Topics to be Discussed

     

 

Superposition Theorem. Thevenin¶s Theorem. Norton¶s Theorem. Maximum Power Transfer Theorem. Maximum Power Transfer Theorem for AC Circuits. Millman¶s Theorem. Reciprocity Theorem. Tellegen¶s Theorem.
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Network Theorems   

Some special techniques, known as network theorems and network reduction methods, have been developed. These drastically reduce the labour needed to solve a network. These also provide simple conclusions and good insight into the problems.

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Superposition Principle

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Superposition Theorem 

The response (current or voltage) in a linear network at any point due to multiple sources (current and/or emf) (including linear dependent sources), can be calculated by summing the effects of each source considered separately, all other sources ³turned OFF´ or ³made inoperative´.  

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´Turning offµ the sources

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Linear Dependent Source  

It is a source whose output current or voltage is proportional only to the first power of some current or voltage variable in the network or to the sum of such quantities. Examples :

v s ! 0.6i1  16v 2 is linear, v s ! 0.6i
2 1

but,

or

v s ! 0.6i1v 2 is not linear.
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Application 

Problem : Consider two 1-V batteries in series with a 1- resistor. Let us apply the principle of superposition, and find the power delivered by both the batteries. Solutions : Power delivered by only one source working at a time is P1 = 1 W
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Therefore, the power delivered by both the sources, P = 2P1 = 2 W The above answer is obviously wrong, because it is a wrong application of the superposition theorem. 

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Example 1
Find the current I in the network given, using the superposition theorem.

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Solution :

0.5 v 0.3  0.15 I1 !  ! ! 0.375 A 0.1  0.3 0.4
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80 v 10 3 I2 ! ! 0.2 A 0.1  0.3 @ I ! I 1  I 2 ! 0.1 A
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Example 2
Using superposition theorem, find current ix in the network given.

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Solution :

10 i1 ! ! 0.05A 50  150
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150 i2 ! 40 v ! 30 A 50  150
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50 i3 ! 120 v ! 30 A 50  150
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ix ! i1  i2  i3 ! 0.05  30  30 ! 0.05 A

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Benchmark Example 3
Find voltage v across 3- resistor by applying the principle of superposition.

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Solution :

Using current divider,
1 2 i ! 4v ! A 1  (2  3) 3

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v4 ! i v R ! (2/3 A) v (3 ) ! 2.0 V
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Using current-divider, the voltage v5 across 3-

« » 1 v5 ! ¬ 5 v A ¼ v (3 ;) ! 2.5V 1  (2  3) ­ ½
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By voltage divider,
3 v6 ! 6 v ! 3.0 V 1 2  3

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v !  v4  v5  v6 ! 2.0  2.5  3.0 ! 2.5 V
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Example 4
Find current i2 across R2 resistor by applying the principle of superposition. Where R1=R2=R3=1and S=10 , b= 5 , = .

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Thevenin¶s Theorem    

It was first proposed by a French telegraph engineer, M.L. Thevenin in 1883. There also exists an earlier statement of the theorem credited to Helmholtz. Hence it is also known as Helmholtz-Thevenin Theorem. It is useful when we wish to find the response only in a single resistance in a big network.

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Thevenin¶s Theorem 

Any two terminals AB of a network composed of linear passive and active elements may by replaced by a simple equivalent circuit consisting of
1. 2.

an equivalent voltage source Voc, and an equivalent resistance th in series.

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The voltage Voc is equal to the potential difference between the two terminals AB caused by the active network with no external resistance connected to these terminals. The series resistance Rth is the equivalent resistance looking back into the network at the terminals AB with all the sources within the network made inactive, or dead. 

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Illustrative Example 3 

Using Thevenin¶s theorem, find the current in
resistor R2 of 2 .

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Solution :
1. Designate the resistor R2 as ³load´.

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2. Pull out the load resistor and enclose the remaining network within a dotted box.

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3. Temporarily remove the load resistor R2, leaving the terminals A and B open .

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4. Find the open-circuit voltage across the terminals AB,

28  7 21 I! ! ! 4.2 A; 5 4 1 VAB ! 7  4.2 v 1 ! 11.2
5. This is called Thevenin voltage, VTh = VAB = 11.2 .

