To insert a row, click the row heading to
select the row where you want the new row
to appear. Then, click the Insert button on the
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Home tab.
 To insert a column, click the column heading
to select the column where you want the new
column to appear. Then, click the Insert
button.

64 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Inserting and Deleting Rows,
Columns, and Cells (continued)

 To delete a row or column, click the appropriate
row or column heading and then click the Delete
button on the Home tab.
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 Use the buttons in the Cells group on the Home
tab to insert and delete cells.

Insert dialog box

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Freezing Panes in a Worksheet

 You can view two parts of a worksheet at
once by freezing panes.
 When you freeze panes, you select which
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rows and/or columns of the worksheet
remain visible on the screen as the rest of
the worksheet scrolls.

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Splitting a Worksheet Window

 Splitting divides the worksheet window into
two or four panes that you can scroll
independently.
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 This enables you to see different parts of a
worksheet at the same time.

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Splitting a Worksheet Window
(continued)

 Worksheet window split into horizontal panes
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Checking Spelling in a Worksheet

 To find and correct spelling errors, use the
Spelling command on the Review tab.
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Preparing a Worksheet for Printing

 So far, you have worked in Normal view,
which is the best view for entering and
formatting data in a worksheet.
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 Page Layout view shows how the worksheet
will appear on paper, which is helpful when
you prepare a worksheet for printing.
 The margin is the blank space around the
top, bottom, left, and right sides of a page.
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Preparing a Worksheet for Printing
(continued)

 Margins menu
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Preparing a Worksheet for Printing
(continued)

 By default, Excel is set to print pages in
portrait orientation. Worksheets printed in
portrait orientation are longer than they are
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wide. In contrast, worksheets printed in
landscape orientation are wider than they are
long.
 The print area consists of the cells and
ranges designated for printing.

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Preparing a Worksheet for Printing
(continued)

 Excel inserts an automatic page break
whenever it runs out of room on a page. You
can also insert a manual page break to start
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a new page.
 The simplest way to adjust page breaks is in
Page Break Preview. On the status bar,
click the Page Break Preview button to
switch to this view.

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Preparing a Worksheet for Printing
(continued)

 Scaling resizes a worksheet to print on a
specific number of pages. The Scale to Fit
group contains the three options shown below.
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Scale to Fit group on the Page Layout tab

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Preparing a Worksheet for Printing
(continued)

 By default, gridlines, row numbers, and
column letters appear in the worksheet but
not on the printed page. You can choose to
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show or hide gridlines and headings in a
worksheet or on the printed page.
 Print titles are designated rows and/or
columns in a worksheet that are printed on
each page.

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Inserting Headers and Footers

 A header is text that is printed in the top
margin of each page. A footer is text that is
printed in the bottom margin of each page.
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Completed Header section

76 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary

In this lesson, you learned:
 You can copy or move data to another part of the
worksheet. You can use the Copy, Cut, and Paste
buttons, the drag-and-drop method, and the fill handle
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to copy and move data in a worksheet. These tools
save time by eliminating the need to retype data.
 As you build a worksheet, you may need to insert a
row or column to enter more data, or delete a row or
column of unnecessary data. You can also insert or
delete specific cells within a worksheet.
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Summary (continued)

 When a worksheet becomes large, the column or row
labels can scroll out of view as you work on other parts
of the worksheet. To keep selected rows and columns
on the screen as the rest of the worksheet scrolls, you
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can freeze panes.
 Splitting a large worksheet enables you to view and
work in different parts of a worksheet at once, in two or
four panes that you can scroll independently.
 You can check a worksheet for possible misspellings
and correct them using the Spelling dialog box.
78 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 When you are ready to print a worksheet, switching
from Normal view to Page Layout view can be
helpful. You can modify how a worksheet appears on
the printed page by increasing or decreasing the
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margins, changing the page orientation, designating
a print area, inserting page breaks, scaling, showing
or hiding gridlines and headings, and specifying print
titles.

79 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 Headers and footers are useful for adding identifying
text at the top and bottom of the printed page.
Common elements include your name, the page
number, the current date, the workbook file name,
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and the worksheet name.

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Excel Lesson 4
Entering Worksheet Formulas

Microsoft Office 2010
Introductory

81 Pasewark & Pasewark
Objectives

 Enter and edit formulas.
 Distinguish between relative, absolute, and
mixed cell references.
Excel Lesson 1

 Use the point-and-click method to enter
formulas.
 Use the Sum button to add values in a range.

