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Introduction to Fashion Lighting Set-ups SetImage Examples Software Fashion Retouching Glossary
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Developed by Larrie Tiernan © larriepaultiernan

Introduction to Fashion Photography
‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ Learn about lighting for fashion How to work with models Working in different software programmes Creating a unique photograph from your fashion images Test your knowledge and skills Further resources to investigate and research

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Lighting Set-ups Set-

Assignment
‡ Using the following two lighting diagrams set up the studio with the appropriate lights. Experiment with the lighting, using the suggested power output for each light. Vary the lighting ratio, recording the power settings and the aperture for each light, using a light meter. Record this information in the form of a lighting diagram, with the appropriate image, as a visual example. Research and collect other examples of lighting diagrams for fashion photography as a starting point for your own personal ideas. Main Menu

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Creating lighting diagrams
‡ This file enables you to create sophisticated diagrams ‡ It is a Photoshop file with various folders. Clicking on the layer brings up a small graphic ‡ These can be repositioned by converting the graphic into a smart object ‡ This can then be rotated using Command T ( Control T for PC)

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© christian hough

© christian hough

Christian Hough ± Lighting Videos
Hough To: Fashion & Beauty - The Colours of Life http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2v3MrnDrQw&feature=channel Hough To: Hard light made easy http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JVjjmtfwHs&feature=channel Hough To: High Key & Low Key Lighting for fashion http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsUGbdT1hU c&feature=channel Hough To: Ringlite portraiture on a budget http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZnhW0IP8js&feature=channel

Christian¶s personal web site ±
http://www.christianhough.com/index2.php

Lighting Equipment

Portable strobe lighting

Fixed studio lighting

Honeycomb
‡ Used to emphasize texture

‡ Can be used as a hair light ‡ Used on the background as an effects light
‡ Placed behind the model, it works

as a rim light Honeycomb with Girds - Varying sizes

Soft Lighting - Fashion and Beauty Photography

Grid Diffuser

75 degree Softlite Reflector

Soft Lighting - Fashion and Beauty Photography

Supersoft 600

40 degree Sunlight Reflector

Working with Models

Model Release Form
A contract between a photographer and a model to agree where and how your images can be used. Without a signed release you may be unable to sell an image of a person, even if the subject was not a professional model and provided verbal consent. No stock library, for example, will accept a non-released image. Standard forms are available on the Internet. The Association of Photographer¶s website has standard forms supplied by Getty.

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Image Examples

Task 1 In this section you will see some examples of fashion photography. Using what you have learnt from your practical activities and by creating lighting diagrams, work out how these images where lit. Task 2 Use the Photoshop lighting file to create a set of lighting diagrams. Task 3 From your own experiments keep a record of the lighting set-ups you worked with during the fashion photography unit.

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Fashion Portfolio
using different lighting techniques famode

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© larriepaultiernan

© larriepaultiernan

© larriepaultiernan

© larriepaultiernan

© larriepaultiernan

© larriepaultiernan

Retouching - Fashion Photography

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Developed by Larrie Tiernan

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Professional retouching and digital make-up

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Contents
‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ step 1: Healing and Retouching step 2: Skin Smoothing step 3: Digital Make-up step 4: Eye Shadow step 5: Lip Alterations step 6: Whitening Eyes step 7: Changing Hair Colour step 8: Changing Eye Colour step 9: Face Sculpting step 10: Final Sharpening of Image

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Healing Brush Create separate layer for Healing Name layer: Healing Layer Click on the healing brush tool Sample: Use all layers / soft edged brush Use brush size 30 pixels Pick clean area of skin ALT click and retouch blemish

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Skin smoothing

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Skin smoothing New Layer above Healing layer Name layer: Skin Smoothing Use brush size 40 ± 80 pixels With paint brush selected change opacity to 20% (10% for more sweeps and working in a subtle manner) Press ALT key and sample a colour Smooth over blemish 1- 3 times This technique can reduce lines under eyes Helps reduce shine If you make a mistake Control Z (PC) Command Z (Mac)

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Digital Make-up

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Creative Make-up / Eye liner Create New Layer Name Layer: Eye Liner Zoom in on the eye using the Navigator Tool Hit D on the keyboard to set the foreground colour as BLACK Use brush size 10 pixels With paint brush selected change opacity to 20% (10% for more sweeps and working in a subtle manner) Run brush over area for µeye liner¶ Don¶t need to be too perfect Once you¶ve done one eye use Space Bar to scroll across to other eye Any mistakes can be removed by using the Eraser Tool Set opacity to 40% to remove mistakes

