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Sweet Water

Annual Meeting
October 17, 2017
Agenda

1) Introduction - Linda Reid
2) Toxic PAH - Chris Magruder & Neil Palmer
3) Codes and Ordinances to Advance Green Infrastructure - Kate Morgan
4) Bayside Flow Modeling and Public Education - Samantha Katt
5) AWS and Corporate Responsibility - Matt Howard & Joan Guiliani
6) Watershed Planning - Will Kort & Kelly Moore Brands
7) Story Mapper - Michael Timm
8) Mid Moraine Water Quality Collaborative - Maureen McBroom & Matt Bednarski
9) Sweet Water Mini-Grants - Joan Herriges & Lindsay Frost
10) Respect Our Waters (ROW) - Jake Fincher & Taylor Baseheart
11) Your Support: Membership, Sponsorship and ROW - Dave Libert
12) Looking Ahead - Linda Reid
Introduction
Linda Reid, SWWT Executive Director
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
(PAH) and Coal Tar Sealants
Chris Magruder, SWWT Consultant
Neil Palmer, Village of Elm Grove & SWWT Board Chair
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants

Where to PAHs come from?

• Naturally occur in oil, coal, tar.

• Manmade = engine exhaust, coal fired power plant
emissions, creosote, coal tar sealants, etc.

• Form during incomplete combustion of carbon-based
materials or fossil fuels (petroleum, coal, wood, diesel,
gasoline, etc.).

• There are two distinct categories of PAHs.

Petrogenic
Pyrogenic

http://saferenvironment.wordpress.com/
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants

What are some of the urban sources of PAHs?

All concentrations in mg/kg, sums of 12 PAHs
(means of as many as 6 studies) Pavement Sealcoats
Fresh asphalt 1.5 Asphalt-based ~ 50
Weathered asphalt 3
Coal-tar-based ~ 70,000
Fresh motor oil 4
Brake particles 16
Road/tunnel dust 24
Tire particles 86
Diesel engine 102
Gasoline engine 370
Used motor oil 440
from B. Mahler SETAC presentation 2014
P. Van Metre
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants

Why SWWT Cares About PAHs

 Many PAHs are toxic, carcinogenic, or mutagenic to aquatic life and humans.

 These environmental effects can be additive.

 Prenatal exposure to PAHs linked to later developmental problems.

 17 PAHs have been identified as being of greatest concern with regard to
potential exposure and adverse health effects on humans (Agency for Toxic
Substances and Disease Registry).

 16 PAHs are on USEPA’s priority pollutant list.

 Costly to remediate.
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants

Exposure to Coal-tar based sealants pose risk of developing cancer

The excess cancer risk for people
living adjacent to coal-tar
sealcoated pavement (1.1 cancer
incidences for every 10,000
individuals exposed) was 38 times
higher, on average (central
tendency), than for people living
adjacent to unsealed pavement.
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants

Milwaukee Findings
Toxicity to aquatic organisms
• PAH concentrations exceed Sediment
Quality Guidelines at many sites
• Sites exceeding Threshold Effect Concentration: 37/40
• Sites exceeding Probable Effect Concentration: 13/37
• 78% of sediment samples likely to cause adverse effects
 Bioassays demonstrate increasing PAH
concentrations were associated with
decreasing Hyalella survival in 75%
of sediment samples
Source apportionment
• 8 methods indicate that “coal tar-based sealcoat is the primary
source” of PAHs to Milwaukee streams.
• EPA CMB Model: On average 77% of PAHs are from coal tar sealcoat dust.
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants
SWWT Spearheads
Development of Alternatives for Management of Coal-tar Sealants

Outright Ban

Public Restricted Use

Government Agency Bans

Hierarchy of Institutional Use Bans

Alternatives Voluntary Supplier/Contractor
Agreements

Voluntary Market Place Controls

Public Education / Awareness
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants
Why did SWWT undertake this project? (taking action on coal-tar sealants)

• Excessive PAHs in coal-tar sealants are known to be detrimental to the
environment and human health.

• Most studies find coal-tar sealants are a primary source of PAHs in areas where
used, including the MILWAUKEE REGION!

