You are on page 1of 11

AIRCRAFT BRAKE SYSTEM

Gp Capt Abdus Salam


BRAKE SYSTEM
• All modern aircraft are equipped with brakes.
• Their proper functioning is necessary for safe operation of the
aircraft on the ground.
i. The brakes slow the aircraft and stop it in a reasonable
amount of time.
ii. They hold the aircraft stationary during engine run-up
and
iii. in many cases, steer the aircraft during taxi.
INTRODUCTION
• On most aircraft, each of the main wheels is equipped with a
brake unit. The nose wheel or tail wheel does not have a
brake. In the typical brake system, mechanical and/or
hydraulic linkages to the rudder pedals allow the pilot to
control the brakes.
• The basic operation of brakes involves converting the kinetic
energy of motion into heat energy through the creation of
friction.
• A great amount of heat is developed and forces on the brake
system components are demanding.
• Proper adjustment, inspection, and maintenance of the
brakes is essential for effective operation.
TYPES AND CONSTRUCTION OF
AIRCRAFT BRAKES

 Single, dual, and multiple disc brakes are common types


of brakes.
 Segmented rotor brakes are used on large aircraft.
 Expander tube brakes are found on older large aircraft.
DISK BRAKE

• Modern aircraft typically use disc brakes.


• Single, dual, and multiple disc brakes are of common types.
• The disc rotates with the turning wheel assembly while a
stationary caliper resists the rotation by causing friction
against the disc when the brakes are applied.
• The size, weight, and landing speed of the aircraft influence
the design and complexity of the disc brake system.
SINGLE DISK BRAKE ASSEMBLY
DUAL DISK BRAKE ASSEMBLY
MULTIPLE DISK BRAKE ASSEMBLY
SEGMENTED ROTOR BRAKE ASSEMBLY
EXPANDER TUBE BRAKE ASSEMBLY
BRAKE ACTUATING SYSTEM
• All brake assemblies use hydraulic power to operate.
• Means of delivering the required hydraulic fluid pressure to
brake assemblies are different.
• There are three basic actuating systems:
i. An independent system not part of the aircraft main
hydraulic system
ii. A booster system that uses the aircraft hydraulic system
intermittently when needed
iii. A power brake system that only uses the aircraft main
hydraulic system as a source of pressure.