Chapter 12 Self-Concept and Lifestyle

Irwin/McGraw-Hill

Actual versus Ideal self-concept  Private versus Social self-concept   The Extended Self is comprised of one’s self and one’s possessions. Thus.Self-Concept  Self-Concept is one’s perceptions of and feelings about him/herself. Irwin/McGraw-Hill . our self-concept is defined in part by what we possess.

and Product Concepts. 14. 2. 13. Rugged Excitable Uncomfortable Dominating Thrifty Pleasant Contemporary Organized Rational Youthful Formal Orthodox Complex Colorless Modest ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Delicate Calm Comfortable Submissive Indulgent Unpleasant Noncontemporary Unorganized Emotional Mature Informal Liberal Simple Colorful Vain Irwin/McGraw-Hill Source: N. p. 9. 10. 6. Malhotra.Measurement Scales for Self-Concepts. 5. Person-Concepts. Person Concepts. Measurement Scales for Self-Concepts. and Product Concepts 1. 7. 8. “A Scale to Measure Self-Concepts. 3. .” Journal of Marketing Research. 15.462. 11. November 1981. 4. 12. K. and Product Concepts Person Concepts.

The Relationship between Self-Concept The Relationship between Self-Concept and Brand Image Influence and Brand Image Influence Product Brand Image Relationship Between selfconcept and brand image Behavior Seek products and brands that improve/maintain self-concept Satisfaction Purchase contributes to desired self-concept Consumer Selfconcept Reinforces self-concept © The McGraw-Hill Companies. Irwin/McGraw-Hill .

 Psychographics is the measurement of lifestyles.  Original measure was AIO inventory  Today’s measures include wider variety of customer characteristics  Most psychographic measures are data driven.Lifestyle and Psychographics Lifestyles describe the way we live.  Irwin/McGraw-Hill .  Many psychographic measures are product or consumption-situation specific.

.Lifestyle and the Consumption Process Lifestyle determinants           Lifestyle How we live        Impact on behavior Purchases      Demographics Subculture Social class Motives Personality Emotions Values Household life cycle Culture Past experiences Activities Interests Like/dislikes Attitudes Consumption Expectations Feelings How When Where What With whom Consumption      Where With whom How When What Irwin/McGraw-Hill © The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Conscience-stricken: no time for self-realization. . less about appearance. Unconcerned: neutral attitudes to health and appearance. Irwin/McGraw-Hill Source: T.17-24. February 1988. 2. cool on exercise. 5. 3. Dowdies: indifferent to fashion. Self-aware: concerned about appearance. and dress for comfort. busy with family responsibilities. Fashion-direct: concerned about fashion and appearance. 6. fashion. not about exercise and sport. 4. Bowles. and exercise. pp. Green goddesses: concerned about sport and fitness.Lifestyle Analysis of the British Cosmetics Market Cosmetic Lifestyle Segments 1. “Does Classifying People by Lifestyle Really Help the Advertiser?” European Research.

Lifestyle Analysis of the British Cosmetics Market Behaviors and Descriptors Retail Outlets* Cosmetic Blush Use Use Miss Age† Social Index Index Wallis Selfridge Etam C&A (15-44) Class ‡ Self-aware Fashion-directed Green goddesses Unconcerned Conscience-stricken Dowdies 162 147 95 82 68 37 188 166 76 81 59 19 228 153 74 70 53 17 189 165 86 89 40 22 151 118 119 74 82 52 102 112 103 95 99 85 51% 43 32 44 24 20 60% 56 52 64 59 62 *100 = Average usage. February 1988. Irwin/McGraw-Hill . “Does Classifying People by Lifestyle Really Help the Advertiser?” European Research.” ‡ Read as “_________ percent of this group is in the working and lower middle class.” Source: T. Bowles.17-24. † Read as “_________ percent of this group is between 15 and 44. pp.

VALS VALS is a system developed by SRI International to classify individuals into groups based on psychographic measures.  VALS identifies three primary self-orientations:  principle oriented  status oriented  action oriented   Resources is the second dimension in VALS and measures the ability of individual to pursue their dominant self-orientation. Irwin/McGraw-Hill .

