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CLIMATE

CHANGE ACT
And a little about climate change.
WHAT IS
CLIMATE
CHANGE?
CLIMATE CHANGE
➤ A lot of factors greatly contribute to through natural sources and human
Climate Change, but the increase in
activities, including the decomposition of
temperature is primarily caused by
human activities. wastes in landfills, agriculture, and
Example: especially rice cultivation, as well as
ruminant digestion and manure
Water vapor – most abundant greenhouse
management associated with domestic
gas, acts as a feedback to the climate. It
livestock.
increases as the Earth's atmosphere
warms and so does the possibility of
clouds and precipitation, making it a Nitrous oxide – powerful greenhouse gas
feedback mechanism. produced by soil cultivation practices,
especially the use of commercial and
organic fertilizers, fossil fuel combustion,
Carbon dioxide (CO2) – minor but an
nitric acid production, and biomass
important component of the atmosphere. It
burning.
is released through natural processes such
as respiration and volcano eruptions and
through human activities such as Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Synthetic
deforestation, land use changes, and compounds entirely of industrial origin
burning fossil fuels. CO2 concentration was used in a number of applications. It is used
increased by more than a third when as refrigerants, cleaning solvents, and
Industrial Revolution began. aerosol propellants and in the manufacture
of plastic foams.
Exits the Atmosphere

Heat

Enters the
Atmosphere
WHAT IS THE
IMPORTANCE
OF CLIMATE
CHANGE
ACT?
NOT JUST A LAW
IT IS NOT JUST A
LAW
IT’S ONE OF THE
POLICIES
DESIGNED TO
SAVE A LOT MORE
THAN ‘JUST’
TREES
WHAT IS THE ROLE
OF THE LOCAL
GOVERNMENT IN
IMPLEMENTING
THE CLIMATE
CHANGE ACT?

Governance is Science; Good Governance is Science
and Passion

Words to Think About


HOW ABOUT THE
ESTABLISHMENTS
AROUND THE AREA?
FACTORS AFFECTING NATURE IN THE B

BUSINESSES

CUSTOMERS EMPLOYEES
SAMPLE IDEAS - SAMPLE IDEAS -
TRIPARTITE ROLES
What you can do for your business?
SUZUKI
IN DEDUCTION
1. Get an energy audit.
2. Recycle everything you can.
FOUNDATION
. Get involved
3. Reuse whatever you can. Reduce what you can.
4. Go digital.
5. Get rid of Styrofoam, Thick Plastics, Plastic containers, least-
. Be energy efficient
degradable materials.
6. Eliminate disposables in the break room*
7. Reduce energy use in the restrooms. . Choose renewable power
8. Switch to eco-friendly cleaning products.
9. Adjust your thermostat.
10. Insulate the building(s) . Eat wisely
11. Use natural lighting when possible, and switch to compact
fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs or LEDs
12. Use Green Packaging. . Trim your waste
How to get employees involved:

13. Give recognition to employees who use green practices.


. Let polluters pay
14. Offer incentives for walking, biking, bus riding or carpooling to
work.
15. Put a compost bin in the break room*
. Fly less
16. Encourage employees to turn off and/or unplug appliances
when not in use.
17. Let employees work remotely if possible. . Get informed with Green Options
How to get customers involved in climate change prevention:
. Green your commute
18. Offer digital receipts.
19. Offer incentives for not driving.
20. Reduce use of bags. If necessary, promote the use of reusable
bags by the registers.
. Support, Donate, Help
21. Participate in a carbon offset program.
QUESTION OF EFFICIENCY
LIGHT EFFICIENCY; BY TYPE

FACTORS
Incandescent CFL LED

Life Span 1,000 hours 6,000 50,000 hours

Watts 40W 9W 6W

Lumens 400 320 300

Heat Emitted 56.6 BTUs per hour 20.3 BTUs per hour 2.3 BTUs per hour

CO2 Emissions 3000 pounds per year 701 pounds per year 301 pounds per year

Contains Mercury No Yes No

RoHS Compliant Yes No Yes

Kilowatts of Electricity Used* 2190 KWh per year 531 KWh per year 228 KWh per year

Annual Operating Cost* $219.06 per year $53.06 per year $22.76 per year

Cost of Bulb $0.84 $2.49 (average) $24.99

Vs. Incandescent:
Months to Recover Initial
N/A Vs. Incandescent: <1 month 1.5 months
Expense
“ We all know there is never a wrong time to do or say the right thing, but often it’s not
easy, though. As professionals, we pick many battles; some we win, some we lose. A
battle against the establishment — power suppliers, producers, systems, processes
and procedures — brings mixed blessings. If we don't celebrate these little wins, we will
go down deep in frustration.

Believing in something with conviction does produce results in the long term. Our
battles, small or large, define who we are and what we believe in. And a little win like
this will give me the energy to fight many more battles they are worth the cause.

SOHAIL HASNIE,
Principal Energy Specialist, Central and West Asia Regional Department, ADB
“My battle with incandescent light bulbs (which use about 10% of the electricity they consume to produce light and waste most of the rest on

generating unnecessary heat) in the Philippines started at the 2008 Philippines Energy Summit, where experts met to discuss energy security

ANECDOTES
issues in the country when the price of oil had surpassed $100 a barrel”

OF A HERO
“Replacing 1 million incandescent bulbs with CFLs for about $1 million, I pointed out, would save up

to 50 megawatts (MW) of power, or the equivalent of building a $50 million power station (not

including maintenance, land acquisition, fuel and emissions)”

“The project had many implementation challenges, but last week I felt inside my heart that all the effort was worth it because it

contributed to bringing down the number of incandescent bulbs from 180 million units a year in 2007 to almost zero in just 8 years.

Now, most countries have followed the example of the Philippines, not through complicated laws as we thought would be the only way

back then but because the market simply doesn’t buy inefficient incandescent bulbs anymore”

TIME AND COOPERATION IS OF THE


ESSENCE IN THIS ADVOCACY