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To develop personnel become more responsive

and proactive in dealing with fire safety...


They should understand the following:
 The elements of fire
 The classes of fire
 Different strategies of preventing fire
 Ways to extinguish a fire
 How to inspect Fire Extinguishers
 What should be included in the Emergency
Action Plan
 What to do in case of fire
 FUEL
This can be any combustible material – solid, liquid or gas.

 OXYGEN
Fire needs only 16 % oxygen to ignite, while we need at
least19.5% to breath.

 HEAT
This is a form of energy needed for the fuel to generate
sufficient vapours for ignition to occur.

 CHEMICAL CHAIN REACTION


When fuel, oxygen and heat come together in the right
amounts and under the right conditions, a chemical chain
reaction happens and fire occurs.

TAKE AWAY ANY ONE OF THESE FACTORS, FIRE CAN’T EXIST.


 Class A – Ordinary combustible materials such as
wood, paper, cloth, rubber, plastics, etc.
 Class B – Flammable or combustible gases and liquids
such as gasoline, kerosene, paint, thinners, propane,
methane, etc.

 Class C – Energized electrical equipment such as


appliances, switches or power tools.
 Class D - Certain combustible metals such as
magnesium, titanium, potassium or sodium.
 Class A Fires can be avoided through simple,
routine housekeeping.

◦ Make sure storage and working areas are free of


trash.
◦ Place any oily rags and similar debris in covered
metal containers away from any flame-producing
source.
◦ Empty all trash containers daily.
• Class B Fires can be prevented by taking special
precautions when working with or around
flammable liquids and gases.

– Use flammable liquids only in well-ventilated area


– Keep flammable liquids stores in tightly sealed, self-
closing and spill proof containers
– Store flammable liquids away from spark producing
sources
– Limit portable storage can to maximum of 5 gallons
each
– Never store more than 25 gallons of flammable liquids
inside a building – unless it is an approved storage
container
– Make sure outside storage of flammables is least 20 ft
away from other buildings.
• Class C Fires involving the use and misuse of
electrical equipment are the number one cause of
fire in the workplace.

– Check electrical equipment for old and worn wiring or


broken, damaged fittings. Report any hazardous conditions
to your supervisor.
– Prevent electric motors from overheating by keeping them
clean and in good working order.
– Never install a fuse rated higher than a specified for a circuit
– Never overload wall sockets. One outlet should have no
more than two plugs.
– Don’t plug more than one heat producing appliance into an
outlet. Investigate any appliance or equipment that smells
strange. This is often the first sign of a fire.
– Use utility lights that have some type of wire guard over
them. Direct contact with an uncovered light bulb can ignite
combustible material.
 The best way to prevent a Class-D fire is to
always follow the material handling
guidelines of your organization when
handling combustible metals, such as
magnesium, potassium, titanium and sodium.
Failure to do so can spell disaster.
Each fire extinguisher displays a rating
on the faceplate showing the class of fire it is
designed to put out. Some extinguishers are
marked with multiple ratings such as
AB, BC or ABC.
 Class A extinguishers are effective on
ORDINARY COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS. The
extinguisher cools the temperature of the
burning material below its ignition
temperature. These extinguishers use
pressurized water, foam or multi-purpose dry
chemical agents. Class A extinguishers carry
a numerical rating that indicates how large a
fire you can safely put out with that
extinguisher.
 Class-B extinguishers should be used on
FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS OR GASES. Class B
extinguishers may come in several types
including foam, carbon dioxide, ordinary dry
chemical, multi-purpose dry chemicals,
halons or halon replacements. Class B
extinguishers carry a numerical rating similar
to class A extinguishers that indicates how
large a fire you can safely put out with that
extinguisher.
• Class C extinguishers are to be used
specifically on ELECTRICAL FIRES. Class-C
extinguishers may contain carbon dioxide,
ordinary dry chemical, multi-purpose dry
chemical, halons or halon replacement
agents. Carbon dioxide, halons or halon
replacements which do not leave harmful
residue are preferable for computers and
other sensitive electrical equipment. Never
use water or any extinguishing agent capable
of conducting electricity on Class C fires.
•Class-D extinguishers should only be used
on combustible metals. Class D extinguishers
are made with agents specially designed for
the material involved. In most cases, they
absorb heat and cool the material below its
ignition temperature. Class D fires react
violently to water and other types of
chemicals. Class D extinguishers carry only a
letter rating to indicate their effectiveness on
certain amounts of specific metals.
• Use the PASS method:
– P – Pull the pin
– A – Aim the extinguisher at the base of the fire
– S – Squeeze the trigger while holding the extinguisher
upright
– S – Sweep the extinguisher from side to side, covering
the area of the fire with the extinguishing agent.

ONLY USE FIRE EXTINGUISHER WHEN IT IS SAFE TO DO SO.


IF THE FIRE IS SO BIG, OR IF IT IS SPREADING OR
THREATENING TO BLOCK YOUR PATH OF ESCAPE, LEAVE
THE AREA IMMEDIATELY.
IF NECESSARY, DON’T HESITATE TO USE THE FIRE
EXTINGUISHER TO CLEAR AN ESCAPE PATH.
Six Steps to Properly Check

• 1. Read the gauge, see if pressure still OK.


• 2. Check the tags, last inspection, person
inspected.
• 3. Check the hose for any obstruction.
• 4. Check the mount, see if properly fastened.
• 5. Remove the extinguisher and invert it five times.
• 6. Recheck the gauge, if gauge moved, replace
extinguisher.
• A written up-to-date Emergency Action Plan for your
workplace is essential. It should include detailed
instructions on how to evacuate the building and
specific individuals in charge of evacuation.

– Primary and secondary escape routes should be outlined for


every area of the building
– Maps of escape routes with simple instruction should be
posted
– Emergency Action Leaders should be assigned specific
duties, such as verifying that all workers have evacuated
– Disabled workers or those with a history of certain medical
conditions should be assigned an Emergency Action Leader
to guide them to safety
– Stairways should be kept free of materials that could block
or hinder an evacuation.
– Regular fire drills should be conducted to identify problems
before an actual fire occurs. Treat the drills as if they were
the “real thing.”
• Know and follow the evacuation procedures
• Proceed calmly, but quickly
• Never use an elevator, loss of power can trap you
• Close the door if you’re the last one to leave the
room, but do not lock
• Once in stairwell, proceed down to the first floor
and exit the building
• Keep low to the ground to avoid smoke and toxic
gases
• If possible, cover your nose and mouth with cloth
• Once you are safely out of the building, report to
an assembly area and participate in headcount
• Don’t panic.
• If a telephone is available call for rescue.
• Never open a closed door without feeling the
door first with the back of your hand. If the
door is hot, try other exit.
• If you are having difficulty in breathing,
remain close to the floor and ventilate the
room by opening or even breaking window
• If a co-worker catches on fire, smother the
flames by grabbing a jacket, blanket or rug
and wrap it around him or her.