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 Welcome! We

will get started shortly. you wait, please review the definitions on pages 8³10 of the handbook. 

As

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The Public Humanities Toolbox: Engaging Communities Online
Leah Nahmias & Al Lees John Nicholas Brown Center October 2010

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9:00³10:15 am: Toolbox Overview  Introductions  What is the Public Humanities Toolbox?  What tools are included and what are their basic features? 10:15³10:25 am: Break 10:25³11:00 am: Examples of the Tools in Use  WordPress  Flickr  Wikis  Google Maps  Catablogs  Mobile Apps 11:00³12:00 am: Planning and Consulting on Your Projects  A Strategy for Web Projects  Small group break-outs  Report back 



Today·s Schedule 

Pleased to meet you!
Tell us your name, your organization, and what drives your interest in digital projects +

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What is The Public Humanities Toolbox? 

A framework (or toolbox) of free or inexpensive Web 2.0 applications to build a more engaging web presence Designed for small cultural heritage organizations with limited budgets, staff, and expertise Explains uses and ´how-tosµ for blogs, wikis, Google Maps, Flickr (photographs), Scribd (documents), Facebook, Twitter, podcasting, and more http://publichumanitiestoolbox.wordpress.com 
    

Download the complete handbook for free Find examples of tools in use Download this entire presentation starting this evening

+ What do we mean by ´frameworkµ? 
Start

with a blog as your website·s base (the framework) the blog with pages for different aspects of the organization (or project)  

Customize

About, Collections, Educators Resources, Public Programs, Hours & Directions 

Embed

other applications into your blog depending on what you want to share³photos, maps, videos, documents other social media tools to help you reach new audiences, network with other professionals, build meaningful and rich relationships 

Use

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Web 2.0

The types of «  INTERACTIVE (tag, comment, respond, favorite)  COLLABORATIVE (many people editing, adding content from different places)  INTEROPERABLE (all the parts work together³embedded³to create one seamless whole)  web applications developed after the dot com bust of 2000-2001 The ways users interact with each other and with content enabled by these applications Characterized by the ease with which non-expert³That·s us! That·s you!³can add content to the web  

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Our goals? This speech and beyond 

Above all: it·s possible!  What are the opportunities?  What are the tools?  How do you use the tools? To make local history instantly and easily accessible To broaden the scope of local history To make it easier for teachers and students to incorporate local history To increase collaboration among small cultural heritage organizations    

Tools 
WordPress  Flickr  Scribd  Google  Wikis  Facebook  Twitter  Mobile Technologies  «And

(blogs)

Maps

& Social Networking

more!

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WordPress 
Basic

web publishing platform; a blog customizable 

Highly  Free!  Lots

of users: Advice! Help! New features all the time! versions:  Fast and Easy WordPress  Bigger and Better WordPress 

Two

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Flickr 


A photo-sharing site Upload your photos; allow your users to view, comment, make notes, share with their friends, even ´favoriteµ items in your collection Uses: 
     

Promote current or upcoming exhibits (tease with a few items in the collection) Draw viewers· attention to details by making notes on items Collect information about unknown items in your collection Embed items hosted in Flickr in your blog or on Google Maps Collect tags labeling items; share a tag cloud showing your collection·s strengths Easily collect data about view counts and what sites and search terms are helping users find your content

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Google Maps 

Create your own maps 


By time period By theme (African American history, agricultural activities) 



Create driving or walking tours of a site or town Map points described in an oral history or diary

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Scribd 
    

The Flickr of documents; sharing documents Allows users to embed documents in other sites like blogs Allows social media functions: tags, comments, favorites, etc. Works for all file types (Word, Excel, PDF, Power Point) All text is indexed and searchable Share« 
  

Educational resources: lesson plans, registration forms Transcriptions Brochures and other literature Meeting minutes, annual reports, other organizational literature

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Twitter 
´Micro-bloggingµ  Provide

status updates (what you·re doing, thinking, reading, etc.) of 140 characters or less others«see their updates on your homepage follow you too 

Follow 

Others

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Twitter 
Follow

professionals or consultants in your field«keep abreast of new ideas, latest literature other institutions«how are they using Twitter to build or maintain relationships quick updates on events 

Follow 

Share  Share

fun like ´this week in historyµ or brain teasers related to local history

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Catablogs 

A catablog is a site created with blogging software that provides short descriptions of collections via blog posts. These posts can be easily tagged, categorized and updated, and can contain image and media files. Your community can follow your RSS feed to keep up-to-date on new collections as they are added and easily link to collection descriptions to share their finds with others. Great for genealogists! There·s already a catablog plug-in for WordPress«and we·re curious!   



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Web 2.0: Product or Process? 

Web 2.0 tools are interactive³you can allow users to comment on, tag, mash-up and even edit your content Some organizations worry about ´losing controlµ of their content: will ´theirµ content be accurate, respectful, etc? Some organizations worry about ´letting goµ of their expertise: will they need us if we let them have our ´stuffµ? We suggest looking at Web 2.0 tools as process as much as product³they are a way of engaging a community as much as a way of creating a finished product 
   

This is the opportunity presented by today·s economic crisis This is the thinking that will help us survive 

By the way, all of the tools we profile can be amended to prevent comments, tags, editing, etc.