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6. Turn OFF all the sources in the circuit

Find the resistance between terminals A and B. This is the Thevenin resistance, RTh. Thus,
1v 4 RTh ! 1 ; || 4 ; ! ! 0.8 1 4
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7. The circuit within the dotted box is replaced by the Thevenin¶s equivalent, consisting of a voltage source of VTh in series with a resistor RTh,

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8. The load resistor R2 is again connected to Thevenin¶s
equivalent forming a single-loop circuit. ‡ The current I2 through this resistor is easily calculated,

VTh 11.2 I2 ! ! !4 A RTh  R2 0.8  2

Important Comment The equivalent circuit replaces the circuit within the box only for the effects external to the box.

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Example 4 

Using Thevenin¶s Theorem, find the current in the ammeter A of resistance 1.5 connected in an unbalanced Wheatstone bridge shown.

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Solution :

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12 I1 ! ! 0.75 A and 12  4 12 I2 ! ! 1.5 A 26 @ Voc ! VAB ! VAD  VBD ! 0.75 v 4  1.5 v 6 ! 6 V

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Ans. -1 A

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Benchmark Example 5
Again consider our benchmark example to determine voltage across 3- resistor by applying Thevenin¶s theorem.

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Solution : ‡ We treat the 3- resistor as load. ‡ Thevenin voltage VTh is the open-circuit voltage (with RL removed). ‡ We use source transformation.

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@

VTh ! 5 v 1 ! 5 V

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To compute RTh, we turn off all the sources in the circuit within box and get the circuit

Thus, RTh = 3 .
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3 VL ! 5 v ! 2.5 V 3 3
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Thevenin¶s Theorem for dependent sources
Case-I : When circuit contain both dependent and independent sources.
(i)

(ii)

(iii)
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The open circuit voltage is determined as usual with the sources activated or alive. A sort circuited is applied across the terminal ab and the value of sort circuit current isc is found as usual. Now the thevenin¶s resistance Rth = Voc/isc
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Thevenin¶s Theorem for dependent sources
Case-II : When circuit contain only dependent sources.
(i) (ii)

(iii)

In this case, Voc = 0. We connect 1A source to terminal ab and calculate the value of Vab. Now the thevenin¶s resistance Rth = Vab/1

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WORKED EXAMPLE 3

Find Thevenin¶s Equivalent circuit across terminal ab.

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Norton¶s Theorem 


It is dual of Thevenin¶s Theorem. A two terminal network containing linear passive and active elements can be replaced by an equivalent circuit of a constantcurrent source in parallel with a resistance.

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The value of the constant-current source is the short-circuit current developed when the terminals of the original network are short circuited. The parallel resistance is the resistance looking back into the original network with all the sources within the network made inactive (as in Thevenin¶s Theorem).
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Example 6 

Obtain the Norton¶s equivalent circuit with respect to the terminals AB for the network shown, and hence determine the value of the current that would flow through a load resistor of 5 if it were connected across terminals AB.

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Solution : When terminals A-B are shorted

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10 5 I ! I1  I 2 !  ! 2.5 5 10
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Turning OFF the sources,

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5 v 10 10 ! RN ! 5  10 3
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RN (10 / 3) IL ! IN ! 2.5 v ! 1A RN  RL (10 / 3)  5

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Norton¶s Theorem for dependent sources
Case-I : When circuit contain both dependent and independent sources.
(i)

(ii)

(iii)
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The open circuit voltage is determined as usual with the sources activated or alive. A sort circuited is applied across the terminal ab and the value of sort circuit current isc is found as usual. Now the Norton¶s resistance RN = Voc/isc
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Norton¶s Theorem for dependent sources
Case-II : When circuit contain only dependent sources.
(i) (ii)

(iii)

In this case, ISC = 0. We connect 1A source to terminal ab and calculate the value of Vab. Now the thevenin¶s resistance RN = Vab/1

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Find Norton¶s Equivalent circuit across terminal ab.

