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DENTAL ANATOMY

Ari Cahyono,
Department of General Dental Practice And
Oral & Maxillofacial Radiology
Faculty of dentistry
University of Jember
Dental Anatomy
1. Anatomy of a tooth.
a. Anatomical crown- portion of tooth
covered with enamel
Anatomic crown
Dental Anatomy

b. Clinical crown- visible part of tooth


above the gum line.

Clinical Anatomical
crown crown
Dental Anatomy

c. Root
(1) Part of tooth embedded in the
alveolar process and covered by
cementum.
Dental Anatomy

d. Apex- tapered end of


root tip.

e. Apical foramen-
opening at
the root tip.
Dental Anatomy
2. Tissues of the tooth.
a. Enamel
(1) Makes up anatomic crown.
(2) Hardest material in the human
body.
(3) Incapable of remodeling and
repair.
Enamel
Dental Anatomy

b. Dentin
(1) Makes up bulk of tooth.
(2) Covered by enamel on crown
and cementum on the root.
(3) Not as hard as enamel.
(4) Exposed dentin is often
sensitive to cold, hot, air, and
touch (via dentinal tubules).
Enamel
Dentin
Dentinal
Tubules
Dental Anatomy
c. Cementum
(1) Covers root of tooth.
(2) Overlies the dentin and joins
the enamel at the cemento-enamel
junction (CEJ).
(3) Primary function is to anchor
the tooth to the bony socket
with attachment fibers.
Enamel
Dentin
Dentinal
Tubules
Cementum
Dental Anatomy

d. Pulp
(1) Made up of blood vessels
and nerves entering through
the apical foramen.
(2) Contains connective tissue,
which aids interchange
between pulp and dentin.
Enamel
Dentin
Dentinal
Tubules
Cementum
Pulp
Enamel
Dentin
Dentinal
Tubules
Cementum
Pulp
Alveolar
Process
Cortical Plate
Spongy Bone
Types of Dentition

1. Deciduous (baby) teeth


a. Twenty ( 20) primary teeth.
b. Arches - maxillary and mandibular.
c. Quadrants - each arch divided in
half.
(1) Maxillary right and left.
(2) Mandibular right and left.
Deciduous Teeth
d. Teeth in each quadrant.
(1) Central incisor
(2) Lateral incisor
(3) Cuspid
(4) 1st molar
(5) 2nd molar
Deciduous Teeth

e. Anterior and posterior teeth.


(1) Anterior - centrals, laterals,
and cuspids.
(2) Posterior - molars.
Types of Dentition

2. Permanent teeth.
a. Thirty-two (32) permanent
teeth.
R L
b. Arches - maxillary
& mandibular.
Tooth Surfaces

1. Facial - next to cheeks & lips .


a. Labial- anterior facial.
b. Buccal - posterior facial.
2. Lingual- next to tongue.
3. Mesial - towards midline, an imaginary line
between central incisors.
Tooth Surfaces

4. Distal- away from midline.


5. Incisal- cutting edge of anterior teeth.
6. Occlusal- chewing surface of the posterior
teeth.
Tooth Surfaces
7. Proximal surfaces - mesial
or distal surface of a tooth
lying next to another tooth.
8. Interproximal space
(embrasure) - spaces between
teeth, filled with hard and
soft tissue (interdental papilla).
Lecture Overview
Primary Dentition
General Morphological considerations
Implications of Primary tooth morphology
Primary Dentition

20 primary teeth as compared to 32


permanent teeth
No premolars in the primary dentition
The primary molars are replaced by the
premolars
The permanent molars erupt distal to the
primary second molars
General Morphologic
considerations

Crown
Pulp
Root
Crown of Primary Teeth

Shorter
Narrower occlusal table
Constricted in the cervical portion
Thinner enamel and dentin layers
Enamel rods in the cervical area
directed occlusally
Broad and flat contacts
Color is usually lighter
Crown of Primary Teeth

Prominent mesio-buccal
cervical bulge seen in primary
molars
Incisors have no developmental
grooves or mammelons
Primary Crown Anatomy

Mandibular Incisors- central is symmetrically flat


when viewed from buccal, lateral has a more
rounded DI angle
Maxillary Incisors- central is only tooth that has
a greater width than height
Maxillary 1st Molar- unique look, 3 cusps
Mandibular 1st Molar- 4 cusps, transverse ridge
dividing occlusal surface
Primary Crown Anatomy

Canines- maxillary is long and sharp,


mandibular has similar shape but smaller
Maxillary 2nd Molar - resembles
permanent maxillary first molar but smaller
Mandibular 2nd Molar- resembles
permanent mandibular first molar but smaller
Pulps of Primary Teeth

Relatively larger
Pulp horns are closer to the outer surface
Great variation in size and location
Mesial pulp horn is higher
Pulp chamber shallow
Form of the pulp follows the external
anatomy
Usually a pulp horn under each cusp
Roots of Primary Teeth

Roots of anterior teeth


are narrower mesiodistally
Posterior teeth have
longer and more slender
roots in relation to crown size
Molar roots flare more as
they approach the apex
Apical foramina may be larger
and accessory canals often
larger and more numerous
Summary
Primary teeth have :
- Thinner enamel and dentin layers
- Pulp horns closer to the outer surface
- Mesial pulp horn much higher
- Relatively larger pulps
- Enamel rods direct slightly occlusally in the cervical
area
- Cervical area is constricted significantly
- Roots flare as they approach the apex
- More tortuous and irregular pulp canals
Any Questions
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