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Eye Shadow

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Creating Eye Shadow
Create New Layer Name Layer: Eye Shadow Use Polygonal Lasso Tool Draw around the area you want to designate as the Eye Shadow around one eye Hold down Shift Key and designate an area for Eye Shadow around the other eye This technique can be also used for the Cheekbone Hold down Shift Key and designate an area for the Cheekbone Feather selection by 30 pixels Go to SELECT, FEATHER and choose 20 pixels and click OK Create an ADJUSTMENT Layer Go to BLACK/WHITE Ikon on the Layers palette and click HUE/Saturation In the HUE/SATURATION Menu type in the following: HUE = -5 SATURATION = +18 LIGHTNESS = +28 These are starting points and can be modified dependent on the image Eye Shadow and Cheekbone can be modified separately

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Lip Alterations

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Lip alteration
Use POLYGONAL LASSO Tool Click around the lips keeping to the edge of the lip line Once the lips are selected FEATHER the selection SELECT, FEATHER and choose a feather of 5 pixels and click OK Make another ADJUSTMENT LAYER, select HUE/SATURATION In the HUE/SATURATION Menu type in the following: HUE SATURATION LIGHTNESS = -6 = +25 = -11

These are starting points and can be modified dependent on the image

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Whitening eyes

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Whitening Eyes
Use POLYGONAL LASSO Tool Click around the whites of the eye Add to the selection by holding down the Shift Key Hold down SPACE BAR, scroll to the other eye Add to the selection by holding down the Shift Key and select whites of other eye Once the whites of the eyes are selected FEATHER the selection SELECT, FEATHER and choose a feather of 5 pixels and click OK Make another ADJUSTMENT LAYER, select CURVES Click on the line and pull the CURVE slightly up Adjust appropriately

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Changing Hair Colour

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Changing Hair Colour
Create a new layer Name the Layer: Hair Use POLYGONAL LASSO Tool Click around the are of hair that you want to change colour SELECT, FEATHER and choose a feather of 30 pixels and click OK Make another Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer, Tick COLORIZE In the HUE/SATURATION Menu I typed in the following: HUE = +258 SATURATION = -30 LIGHTNESS = -23 Adjust appropriately to your own taste

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Changing Eye Colour

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Changing Eye Colour
Create a new layer Name the Layer: Eye Colour Use POLYGONAL LASSO Tool Click around the Iris of the eye Add to the selection by holding down the Shift Key Hold down SPACE BAR, scroll to the other eye Add to the selection by holding down the Shift Key and select Iris of other eye Once the Irises of the eyes are selected FEATHER the selection SELECT, FEATHER and choose a feather of 5 pixels and click OK Make another Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer, Tick COLORIZE In the HUE/SATURATION Menu I typed in the following: HUE = +258 SATURATION = -30 LIGHTNESS = -23 Adjust appropriately to your own taste

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Face Sculpting

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Face Sculpting
For this next technique we will need to crunch all of Layers into ONE Layer Look at all your Layers created so far Create a NEW Layer right at the top of the layers stack Hold down the ALT Key Click on the flyout in the layers palette arrow and without releasing the Mouse Button Click on MERGE VISIBLE this will merge all the layers together This is similar to Flattening without collapsing all of the Layers Main Menu

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Liquify Tool

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Using the Liquify Tool to re-sculpt the features of the FACE 1. Bloat Tool Go to FILTER and then LIQUIFY You are now in the LIQUIFY palette Click on the BLOAT Tool Choose a Brush size of 200 pixels in the Liquify Menu Move the CROSS HAIR over the centre of one of the eyes and click ONCE or TWICE Move the CROSS HAIR over the centre of the second of the eye and click Once or TWICE

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Using the Liquify Tool to re-sculpt the features of the FACE 1. Pucker Tool Go to FILTER and then LIQUIFY You are now in the LIQUIFY palette Click on the Pucker Tool Choose a Brush size of 200 pixels in the Liquify Menu Move the CROSS HAIR over the nose and sweep ONCE or TWICE

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Final Sharpening of Image

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Final Sharpening of Image SAVE Save the File as another PSD file format with a different name Flatten Image SHARPENING some of the Facial Features Us the POLYGONAL Lasso Tool Select around the central features of the face including the Eyebrows, Eyes Nose and Mouth Select, Feather and choose 100 pixels Then go to FILTER, SHARPEN and select UNSHARP MASK In the UNSHARP MASK menu choose Main Menu

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Final Image

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Software

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Software
Lightroom is a separate software programme which allows you to import images and work on them In an efficient workflow environment. It has a powerful raw conversion facility and allows for customized presets. You can create a library of images to be used in making a slide show, a website or to be printed out.

It is divided into five sections

Library Develop Slideshow Print Web

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Creating a Fashion Image
‡ In this section the photographer uses a particular lighting set-up ‡ Uses Lightroom with a downloaded preset ‡ Works in Photoshop to create an initial look ‡ Finishes off the image in Photoshop using retouching and filter techniques

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The key to this technique is to create a light tunnel, using foam board. This channels the light from the Beauty Dish onto the model, creating a soft light. The Honeycomb creates the hair light. The yellow gel provides the coloured light for the hair.
© larriepaultiernan

The post production in Lightroom and Photoshop creates a lighting effect reminiscent of the film 300.