82 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Objectives (continued)

 Preview a calculation.
 Display formulas instead of results in a
worksheet.
Excel Lesson 1

 Manually calculate formulas.

83 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary

 absolute cell reference  operator
 formula  order of evaluation
 manual calculation  point-and-click method
Excel Lesson 1

 mixed cell reference  relative cell reference
 operand  Sum button

84 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
What Are Formulas?

 The equation used to calculate values based
on numbers entered in cells is called a
formula.
Excel Lesson 1

 Each formula begins with an equal sign (=).
 The results of the calculation appear in the
cell in which the formula is entered.

85 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
What Are Formulas? (continued)

 Formula and formula reset
Excel Lesson 1

86 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Entering a Formula

 Worksheet formulas consist of two components:
– operands
– operators
 An operand is a constant (text or number) or cell
Excel Lesson 1

reference used in a formula.
 An operator is a symbol that indicates the type of
calculation to perform on the operands, such as a
plus sign (+) for addition.

87 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Entering a Formula (continued)

 Mathematical operators
Excel Lesson 1

88 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Entering a Formula (continued)

 A formula with multiple operators is calculated
using the order of evaluation.
– Contents within parentheses (beginning with
Excel Lesson 1

innermost) are evaluated first.
– Mathematical operators are evaluated in a specific
order. (Shown in table on next slide).
– If operators have the same order of evaluation, the
equation is evaluated from left to right.

89 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Entering a Formula (continued)

 Order of evaluation
Excel Lesson 1

90 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Editing Formulas

 If you enter a formula with an incorrect
structure in a cell, Excel opens a dialog box
that explains the error and provides a
Excel Lesson 1

possible correction.

Formula error message

91 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Editing Formulas (continued)

 If you discover that you need to make a
correction, you can edit the formula.
 Click the cell with the formula you want to
Excel Lesson 1

edit. Press the F2 key or double-click the cell
to enter editing mode or click in the Formula
Bar.

92 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Comparing Relative, Absolute, and
Mixed Cell References

 A relative cell reference adjusts to its new
location when copied or moved to another
cell.
Excel Lesson 1

 Absolute cell references do not change
when copied or moved to a new cell.
 Cell references that contain both relative and
absolute references are called mixed cell
references.
– References preceded by a dollar sign do not change.

93 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Comparing Relative, Absolute, and
Mixed Cell References (continued)

 Mixed cell references
Excel Lesson 1

94 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Creating Formulas Quickly

 You can include cell references in a formula
by using the point-and-click method to click
each cell rather than typing a cell reference.
Excel Lesson 1

 Worksheet users frequently need to add long
columns or rows of numbers. To use the
Sum button, click the cell where you want
the total to appear, and then click the Sum
button.

95 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Previewing Calculations

 When you select a range that contains
numbers, the status bar shows the results of
common calculations for the range.
Excel Lesson 1

 By default, these calculations display the
average value in the selected range, a count
of the number of values in the selected
range, and a sum of the values in the
selected range.

96 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Previewing Calculations
(continued)

 Summary calculation options for the status bar
Excel Lesson 1

97 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Showing Formulas in the
Worksheet

 At times you may find it simpler to organize
formulas and detect errors when formulas
are displayed in their cells.
Excel Lesson 1

 To do this, click the Formulas tab on the
Ribbon, and then, in the Formula Auditing
group, click the Show Formulas button. The
formulas replace the formula results in the
worksheet.

98 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Calculating Formulas Manually

 When you need to edit a worksheet with
many formulas, you can specify manual
calculation, which lets you determine when
Excel Lesson 1

Excel calculates the formulas.
 The Formulas tab on the Ribbon contains all
the buttons you need when working with
manual calculations.

99 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary

 Formulas are equations used to calculate values
and display them in a cell. Formulas can include
values referenced in other cells of the worksheet.
Each formula begins with an equal sign and
Excel Lesson 1

contains at least two operands and one operator.
 Formulas can include more than one operator.
The order of evaluation determines the sequence
used to calculate the value of a formula.
10
0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 When you enter a formula with an incorrect
structure, Excel can correct the error for you, or
you can choose to edit it yourself. To edit a
formula, click the cell with the formula and then
Excel Lesson 1

make changes in the Formula Bar. You can also
double-click a formula and then edit the formula
directly in the cell.

