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ENGLISH 6

WEEK 2
1 Quarter
st
Day 2
Objectives:

o Analyze sound devices


(personification) in a text heard.
o Read aloud grade level
appropriate text with accuracy
rate of 95-100%.
Listen as your teacher reads a short poem “Dinnertime Chorus” by
Sharon Hendricks. Analyze the mood of the poem and the writer’s
purpose for writing it.

Dinnertime Chorus
by Sharon Hendricks

The teapot sang as the water boiled


The ice cubes cackled in their glass
The teacups chattered to one another
While the chairs were passing gas
The gravy gurgled merrily
As the oil danced in pan
Oh my dinnertime chorus
What a lovely, lovely clan!
What is the poem all about?

What emotion did you feel while listening to the


poem?

Why do you think the poem is entitled “Dinnertime


Chorus?”

What do you think is the writer’s purpose for writing


this poem?
Listen as your teacher rereads the poem “Dinnertime Chorus” by
Sharon Hendricks.

Dinnertime Chorus
by Sharon Hendricks

The teapot sang as the water boiled


The ice cubes cackled in their glass
The teacups chattered to one another
While the chairs were passing gas
The gravy gurgled merrily
As the oil danced in pan
Oh my dinnertime chorus
What a lovely, lovely clan!
What are the inanimate objects personified in the
poem?

What specific activities did each inanimate object


do?

What can you say about their activities?

Are these realistic?

Can these inanimate objects really move and act like


humans?
You should know that in reality, it is impossible for inanimate objects to
move and act like humans.
In the poem you listen to, the writer used personification.

In the previous week, you learned about it already.


Today, we will review personification. Be ready for the tasks ahead.

Personification is the attribution of human qualities, nature or


characteristics to inanimate objects or something nonhuman. It is also
the representation of an abstract quality in human form.

Examples:
“And then one day the boy came back and the tree shook with joy.”
(excerpt from “The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein)

The little dog laughed to see such sport,


And the dish ran away with the spoon.
(nursery rhyme)

The night was creeping on the ground!


She crept and did not make a sound
(excerpt from “Check” by James Stephens)
Listen as your teacher recites the poem “Bicycling” by Alan Loren.
As you listen, jot down all examples of personification from the
poem. Write your answers inside the wheels of the bicycle below.
Listen and jot down.

Bicycling
by Alan Loren

Haven’t you seen, perhaps in a dream?


A bicycle racing next to a stream
Its two tires spinning and hugging the ground
Picking up speed with nary a sound
Its chain sometimes clanks as the tires do churn
The horn announces loudly that soon it would turn
Oh how I love to ride on my bike
But next time I think I’ll just go for a hike!
Answer:
Answer:
Day 3
Objectives:

o Analyze poem with 4 or more


stanzas in terms of its elements
(rhymes, sound devices, imagery
and figurative language)
o Relate an experience appropriate
to the occasion.
o Observe politeness at all times.
o Show tactfulness when
communicating with others.
o Show openness to criticism.
Let’s Try This
Can You Guess the Missing Words?
Guess the word based on the given definition in each number. Write
the letters of the word inside the letter blocks below the definition.

Hint: Sound devices

o n o m a t o p o e i a

a l l i t e r a t i o n
a s s o n a n c e

c o n s o n a n c e
You learned in the previous meeting that poems are pieces of
writing written in separate lines. Aside from sound devices and
figurative language, there are elements that add beauty and
creativity to poems. These are rhyme and imagery.

Understanding Rhyme
A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds (or the same sound) in two
or more words, most often in the final syllables of lines in poems
and songs.

Example:
The apparition of these faces in the crowd
Petals on a wet, black bough
(“In A Station of the Metro” by Ezra Pound )

It was many and many a year ago,


In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of Annabel Lee;
(excerpt from “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe )
Understanding Sound Devices
Sound devices are tools used by poets to convey and reinforce the
meaning or experience of poetry through the skillful used of sound.
After all, poets are trying to use a concentrated blend of sound and
imagery to create an emotional response. In poetry, the words and
their order should evoke images, and the word themselves have
sounds, which can emphasize or otherwise clarify those images.

Types of Sound Devices


1. Onomatopoeia
This is a sound device which refers to the use of words whose
sounds suggest their meanings.

Examples:
The bang of a gun
The hiss of a snake
The buzz of a bee
The pop of a firecracker
2. Alliteration
This is the repetition of the same initial consonant sounds at the
beginning of at least two words in a line of poetry.

Examples:
the frog frolicked frivolously on the forest floor
Little skinny shoulder blades sticking through your clothes
...struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet

3. Assonance
This is the repetition of vowel sounds at the beginning, middle
or end of at least two words in a line of poetry.

Example:
“Hear the mellow wedding bells” (by Edgar Allan Poe)
4. Consonance
This is the repetition of consonant sounds at the middle or end
of at least two words in a line of poetry.

Examples:
He fumbles at your spirit
As players at the keys
Before they drop full music on;
He stuns you by degrees
(by Emily Dickenson )
Understanding Sensory Images
Words are not just letters printed on paper. They tell of things that
you see, hear, smell, taste and feel.

There are six sensory images in literature namely:


1. sight, which appeals to the sense of seeing;
2. sound, which appeals to the sense of hearing;
3. touch, which appeals to the sense of feeling;
4. taste, which appeals to the sense of taste;
5. smell, which appeals to the sense of smelling;
6. motion, which appeals to the sense of seeing with other
dimension, that is, movement.
Understanding Figurative Language
Writers use words in many different ways. Sometimes they tell what
happened very simply. Sometimes to make their meaning clearer,
they compare one thing to something else. When they do this, they
are using figurative language. Figurative language gives clearness,
force, and beauty to ideas and adds effectiveness to one’s speech
and writing. Figurative language uses figures of speech. A figure of
speech is any use of words in a sense different from their literal
definition.

The most common figures of speech are:


1. Simile
It is a comparison between unlike things that have one quality in
common on which the comparison is based. The comparison is
indicated by the expression like or as.

Examples:
The ship is like a plough plowing the sea.
My love is as red as a red, red rose.
2. Metaphor
It is an implied comparison between things essentially different but
having one quality in common on which the comparison is built. It is
an indirect comparison; hence the words like and as are NOT
used.

Example:
Contentment is a pearl of great price.

3. Personification
It is a figure of speech that ascribes intelligence or feeling to
abstract ideas or inanimate objects.

Example:
Did you hear the bells laugh and sing.

4. Hyperbole
It is an exaggeration made to achieve an effect.

Example:
Rhoda is a mountain of flesh.