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Autism

Kori Herner
Psychosocial Dimension

• Meet with Connor’s parents before the school year to discuss his
behaviour what triggers him and how you should deal with it as a teacher,
his strengths and areas of challenge.

• Create an environment of mutual respect.

• Create a supportive, safe learning environment in which students can


learn without fear of being ridiculed or threatened.
Psychosocial Dimension

• Meet with Connor’s parents several times throughout the year to


discuss Connor’s progress, goals, and achievements.

• Communicate with all students clearly and effectively – show that I


am sensitive to students’ needs and concerns

• Involve social stories to teach social skills


Procedural Dimension

• Introduce class rules on the first day, and have a visual posted to help
Connor understand as his reading comprehension lacks.

• Reintroduce rules for the next couple classes so students understand what is
expected.

• Establish a daily routine for Connor

• Discuss with students’ consequences if rules are violated


Procedural Dimension

• Explain in detail and provide a demonstration of general procedures


you want students to follow so they fully understand

• Since Connor has developed oral language tell students they are
allowed to speak when they raise their hand

• Everyone in this class will be treated fairly and equally


Physical Dimension

• Connor works better independently, so allow him to have his own space while
doing assignments with a TA and progress to working in groups for social aspect

• Seat Connor towards the front of the class so he is in close proximity of the
teacher

• Provide Connor with social narratives to provide support and instruction to


convey content.

• Have a computer in the class to allow Connor to work on his assignments

• Have signs posted providing nonverbal cautions for Connor to help him
understand
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Behavioural Dimension

• Use appropriate academic, environmental, social and sensory supports and


modification to environment and expectations to prevent Connor’s behaviour.

• Provide Connor with social narratives to provide support and instruction to convey
content.

• Create a rewards program for Connor. Motivate him, that if he possessive positive
behaviour he will be rewarded with something he enjoys. Ex: computer time, Star
Trek

• If Connor is acting out, cope with these challenges and get him back on task.

• Provide Connor a visual of self care skills and social boundaries


Instructional Dimension

• Have a set schedule for Connor that has the same classes at the same time
every day (routine) so he does not become anxious

• Provide a visual of daily schedule

• Focus on eye contact when speaking with Connor

• Use social stories to explain tasks or skills to Connor


Instructional Dimension

• In math help Connor with simple techniques to remember what formulas to use

• Use computers for lessons and visuals – help Connor learn better

• Allow more time for Connor to complete assignments

• Warn Connor of changes in routine, upcoming transitions, and remaining time

• To help with Connor’s reading compression work with him to retell what he has read
Organizational Dimension

• Provide a schedule of daily activities for Connor -information on what is


happening, in what order, and any changes to the regular routine

• Keep notes on Connor’s behaviour what went good and what could have been
better

• Meet with TA and parents regularly to discuss how Connor is doing in class,
behaviours, strengths and challenges and come up with new solutions and or
strategies

• Establish a good working relationship with support personal

• Meet with recourse teacher to discuss Connor’s progress & behaviour


References

Autism Speaks Inc. (2012). Supporting Learning in the Student with Autism. Retrieved
from https://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/sctk_supporting_learning.pdf

Dayna International Inc, and Orgnization for Autism Research. (2005). Life Journey
Through Autism: An Educator’s Guide to Asperger Syndrome. Retrieved from
https://researchautism.org/resources/an-educators-guide-to-asperger-syndrome/

Smith, T. E. C., Polloway, E. A., Patton, J. R., Dowdy, C. A., Heath, N., and McIntyre, L.
J. (2006). Teaching Students with Special Needs in Inclusive Settings, Fifth Canadian
Edition. Pearson: Toronto, Ontario. ISBN: i9780134396941

Wright, K. (2001). 20 Classroom Modifications for Students with Autism. Retrieved from
http://tcsps.sharpschool.net/UserFiles/Servers/Server_981069/File/Migrated%20Docum
ents/20_classrm_modifications_for_students_with_autism.pdf