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LAND RESOURCES Land utilisation pattern

Non-viable pattern of land’s utilisation in agriculture

Land is the most important of all natural resources

Essential for human existence Required for agriculture & factories Land endowments vary across the country

India ranks 7 th in the world in terms of area & 2 nd in terms of population

Total area of 32.9 crore hectares or 329 million hectares

REPORTING AREA Not 100% of geographical area

Some areas not easily accessible & their economic utility is presumed to be limited

BARREN LAND (14 % of Reporting area)

Mountains , deserts etc which cannot be brought under cultivation

Area under non-agricultural uses land occupied by buildings, roads, railways, rivers, canals & other lands put to uses other than agriculture

In 1950-51, area under non-agricultural uses was ten(10) million hectares (MH) & increased to 26 MH

Cultivable waste land reduced from 23 MH in 1950- 51 to 13 MH in 2011-12

BARREN LAND would increase with an increase in population & unbanisation

AREA UNDER FORESTS (23 %)

All land classified as forests by law or administered as forests (state owned or private)

& whether wooded or maintained as potential forest land

National Forest Policy Resolution of 1952 recommended coverage of one third of total area to maintain ecological balance

Yet to achieve this national objective

PASTURES & GRAZING LAND (3%)

CUTIVABLE WASTE LANDS etc (4%)

Lands available but not cultivated during the previous 5 or more years

maybe be fallow or covered with scrubs & jungles

FALLOW LANDS (9%)

Land that remains uncultivated during a given year or for some period

Current fallows (current year) or other fallows (1 5 years uncultivated) due to poverty, unremunerative, water shortage etc

AGRICULTURAL LAND Net area sown is 140 MH or 46% of reporting area Total cropped area 192 MH in 2009 -10 (by 2020 estimated land required would be 500MH if the present

pattern continues) Non-Viable Pattern of Land Utilisation No planning in land utilisation Land relations have been retrogressive

More area brought under cultivation by (a) clearing forests (b) converting grazing lands

(c) bringing cultivable wastelands under farming

(d)Shifting cropping pattern (diverting land under fodder crops to food crops)

REMEDIES Intensive cultivation multiple cropping increase productivity levels Extending irrigation & rationalize water usage Thus increasing gross cropped area by increasing area sown more than once Develop an integrated land use plan

References:

Indian Economy: S.K. Mishra & V.K. Puri Datt & Sundharam’s Indian Economy: Datt & Mahajan