• Arguments for policy action can be made on multiple grounds:
 Human health
 Environmental health
 Economics

• Coal-tar sealants are a CONTROLLABLE source with REASONABLE alternatives
available.
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants
Accomplishments
Science Advisory Committee - White Paper Development

Merge key elements of preliminary White Paper with the White Paper provided to Sweetwater Policy
finding of published Professional Paper. Advisory Committee for policy discussions.
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants

Collaboration with CleanWisconsin

 Tar-Based Pavement Sealants and
Toxic PAH Pollution - Fact Sheet.

 Continuing PAH and Coal-tar Sealants
Research.

 Continuing Educational Public
Outreach Campaign.
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants
Who Have We Met With?
 Midwest Water Analysis Conference

 Sweet Water Clean Rivers, Clean Lake Conference

 American Water Resources Association Conference – Wisconsin Chapter

 Lake Michigan Stakeholder - Lake Michigan Day

 Wisconsin Groundwater Association

 Fox River Summit
Intergovernmental Cooperation Executive Council
 MMSD Technical Advisory Team MMSD Executive Director

 WDNR AOC–RAP Coordinator and Committee WDNR S.E. District Stormwater Manager

 City of Milwaukee Sustainability Manager UWM Environmental Committee

 Sweet Water Science Advisory Committee Sweet Water Policy Advisory Committee

 Medical College of Wisconsin Children's Hospital

 Northwestern Mutual City Glendale

 City of Shorewood Village of Elm Grove

 Village of Fox Point
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants

Accomplishments
Intergovernmental Cooperation Council (ICC’s) Executive Council

Adopted Resolution
(December 12, 2016)

“It is resolved that the ICC acknowledges that coal-tar is a
significant source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)
loading to Milwaukee-area streambed sediments – posing great
risk to both human and aquatic life – and appointed officials
will work within their statutory authority to support
restrictions of application, or outright banning, of coal-tar
products within their respective municipalities.”
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants

Accomplishments
Community Action

Communities pass ordinances to limit or
ban the use of coal-tar and high PAH
pavement sealants:

 Milwaukee
 Glendale
 Elm Grove
 Shorewood
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons And Coal Tar Sealants

A Regional or Statewide Coal-Tar and High PAH Sealants ban would
do the following:

1. Protect human health.
• By reducing exposure to potential carcinogens

2. Protect aquatic ecosystems from harm.
• By reducing lethal and sublethal effects

3. Reduce municipal costs for hazardous/contaminated sediment disposal.
Codes and Ordinances to
Advance Green Infrastructure
Kate Morgan, Metropolitan Milwaukee Sewerage District
Bayside Flow Modeling and
Public Education
Samantha Katt, SWWT Intern
Alliance for Water Stewardship
and Corporate Responsibility
Matt Howard, AWS and SWWT Board Member
Joan Guiliani, MillerCoors
Joan Giuliani
SUSTAINABILITY AT MILLERCOORS DEFINED:

MAKE A POSITIVE AND MEANINGFUL IMPACT
ON THE SOCIAL, ENVIRONMENTAL AND
ECONOMIC ISSUES THAT AFFECT OUR BUSINESS,
EMPLOYEES AND OTHER STAKEHOLDERS
Watershed Planning
Will Kort, UW-Milwaukee & SWWT Consultant
Kelly Moore Brands, 16th St. Community Health Center
50
Kinnickinnic River Flood
Management Project

Future
Story
Mapper
Michael Timm, Reflo, Inc.
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Milwaukee Story Mapper
Mid Moraine
Water Quality Collective
Maureen McBroom, Ruekert & Mielke, Inc.
Matt Bednarski, GRAEF
Respect Our Waters
Jake Fincher, SWWT Staff
Taylor Baseheart, SWWT Staff
Sweet Water Mini Grant
Joan Herriges, SWWT Staff
Lindsay Frost, Harbor District
“Habitat Hotels” Mini Grant Project
Lindsay Frost
NATURAL SHORELINE
Our Design Habitat Hotels fit within
corrugations of steel sheet
piling bulkheads.

Water lilies, sago
pondweed, water
celery, and pickerel
weed.

Underwater planter
baskets hold native aquatic Vertically layered habitat
plants. “features”
are modular.

Fish shelves

Thanks Geoff
and Dylan!
THANK YOU!

Eddee Daniel
Your Support:
Membership, Sponsorship, ROW
Dave Libert, SWWT Staff
------------------------------------SUSTAINERS-------------------------------------

------------------------------------PROMOTERS-------------------------------------

YOU!

------------------------------------SUPPORTERS-------------------------------------
Looking Ahead
Linda Reid, SWWT Executive Director