10
1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Excel Lesson 5
Using Functions

Microsoft Office 2010
Introductory

10
2 Pasewark & Pasewark
Objectives

 Identify the parts of a function.
 Enter formulas with functions.
 Use functions to solve mathematical
Excel Lesson 1

problems.
 Use functions to solve statistical problems.
 Use functions to solve financial problems.

10
3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Objectives (continued)

 Use logical functions to make decisions with
worksheet data.
 Use functions to insert times and dates in a
Excel Lesson 1

worksheet.
 Use text functions to format and display cell
contents.

10
4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary

 argument  logical functions
 date and time functions  mathematical functions
 financial functions  statistical functions
Excel Lesson 1

 Formula AutoComplete  text functions
 function  trigonometric functions

10
5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
What Are Functions?

 A function is a shorthand way to write an
equation that performs a calculation.
 A formula with a function has three parts:
Excel Lesson 1

– The equal sign identifies the cell contents as a
formula.
– The function name identifies the operation to be
performed.
– The argument is the value the function uses to
10 perform a calculation.
6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
What Are Functions? (continued)

 Parts of a function
Excel Lesson 1

10
7 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Entering Formulas with Functions

 To enter a formula with a function, you need
to do the following.
– Start the formula with an equal sign.
Excel Lesson 1

– Select or enter the function you want to use.
– Select or enter the arguments.
– Enter the completed formula.
 To open the Insert Function dialog box, click
the Insert Function button on the Formula
Bar.
10
8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Entering Formulas with Functions
(continued)

 Insert Function dialog box
Excel Lesson 1

10
9 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Entering Formulas with Functions
(continued)

 You can also enter a formula with a function
directly in a cell by typing an equal sign, the
function name, and the argument.
Excel Lesson 1

 Formula AutoComplete helps you enter a
formula with a valid function name and
arguments.
– As you begin to type the function name, a list of
function names appears below the active cell.
11
0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions

 Mathematical functions and trigonometric
functions manipulate quantitative data in a
worksheet.
Excel Lesson 1

 Some mathematical operations, such as
addition and subtraction, do not require
functions.
 Mathematical and trigonometric functions are
particularly useful when you need to
determine values such as logarithms,
11 factorials, and sines.
1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions (continued)

 Commonly used mathematical and trigonometric
functions
Excel Lesson 1

11
2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions (continued)

 Statistical functions are used to describe
quantities of data.
 For example, statistical functions can
Excel Lesson 1

determine:
– the average, standard deviation, or variance of a
range of data.
– the number of values in a range, the largest value
in a range, and the smallest value in a range.
11
3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions (continued)

 Commonly used statistical functions
Excel Lesson 1

11
4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions (continued)

 Financial functions are used to analyze
loans and investments.
 Some commonly used financial functions are
Excel Lesson 1

future value, present value, and payment.

11
5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions (continued)

 Commonly used financial functions
Excel Lesson 1

11
6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions (continued)

 Logical functions, such as the IF function,
display text or values if certain conditions exist.
– The first argument sets a condition for comparison,
called a logical test. The second argument determines
Excel Lesson 1

the value if the logical test is true. The third argument
determines the value if the logical test is false.
 For example, the formula
=IF(C4>60,“PASS”,“FAIL”) returns PASS if the
value in cell C4 is greater than 60; otherwise the
11 formula returns FAIL.
7 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions (continued)

 Commonly used logical functions
Excel Lesson 1

11
8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions (continued)

 Date and Time functions can also be used
to insert dates and times in a worksheet.
Excel Lesson 1

11
9 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Types of Functions (continued)

 Text functions are used to format and
display cell contents.
Excel Lesson 1

12
0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary

In this lesson, you learned:
 A function is a shorthand way to write an equation that
performs a calculation. A formula with a function has
Excel Lesson 1

three parts: an equal sign, a function name, and for
most functions one argument, which acts as an
operand.
 The best way to select a function is from the Insert
Function dialog box. The Function Arguments dialog
box provides a description of each argument you
12 enter for the function.
1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 When you type a formula with a function directly in a
worksheet cell, Formula AutoComplete helps you enter
a formula with a valid function name and arguments.
 Functions can be used to perform mathematical,
Excel Lesson 1

statistical, financial, and logical operations. They can
also be used to insert and calculate dates and times and
to format text.

