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Material Handling Safety

at Surface Mines, