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CHAPTER 14

Informative speaking
GOALS

1. Distinguish between informative and persuasive speaking


2. Explain the five different types informative speeches
3. Use guidelines to deliver a competent informative speech
4. Use specific visual aids to enhance your speeches
Choose your own adventure…

Agenda-

1. Go over chapter 14
2. Option a: watch an informative speech (and critique)
3. Option b: work in groups on your speech
INFORMATIVE VS. PERSUASIVE

● An informative speech focuses on teaching an audience something


new, interesting, and useful.
● A persuasive speech focuses on convincing listeners to change their
viewpoint and behavior.
INTENTIONS OF INFORMATIVE SPEAKING

● Focusing attention: Informative speeches direct an audience to think


about a specific topic.

● Non-controversial information: Speakers must maintain neutrality for


speech to be considered informative.

● Precursor to persuasion: Concern for a subject may be aroused through


informative speaking.
TYPES OF INFORMATIVE SPEECHES
1. Speeches that explain
a. Advances deep understanding of a specific issue
2. Speeches that demonstrate
a. Shows an audience how to use an object or perform a particular
task
3. Speeches that tell a story
a. Narrative about an event or occasion
4. Speeches that compare
a. Compare a variety of potential solutions without taking a stand on
any of the remedies offer
5. Speeches that report
a. Fulfills a class assignment, updates a committee, reveals the
results of a study
ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURE

● Define key terms: Speakers should define key terms, especially when
those terms are unfamiliar or technical.

● Signposts and transitions: Organizational markers that indicate the


structure of a speech and notify listeners that a particular point is
about to be addressed.

● Internal summaries: Restates a key point in the speech.


Visual Aids

There are several benefits to visual aids:


1.They can clarify difficult points or descriptions of complex objects.
2.They can gain and maintain audience attention.
3.They can enhance speaker credibility.
4.They can improve your delivery.
5.They are memorable.
Types of Visual Aids

1.Objects: There is no substitute for the real thing, but some objects may be
too large, too small, unavailable, or illegal.
2.Models: Allows you to show an object that is too small, too large, or
unavailable.
3.Graphs: Allows for numbers and trends to be displayed in an easily
understood format.
4.Tables: Creates a simple way to depict statistics, words of symbols.
Types of Visual Aids

1.Photographs: Can be a great substitute for objects, but they must be large
enough for the entire audience to see.
2.Drawings: Can serve the same purpose as a photograph when a suitable
photograph is unavailable, but the drawings must be neat and simple, and
look professional.
Visual Aids- Do’s and Don’ts

1.Keep aids simple: Visual aids should not have too much information for
the audience to reasonably absorb.
2.Make aids visible: Everyone in the room should be able to see the visual
aid.
3.Make aids neat and attractive: Unprofessional visual aids can distract
from the speaker’s message.
4.Don’t block the audience’s view: Talk to your audience, not to the visual
aid.
5.Keep aids close to you: You should not waste speech time traveling across
the room to retrieve your visual aid.
VISUAL AID ACTIVITY-

GET INTO GROUPS