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GRAMMAR REVIEW

GROUP 6 (SIX)
NAME: 1.DINDA ARISTA KHOLIFATURRAHMAH
2.FERDIANSYAH RAMADHAN
3.INDAH APRILIA
4.FAJRI RAMADHAN
ADJECTIVES
Definition
Adjectives are words that describe or modify another person or thing in the
sentence. The Articles — a, an, and the — are adjectives.

• the tall professor


• the lugubrious lieutenant
• a solid commitment
• a month's pay
• a six-year-old child
• the unhappiest, richest man

If a group of words containing a subject and verb acts as an adjective, it is called


an Adjective Clause. My sister, who is much older than I am, is an engineer. If an
adjective clause is stripped of its subject and verb, the resulting modifier becomes
an Adjective Phrase: He is the man who is keeping my family in the poorhouse.
Degrees of Adjectives

• Adjectives can express degrees of


modification:
• Gladys is a rich woman, but Josie is richer than
Gladys, and Sadie is the richest woman in
town.
Positive Comparative Superlative

rich richer richest

lovely lovelier loveliest

beautiful more beautiful most beautiful


Certai adjectives have irregular forms in the comparative and superlative degrees:

Irregular Comparative and Superlative Forms

good better best

bad worse worst

little less least

much
many more most
some

far further furthest


Grammar's Response

• According to Bryan Garner, "complete" is one of


those adjectives that does not admit of
comparative degrees. We could say, however,
"more nearly complete." I am sure that I have
not been consistent in my application of this
principle in the Guide (I can hear myself, now,
saying something like "less adequate" or "more
preferable" or "less fatal"). Other adjectives that
Garner would include in this list are as follows:
absolute impossible principal

adequate inevitable stationary

chief irrevocable sufficient

complete main unanimous

devoid manifest unavoidable

entire minor unbroken

fatal paramount unique

final perpetual universal

ideal preferable whole


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