12
2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Excel Lesson 6
Enhancing a Worksheet

Microsoft Office 2010
Introductory

12
3 Pasewark & Pasewark
Objectives

 Sort and filter data in a worksheet.
 Apply conditional formatting to highlight data.
 Hide worksheet columns and rows.
Excel Lesson 1

 Insert a shape, SmartArt graphic, picture,
and screenshot in a worksheet.
 Use a template to create a new workbook.

12
4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Objectives (continued)

 Insert a hyperlink in a worksheet.
 Save a workbook in a different file format.
 Insert, edit, and delete comments in a
Excel Lesson 1

worksheet.
 Use the Research task pane.

12
5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary

 ascending sort  picture
 comment  Research task pane
 conditional formatting  screen clipping
Excel Lesson 1

 descending sort  screenshot
 filter  shape
 filter arrow  SmartArt graphic
 hyperlink  sort
 object  template
12
6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Sorting Data

 Sorting rearranges data in a more
meaningful order.
 In an ascending sort, data with letters is
Excel Lesson 1

arranged in alphabetical order (A to Z),
numbers are arranged from smallest to
largest. The reverse order occurs in a
descending sort.
 You can sort by more than one column of
data.
12
7 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Sorting Data (continued)

 Sort dialog box
Excel Lesson 1

12
8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Filtering Data

 Filtering displays a subset of data that
meets certain criteria. You can filter by value,
by criteria, or by color.
Excel Lesson 1

 On the Data tab of the Ribbon, click the Filter
button. Filter arrows appear in the lower-
right corners of the cells with column labels.
When you click a filter arrow, the AutoFilter
menu for that column appears.
12
9 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Filtering Data (continued)

 AutoFilter menu
Excel Lesson 1

13
0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Applying Conditional Formatting

 Conditional formatting changes the
appearance of cells that meet a specified
condition.
Excel Lesson 1

 The Highlight Cells Rules format cells based
on comparison operators such as greater
than, less than, between, and equal to.
 The Top/Bottom Rules format cells based on
their rank, such as the top 10 items.
13
1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Hiding Columns and Rows

 Hiding a row or column temporarily removes
it from view.
 Hiding rows and columns enables you to use
Excel Lesson 1

the same worksheet to view different data.
 To hide data, select the rows or columns you
want to hide, and then right-click the
selection. On the shortcut menu that
appears, click Hide.
13
2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Adding a Shape to a Worksheet

 Shapes, such as rectangles, circles, and
arrows can help make a worksheet more
informative.
Excel Lesson 1

 To open the Shapes gallery, click the Insert
tab on the Ribbon, and then click the Shapes
button.
 Shapes are inserted in the worksheet as
objects. An object is anything that appears
on the screen that you can select and work
13 with as a whole.
3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Adding a Shape to a Worksheet
(continued)

 Shapes gallery
Excel Lesson 1

13
4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Adding a SmartArt Graphic to a
Worksheet

 SmartArt graphics enhance worksheets by
providing a visual representation of
information and ideas.
Excel Lesson 1

 To insert a SmartArt graphic, click the
SmartArt button in the Illustrations group on
the Insert tab.
 When the SmartArt graphic is selected,
SmartArt Tools appear on the Ribbon.
13
5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Adding a SmartArt Graphic to a
Worksheet (continued)

 Choose a SmartArt Graphic dialog box
Excel Lesson 1

13
6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Adding a Picture to a Worksheet

 A picture is a digital photograph or other
image file.
 You can insert a picture in a worksheet by
Excel Lesson 1

using a picture file, by using the Clip Art task
pane, or from Office.com.
 A picture is inserted in the workbook as an
object. As with shapes, you can move,
resize, or format the picture to fit your needs.
13
7 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Adding a Screenshot or Screen
Clipping to a Worksheet

 A screenshot is a picture of all or part of
something you see on your monitor.
 When you take a screenshot, you can
Excel Lesson 1

include everything visible on your monitor or
a screen clipping, which is the area you
choose to include.