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WORKED EXAMPLE 3

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Power Transferred to the Load 

Consider the circuit :

r E

p
(Variable)

RL

Source

Load

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p pmax

Maximum power is transferred when RL = r.

0

RL = r

RL

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Proof
¨ E ¸ ¹ RL p!© ©R r¹ ª L º 2 dp 2 ( RL  r ) v 1  RL v 2( RL  r ) v 1 @ !E 4 dRL ( RL  r ) or maximizing, e put numerator equal to zero. ( RL  r )?( RL  r )  2 RL A! 0
2

r  RL ! 0
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Maximum Power Transfer Theorem 

Maximum power is drawn form a source when the Load Resistance is equal to the Source Internal Resistance. When maximum power transfer condition is satisfied, we say that the load is matched with the source. Under maximum power transfer condition, the efficiency of the source is only 50 %.
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Available Power
What is the maximum power that a source of emf E and internal resistance r can ever deliver ?
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Ans.

E 4r

2

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Prove that under maximum power transfer condition, the efficiency of the source is only 50 %.

Po I RL ! 2 v 100 % L| Pin I ( RL  r ) ! 50 %

2

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Example 7
The open-circuit voltage of a standard car-battery is 12.6 V, and the short-circuit current is approximately 300 A. What is the available power from the battery ?
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Solution : The output impedance of the battery,

Voc 12.6 Ro ! ! ! 0.042 ; I sc 300
Therefore, the available power
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2 Th 2 oc 2

V V (12.6) Pavl ! ! ! ! 945 W 4 RTh 4 Ro 4 v 0.042
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Millman·s Theorem 

A number of parallel voltage sources V1, V2, V3 «, Vn with internal resistances R1, R2, R3«, Rn, respectively can be replaced by a single voltage source V in series with equivalent resistance R.

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Equivalent Circuit

and
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V1G1  V2G2  V3G3 ...  Vn Gn V! G1  G2  G3 ...  Gn 1 1 R! ! G G1  G2  G3 ...  Gn
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Reciprocity Theorem 

In a linear bilateral network, if a voltage source V in a branch A produces a current I in any other branch B, then the same voltage source V acting in the branch B would produce the same current I in branch. 

The ratio V/I is known as the transfer resistance.
Let us verify the reciprocity theorem by considering an example.
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Example 8
‡ In the network shown, find the current in branch B due to the voltage source of 36 V in branch A. ‡ Now transfer the voltage source to branch B and find the current in branch A. ‡ Is the reciprocity theorem established ? ‡ Also, determine the transfer resistance from branch A to branch B.

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Solution : The equivalent resistance for the voltage source,

Req ! 2  [12 || (3  1)]  4 ! 2  3  4 ! 9 ;
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The current supplied by the voltage source = 36/9 = 4 A. Using current divider, the current I in branch B,
12 I ! 4v !3A 12  4

Now, transferring the voltage source to branch B,

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The equivalent resistance for the voltage source,
Req ! 3  [12 ( 2  4)]  1 ! 3  4  1 ! 8 ;

The current supplied by the voltage source = 36/8 = 4.5 A. Using current divider, the current I¶ in branch A, 12 I ' ! 4. 5 v !3A 12  6 The transfer resistance

V 36 Rtr ! ! ! 12 I 3
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Tellegen¶s Theorem. 
  

It was published in 1952 by Bernard Tellegen. It is valid for any lumped network that contains any elements, linear or nonlinear, passive or active. It simply state that the sum of instantaneous power delivered to each branch of a network is zero. If there are b branches in a lumped circuit, and the voltage uk, current ik of each branch apply passive sign convention, then we have
b

§
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u k ik ! 0
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k !1
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Example 9
‡ In the network shown in Fig 42, Verify Tellegen's theorem. The
values of components used are presented below. V1=15V, V2= 6V, R1=2 , R2=3 , R3=3 , R4=2 R5= 5 , R6=3 .

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Review 
     

Superposition Theorem. Thevenin¶s Theorem. Norton¶s Theorem. Maximum Power Transfer Theorem. Maximum Power Transfer Theorem for AC Circuits. Millman¶s Theorem. Reciprocity Theorem.

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