Glossary

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Agency A modelling agency is responsible for representing and promoting its roster of models and booking jobs for them. Modelling agencies usually handle contracts, payments and the whole business side of the model's life. Agency Book The book agencies distribute to all of their clients to promote their models. The book contains the comp card for each model represented by the agency. Models are often required to pay a fee to have their comp card printed in the book. Beauty Shot A close-up shot of part or all of the face (lips, eyes, etc.). This kind of photo is usually used in a cosmetics print ad or in a magazine editorial about skin care products, and make-up products,. Bio The condensed story of a model's life - basically a resume with particular jobs highlighted. Bookout When you tell your agent you're not available for a job, for either professional or personal reasons, and the agent cannot book you during that time, you've "booked out" for that time. Clean-Clean A specification on a call-sheet that means clean hair, clean face. Models should show up for the photo shoot with no make-up on and freshly washed hair. The opposite of this is "hair and make-up ready," which is pretty self-explanatory.

Glossary
Composite Card Also referred to as a comp card, zed card or model business card. A comp card is a piece of card stock printed with at least two photos of you in various poses, settings, outfits and looks (the widest variety possible). It includes your name, your contact information, usually your agency's info and all your stats. Comp cards come in lots of different formats depending on the city, agency and the type of model or actor you are. Agencies will usually issue comp cards for you after they sign you. Contact Sheet Also called Proofs. A photographer's term for a sheet of film printed with small versions of all the photos taken during the photo shoot. From the contact sheet, the photographer and the client will choose which shots they want to print and enlarge. Cove Studio This is a photography studio that has no corners - instead, it's sort of rounded everywhere with built-in backdrops. In photographs, corners and edges (like where the wall meets the floor) tend to look ugly. A cove studio eliminates this effect. Seamless paper gives the same effect in a regular studio. Daylight Studio A photographic studio that is lit with natural light, usually by way of windows and skylights. Dresser The person who makes sure that clothes fit the model properly, and pins them if necessary. Fitting The session that takes place before the photo shoot where the clothes to be modelled are fit onto the model. Based on the model's particulars, the clothes are usually altered to fit. When models go to a fitting, they are expected to stand around partially clothed all day long, in front of several people. These people will usually be stylists, seamstresses and designers.

Glossary
Freelance Model A model listed with multiple agencies (as opposed to one particular agency) or a self-promoting model who works without an agent. Most commercial print models are freelance and work as independent contractors. Go-see A model's appointment to see a potential client. Halftime Models are paid halftime for all travel time. If your day rate is £50 an hour, you'll get £25 for each hour you travel to and from that job. Your agency also gets 20% of halftime travel rates. Head Sheet A poster displaying head shots and information about models represented by a modeling agency. Models may have to pay to appear on an agency's headsheet. Model Release A legal document provided by the client/photographer and signed by the model or agent. It gives permission to the photographer to use photographs taken at a particular sitting. If photographs are used without a release, or in a way different from what is stated in the release, then the model can sue for breach of contract. Photographer Release A contract signed by the photographer giving permission to the model to use the photographs taken during a particular sitting. Portfolio Also called a Book or Model's Book. A notebook containing a collection of a model's best photographs (usually size 8"x10") and tear sheets demonstrating their abilities in front of the camera. Models can usually purchase good portfolios stamped with their agency's name and logo directly from the agency, but plain black portfolios work fine, too.

Glossary
Prints For Time An agreement between the model and photographer, whereby they work for each other on a mutually beneficial basis, and no money changes hands. The photographer provides a selection of prints from the shoot in recognition of the model's time commitment. Resume Sheet listing a model's education, experience, and vital statistics. The resume is usually attached to an 8X10 or a composite. Tear Sheet The actual page torn from the magazine a model appeared in. Models put their tear sheets in their portfolios. Tearsheets are even better than photos, because it shows the kind of work the model has already done. Test Shoot When a model and photographer work together on a new idea or on their portfolios. No fees other than sharing film-and-developing expenses are involved. Model and Photographer Releases should be signed before the session. Usages Models get paid for each different medium in which their photograph is used. These different mediums, or usages, may include: consumer magazines, trade magazines, product packaging, print ads, bus ads, subway ads, billboards, magazine covers, direct mail, magazine editorials, posters, catalogues, brochures, point-ofpurchase (point-of-sale or p-o-p), annual reports, book covers, kiosk, duratrans (those big portable billboards that are towed around behind trucks), newspapers, etc. The model receives an additional fee for each usage the client buys. Usages also vary according to time and region. The longer the ad runs and the more markets in which it appears, all drive up the model's fee. The largest usage is the unlimited time usage, worldwide buyout. That means the client can plaster the photograph across every city in the world in every possible usage until the end of time.

Copyright Information © 2010
‡ Slide 14,15 Chrisitian Hough © Chrisitian Hough 2008 ‡ All other images Larrie Tiernan © larriepaultiernan 2010

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