13
8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Adding a Screenshot or Screen
Clipping to a Worksheet (continued)

 Screen clipping inserted in the worksheet
Excel Lesson 1

13
9 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Using a Template

 Templates are predesigned workbook files
that you can use as the basis or model for
new workbooks.
Excel Lesson 1

 The template includes all the parts of a
workbook that will not change, such as text
labels, formulas, and formatting.
 Excel includes a variety of templates, which
you access from the New tab in Backstage
14 view.
0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Using a Template (continued)

 New tab in Backstage view
Excel Lesson 1

14
1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Inserting a Hyperlink

 A hyperlink is a reference that opens a Web
page, a file, a specific location in the current
workbook, a new document, or an e-mail
Excel Lesson 1

address when you click it.
 To create or edit a hyperlink, you use the
Hyperlink button on the Insert tab of the
Ribbon.
 To use the hyperlink, click the cell or object.
14
2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Saving a Workbook in a Different
Format

 Excel workbooks can be saved in different file
formats so that they can be opened in other
programs.
Excel Lesson 1

14
3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Working with Comments

 A comment is a note attached to a cell that
you can use to explain or identify information
contained in the cell.
Excel Lesson 1

 All of the comments tools are located on the
Review tab of the Ribbon.
 To edit a comment, click the cell that
contains the comment. Then click the Edit
Comment button on the Review tab.
14
4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Using the Research Task Pane

 The Research task pane provides access to
information typically found in references such as
dictionaries and encyclopedias.
Excel Lesson 1

 In Excel, the Research task pane also provides
numerical data typically used in a worksheet,
such as statistics or corporate financial data.
 To open the Research task pane, click the
Review tab on the Ribbon, and then, in the
14 Proofing group, click the Research button.
5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary

In this lesson, you learned:
 Sorting rearranges worksheet data in ascending or
descending alphabetical, numerical, or chronological
order. Filtering displays a subset of data in a
Excel Lesson 1

worksheet that meets specific criteria.
 Conditional formatting formats worksheet data by
changing the appearance of cells that meet a
specified condition, such as a comparison or rank.

14
6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 Hiding rows and/or columns lets you use the same
worksheet to view different data. You can unhide the
hidden rows and columns at any time.
 Shapes, such as rectangles, circles, arrows, lines,
Excel Lesson 1

flowchart symbols, and callouts, can help make a
worksheet more informative. Excel has a gallery of
shapes you can insert.

14
7 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 SmartArt graphics enhance worksheets by providing
visual representations of information and ideas. Excel
has a variety of SmartArt graphics you can use and
customize.
Excel Lesson 1

14
8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Excel Lesson 7
Working with Multiple Worksheets
and Workbooks

Microsoft Office 2010
Introductory

14
9 Pasewark & Pasewark
Objectives

 Move between worksheets in a workbook.
 Rename worksheets and change the sheet
tab color.
Excel Lesson 1

 Reposition, hide and unhide, and insert and
delete worksheets.
 Create cell references to other worksheets.
 Create 3-D references.
15
0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Objectives (continued)

 Print all or part of a workbook.
 Arrange multiple workbooks in the program
window.
Excel Lesson 1

 Move and copy worksheets between
workbooks.

15
1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary

 3-D reference
 destination
 source
Excel Lesson 1

 worksheet range

15
2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Moving Between Worksheets

 A workbook is a collection of worksheets.
Each worksheet is identified with a sheet tab
at the bottom of the workbook window.
Excel Lesson 1

 To view a specific worksheet, simply click its
sheet tab.

15
3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Moving Between Worksheets
(continued)

 Default sheet tabs in a workbook
Excel Lesson 1

15
4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Identifying Worksheets

 To better identify worksheets, give them
descriptive names or change the sheet tab
color.
Excel Lesson 1

 To change the worksheet name, double-click
its sheet tab, and type a new name.
 To change the sheet tab color, right-click the
sheet tab, point to Tab Color on the shortcut
menu, and then click the color you want.
15
5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Managing Worksheets Within a
Workbook

 You can reposition a worksheet by dragging
its sheet tab to a new location.
 You can keep the sheet tabs organized by
Excel Lesson 1

hiding the worksheets you do not need to
view.
 By default, each workbook contains three
worksheets. You can always add or delete
worksheets as needed to accommodate your
data.
15
6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Managing Worksheets Within a
Workbook (continued)

 Sheet tab being repositioned
Excel Lesson 1

15
7 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Consolidating Workbook Data

 Rather than retyping data on multiple
worksheets, you can create a reference to
existing data and formulas in other places.
Excel Lesson 1

 The location of the data being referenced is
the source.
 The location where the data will be used is
the destination.

