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SEMINAR ON

“WIND TURBINES”
By- UJJWAL NAUTIYAL
B.TECH(ME) VI-B
1014366 (32)
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Contents
 What is wind turbine?
 Classification of wind turbines
 Parts of a wind turbine
 Advantages & Disadvantages

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A turbine is a rotary mechanical device
that extracts energy from a fluid flow and
converts it into mechanical work.
 A turbine is a turbomachine with at least
one moving part called a rotor assembly
which is a shaft or drum
with blades attached.
 Moving fluid acts on the blades so that
they move and impart rotational energy
to the rotor.

What is a turbine?
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 Wind is caused by differences in
the atmospheric pressure. When
a difference in atmospheric
pressure exists, air moves from the higher
to the lower pressure area, resulting in
winds of various speeds.
 A wind turbine is a device that
converts kinetic energy from the wind into
electrical power.

What is wind & wind turbine?


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Classification
CLASSIFICATION of Wind
OF WIND TURBINE
Turbine
1.On the 2.On the
3.On the basis of
basis of basis of axis
no. of blades
location of rotation

2.1.Horizontal 2.2.Vertical 3.3.Three


3.1.Single 3.2.Double
1.1.onshore 1.2.offshore axis wind axis wind bladed
bladed bladed
turbine turbine turbine

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1.ON THE BASIS OF LOCATION
 1. Onshore:
 Onshore wind turbines are placed in
hilly and mountainous places and
are at least three kilometers away
from the nearest shore.

 2. Near-shore
Near-shore wind turbines are installed
within three kilometers from the
nearest shore or on water within
ten kilometers from land.

 3.Offshore
 Offshore wind turbines’ developement
zones are at least ten kilometers away from land.
2. ON THE BASIS OF AXIS OF ROTATION
1.Horizontal axis of rotation

 It is able to produce more electricity from


a given amount of wind.
 It is heavier & does not produce well in
turbulent flow.

2.Vertical axis of rotation


Omnidirectional
Accepts wind from any angle
Components can be mounted at ground level
Ease of service
Lighter weight towers
Can theoretically use less materials to capture the same
amount of wind.
Requires support at top of turbine rotor.
1.Single bladed turbine

3.Three bladed turbine


2.Double bladed turbine
• Rotor must move more
rapidly to capture same • Advantages &
amount of wind disadvantages
• Gearbox ratio reduced • Balance of
similar to one
gyroscopic
• Added weight of blade
forces
counterbalance • Need shock
negates some benefits • Slower rotation
absorbers
of lighter design because of • increases
• Higher speed means gyroscopic gearbox &
more noise, visual, imbalances transmission
costs
and wildlife impacts • Capture 5% less
• Blades easier to install energy than • More aesthetic,
because entire rotor can three blade less noise,
be assembled on designs fewer bird
ground. strikes

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Location for a wind turbine

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Parts of a wind turbine

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The wind blows day and night which allows windmills to
produce electricity throughout the day. (Faster during the
day)
Wind power is available in ample amounts in all coastal
areas.
It does not produce any carbon dioxide.
It is a renewable energy.
There is no use of fossil fuels.
Almost 95% of the land in use can be used for
farming/recreational purpose.
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The strength of the wind is not constant and
it varies from zero to storm force. This means
that wind turbines do not produce the same
amount of electricity all the time. There will be
times when they produce no electricity at all.
Large wind farms are needed to provide entire
communities with enough electricity. For
example, the largest single turbine available
today can only provide enough electricity for
475 homes, when running at full capacity. How
many would be needed for a town of 100000
people?
Capital cost of installing a wind turbine is very high.
Land acquisitions by the governments may also create
Reference

 www.coursera.org
 en.wikipedia.org

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