Toolbox 1.0
Flat

Toolbox 1.5
Carefully Managed Content
Communication is still one-way, but you are putting more of your collections out there for the public to find You may simply be putting your collections database online or building simple online exhibits You retain control of the content but potentially reach a larger audience than a collection or exhibit housed in a physical location can

Toolbox 2.0
Free for All Third Space
The difference here is that communication is two-way Your public comments on your content and discusses it among themselves in a forum you have created Other tools might allow users to create their own content in a variety of ways: sharing images or documents held in their private collections, creating and editing encyclopedia entries about your community, or sharing their personal memories

Communication is oneway You as the institution post information (about yourself) so that people can find your building and learn about programs and exhibits

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What·s the difference between
Availability? 
You·re

Accessibility? 
Your

open can find you 

People  If

tools make your collections and resources« 


they can get to your physical location, they can look through your collections you produce  

They ´consumeµ what

Easier to find Easier to navigate and search Open for reflection, discussion, and personal meaningmeaningmaking

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Be

back promptly at 10:25 you came today with a specific project or digital ´problemµ to be solved, please see Leah during the break 

If

Break

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9:00³10:15 am: Toolbox Overview  Introductions  What is the Public Humanities Toolbox?  What tools are included and what are their basic features? 10:15³10:25 am: Break 10:25³11:00 am: Examples of the Tools in Use  WordPress  Flickr  Wikis  Google Maps  Catablogs  Mobile Apps 11:00³12:00 am: Planning and Consulting on Your Projects  A Strategy for Web Projects  Small group break-outs  Report back 



Today·s Schedule 

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Sites Built with the Toolbox!
Pioneer Valley History Network Veterans Education Project

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More sites!
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association 

PVMA used to have a website built by outside developers 


It was expensive It was difficult for PVMA staff and volunteers to change or add content to their own website

The MobileJNBC Project

Why Mobile Now?
In 2009, 17% of US adults used smartphones, up from smartphones, 11% in 2008 and 7% in 2007 and that fully one in three Americans now own a smartphone or QMD (quick messaging devise), statistics that, by any measure indicate an exponential growth curve. In a world where instant access to information, products and services is becoming an expectation, mobile technology as an information gateway will fundamentally alter how, when and why individuals experience and consume a vast array of goods and services, including culture and heritage.

Project Assumptions 

Web based mobility is preferable to native apps (iPhone), even when one must contend with slower connectivity. Cultural organizations can extend their knowledge of Wordpress to create a pleasing mobile experience. The future of accessing information mobily will either equal or surpass the desktop/laptop within the next 10 years.  

Consider These Points: 
Mobile gateways

emphasize breadth not depth of information. site attractive and easy to navigate. It draws the viewer in. Heavy emphasis on images should be discouraged. site should engage, keeping the viewer involved and occupied, and; should be enabling, letting the viewer do or see things they could never do before. 

Make you 

Your 

It

Form Follows Function 
What  How

is our mobile purpose? do we wish to interact with our audience? tools would we like to deploy? 

What

The point is the what and how of it is more important than its visual appeal!

Examples
National Museum of Natural History

Musee du Louvre

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A Strategy for Web Projects 

What are your organization·s goals? Who is your intended audience? What sort of ´voiceµ will your organization have online? Self-Assessment  

Where are you now? Where is your staff? What do you know how to do? What do you need to learn to achieve your goals? Page 11-12 of the Handbook  

What functions do you need? 

Choose tools (allow form to follow function) 

PLAN CAREFULLY! What are the key ´categoriesµ /organizing principles of your site? Who will do what work? Who will maintain it? Map it out 

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9:00³10:15 am: Toolbox Overview  Introductions  What is the Public Humanities Toolbox?  What tools are included and what are their basic features? 10:15³10:25 am: Break 10:25³11:00 am: Examples of the Tools in Use  WordPress  Flickr  Wikis  Google Maps  Catablogs  Mobile Apps 11:00³12:00 am: Planning and Consulting on Your Projects  A Strategy for Web Projects  Small group break-outs  Report back 



Today·s Schedule 

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Divide into small groups of 3-4 Group Roles  Observer/Facilitator: Keeps the group on task, takes notes  Requestor (someone to share an idea for a project or a ´digital problemµ to be solved)  1-2 consultants Break-out Procedure (35 minutes)  5 minutes: Requestor describes project; group asks clarifying questions  10 minutes: Using pages 13-14 and 17-18, start to consider tools and how they would be customized to fit the proposed project  12 minutes: Create a ´next stepsµ plan  5 minutes: Consider obstacles: staff/volunteer expertise, buy-in from community, time constraints  3 minutes: formulate a question or issue that arose during the charette to share with the whole group  Leah and Al will circulate during break-out sessions to consult and help Share-outs & Conclusions 

Small group breakout protocol 

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Social media is like a free kitten:
A piece of advice

easy to get one, but then you have to take care of it!

+ Thanks!
Leah Nahmias (leah_nahmias@yahoo.com) Twitter.com/lnahmias Al Lees (aelees@mac.com) http://publichumanitiestoolbox.wordpress.com Follow our RSS feed

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