15
8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Consolidating Workbook Data
(continued)

 A 3-D reference is a reference to the same
cell or range in multiple worksheets that you
use in a formula.
Excel Lesson 1

 A 3-D reference includes the worksheet
range, an exclamation point, and a cell or
range.
 A worksheet range is a group of adjacent
worksheets.
15
9 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Consolidating Workbook Data
(continued)

 Formula with a 3-D reference
Excel Lesson 1

16
0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Printing a Workbook

 So far, you have printed an active worksheet
or selected areas of an active worksheet.
 You can also print an entire workbook,
Excel Lesson 1

selected worksheets, or selected areas of a
workbook.
 To print nonadjacent selections in a
worksheet, hold down the Ctrl key between
selections.
16
1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Printing a Workbook (continued)

 Print options
Excel Lesson 1

16
2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Working with Multiple Workbooks

 You can copy or move workbooks.
 To arrange open workbooks, click the
Arrange All button on the View tab to open
Excel Lesson 1

the Arrange Windows dialog box.

Arrange Windows dialog box
16
3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary

In this lesson, you learned:
 Sheet tabs identify the names of worksheets. You
click a sheet tab to make a worksheet the active
sheet.
Excel Lesson 1

 You can rename worksheets with more descriptive
names to better identify them. You can also change
the color of the sheet tabs.

16
4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 Data is often best organized in multiple worksheets. You
can drag a sheet tab to a new position to organize the
worksheets in a more logical order. You can hide
worksheets from view and then unhide them when
Excel Lesson 1

needed. You can also insert and delete worksheets to
accommodate the data.
 Rather than retyping data, you can create references to
cells or ranges in another worksheet. You can also
create formulas with 3-D references to the same cell or
16 range in multiple worksheets.
5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 You can print entire workbooks, active worksheets, or
selections in one or more worksheets.
 Arranging multiple workbooks in the workbook window
lets you view their contents at the same time.
Excel Lesson 1

Worksheets can be moved or copied from one
workbook to the location you specify in the same or
another workbook.

16
6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Excel Lesson 8
Working with Charts

Microsoft Office 2010
Introductory

16
7 Pasewark & Pasewark
Objectives

 Identify the types of charts you can create in
Excel.
 Create an embedded chart in a worksheet
Excel Lesson 1

and move a chart to a chart sheet.
 Update a data source.
 Choose a chart layout and style.
 Create a 3-D chart.
16
8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Objectives (continued)

 Display and hide chart elements.
 Format and modify a chart.
 Create sparklines.
Excel Lesson 1

16
9 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary

 axis  data label
 chart  data marker
 chart area  data series
Excel Lesson 1

 chart layout  data source
 chart sheet  data table
 chart style  embedded chart
 column chart  exploded pie chart

17
0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Vocabulary (continued)

 legend
 line chart
 pie chart
Excel Lesson 1

 plot area
 scatter chart
 sparkline

17
1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Comparing Chart Types

 A chart is a graphical representation of data.
 The four most commonly used charts are a
column chart, a line chart, a pie chart, and a
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scatter chart.
 These charts as well as several other types
of charts are available in the Charts group on
the Insert tab on the Ribbon.

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2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Comparing Chart Types (continued)

 A column chart uses bars of varying heights
to illustrate data in a worksheet. It is useful
for showing relationships among categories
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of data.

Column chart
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3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Comparing Chart Types (continued)

 A line chart uses points connected by a line to
show data, and is ideal for illustrating trends
over time.
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Line chart
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4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Comparing Chart Types (continued)

 A pie chart shows the relationship of parts to
a whole. Each part is shown as a “slice” of the
pie.
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Pie chart
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5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Comparing Chart Types (continued)

 A scatter chart, sometimes called an XY chart,
shows the relationship between two categories of
data, such as a person’s height and weight.
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17 Scatter chart

6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Creating a Chart

 The process for creating a chart is similar no
matter which chart type you want to create.
– First, you select the data you want to use for the
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chart.
– Second, you select a chart type.
– Finally, you select the chart location.