.VALS2 Lifestyle System Actualizer Principle Fulfilled Status Action Abundant resources Achiever Experiencer Believer Striver Maker Struggler Minimal resources Irwin/McGraw-Hill Source: SRI International.

VALS2 Segment Activities 2nd Media Use* VALS2 Segment Activities 2nd Media Use* Actualizer Struggler 50 80 47 116 68 50 12 32 34 14 39 58 * Figures under each segment are the index for each segment (100 = Base rate usage). . Experiencer 109 54 133 55 115 157 216 89 172 154 143 88 Segment Achiever Believer Fulfilled Striver Barbecue outdoors Do gardening Do gourmet cooking Drink coffee daily Drink herbal tea Drink domestic beer Drink imported beer Do activities with kids Play team sports Do cultural activities Exercise Do home repairs Irwin/McGraw-Hill 125 155 217 120 171 141 238 155 114 293 145 161 93 129 117 119 125 88 93 129 73 63 114 113 82 118 96 126 89 73 41 57 69 67 69 85 118 109 103 88 117 101 130 141 104 96 123 82 111 68 53 87 71 87 58 112 110 45 94 53 Maker 123 104 86 91 81 123 88 116 135 63 102 171 Source: SRI International.

Law” Watch “McGyver” Irwin/McGraw-Hill 190 109 92 255 274 58 56 83 533 161 96 35 48 64 105 227 173 143 83 115 120 199 113 50 36 73 50 74 106 150 119 113 29 161 132 126 52 90 79 179 87 90 46 129 77 62 114 57 59 96 50 37 66 63 37 93 44 42 109 92 Maker 171 94 157 33 49 87 209 86 45 37 89 153 Source: SRI International.A. Experiencer 283 231 254 71 109 57 130 135 105 35 71 104 Segment Achiever Believer Fulfilled Striver Do risky sports Socialize weekly Automotive magazines Business magazines Commentary magazines Reader’s Digest Fish and game magazines Human-interest magazines Literary magazines Watch “Face the Nation” Watch “L.VALS2 Segment Activities 2nd Media Use* VALS2 Segment Activities 2nd Media Use* Actualizer Struggler 7 62 22 8 15 130 79 46 31 126 70 140 * Figures under each segment are the index for each segment (100 = Base rate usage). .

Irwin/McGraw-Hill . Comprised of older people who are content with their lives and who manage to maintain their values while faced with change Are “rooted to the past” and cling to the country’s heritage and cultural values. the affluent. on-the-go lives. Older than strivers. Driven to achieve success. assertive Achievers are upwardly mobile and already have attained a good measure of success. they are materialistic pleasure seekers for whom time and money are in short supply. They are status conscious consumers for whom quality is important.BSBW’s Global Psychographic Segments  Strivers (26%)   Achievers (22%)   Pressured (13%)   Adapters (18%)   Traditionals (16%)  Consists of young people with a median age of 31 who live hectic. cuts across age groups and is characterized by constant financial and family pressures. Comprised mostly of women.

.GLOBAL SCAN GLOBAL SCAN Segment Sizes across Countries Segment Sizes across Countries Unassigned Adapters Traditionals Pressured Achievers Strivers 22% 26% 29% 18% 2% 22% 14% 12% 14% 19% 22% 17% 18% 12% 8% 17% 16% 12% Japan Irwin/McGraw-Hill United States United Kingdom © The McGraw-Hill Companies.

” He likes trying new things and is open to new ideas. He enjoys excitement. impulsive and rebellious. enthusiastic. savors the offbeat. Tom would most likely be classified as a(n): Actualizer  Achiever  Striver  Experiencer  Maker  Irwin/McGraw-Hill . and is a “risk taker. Tom sees himself as young.

She takes great pride in her family and in her home. She has collected items for her home for many years and believes that the atmosphere of her home help make her who she is. Martha sees herself as a happy homemaker and generally a pleasant and happy person to be around. This illustrates: Actual self-concept  Ideal self-concept  Private self-concept  Social self-concept  Extended self  Irwin/McGraw-Hill .

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