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7 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Creating a Chart (continued)

 Selecting the data to chart is the first step.
 The chart data, called the data source, is
stored in a range of cells in the worksheet.
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 You can also choose whether to chart more
than one series of data.
 A data series is a group of related information
in a column or row of a worksheet that is
plotted on the chart.
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8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Creating a Chart (continued)

 Selecting the chart type is the second step.
 The next step is to select the type of chart you
want to create, such as a column, pie, or line
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chart.
 Each chart type has a variety of subtypes you
can choose from.
 The chart types are available on the Insert tab
in the Charts group.
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9 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Creating a Chart (continued)

 Insert chart dialog box
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0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Creating a Chart (continued)

 Choosing the chart location is the third step.
 After you select a chart type and subtype, the
chart is inserted in the center of the
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worksheet.
 This is called an embedded chart. You can
move an embedded chart to a chart sheet,
which is a separate sheet in a workbook that
stores a chart.
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1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Updating a Data Source

 Charts are based on the data stored in a
worksheet.
 If you need to change the data in the
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worksheet, the chart is automatically updated
to reflect the new data.
 You switch between a chart sheet and a
worksheet by clicking the appropriate sheet
tabs.
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2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Designing a Chart

 Most charts include some basic elements,
such as a title and legend, which you can
choose to include or hide.
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 Charts are made up of different parts, or
elements. The chart on the next slide
identifies some common chart elements.

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3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Designing a Chart (continued)

 Chart elements
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4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Designing a Chart (continued)

 A chart layout specifies which elements are
included in a chart and where they are
placed.
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 A chart style formats the chart based on the
colors, fonts, and effects associated with the
workbook’s theme.
 You can modify a chart’s appearance by
displaying or rearranging the chart title, axis
titles, legend, data labels, data table, axes,
18 gridlines, and the plot area.
5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Creating a 3-D Chart

 In a pie chart, the slices are different colors
to distinguish each data marker. Pie charts
can be 2-D or 3-D.
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 To create a 3-D chart, choose one of the 3-D
chart styles, such as “Pie in 3-D.”

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6 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Formatting and Modifying a Chart

 The Chart Tools provide a simple way to
create professional-looking charts.
 To make changes to an element’s fill, border
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color, and border style, and so forth, you
need to open its Format dialog box.
 Select the chart element. Then, on the
Format tab, click the Format Selection button
to open the Format dialog box.
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7 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Formatting and Modifying a Chart
(continued)

 Format Axis dialog box
for the horizontal (value)
axis
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8 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Formatting and Modifying a Chart
(continued)

 You use the standard text formatting tools to
make changes to the fonts used in the chart.
 You can change the chart type or subtype.
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Select the chart, and then on the Design tab,
click the Change Chart Type button.

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9 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Inserting Sparklines

 Sparklines are mini charts that you can
insert into a cell.
– A line sparkline is a line chart that appears within
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one cell.
– A column sparkline is a column chart that appears
within one cell.
– A win/loss sparkline inserts a win/loss chart,
which tracks gains and losses, within one cell.
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0 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Inserting Sparklines (continued)

 Examples of line, column, and win/loss sparklines
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1 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Inserting Sparklines (continued)

 To create a sparkline, first select the range
where you want to insert the sparkline.
 In the Sparklines group on the Insert tab,
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click the button corresponding to the type of
sparkline you want to create.

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2 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary

In this lesson, you learned:
 A chart is a graphical representation of data. You can
create several types of worksheet charts, including
column, line, pie, and scatter charts.
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 Charts can be embedded within a worksheet or
created on a chart sheet.
 The process for creating a chart is the same for all
chart types. Select the data for the chart. Select a
chart type. Move, resize, and format the chart as
19 needed.
3 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 Charts are made up of different parts, or elements. You
can apply a chart layout and a chart style to determine
which elements appear in the chart, where they appear,
and how they look.
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 If the data in a chart’s data source is changed in the
worksheet, the chart is automatically updated to reflect
the new data.

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4 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory
Summary (continued)

 You can fine-tune a chart by clicking a chart element
and then opening its Format dialog box. You can also
edit and format the chart text, using the standard text
formatting tools.
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 You can change the type of chart in the Change Chart
Type dialog box.
 Sparklines are mini charts you can insert into a
worksheet cell to show a pattern or trend. The three
types of sparklines are line, column, and win/loss.
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5 Pasewark & Pasewark Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory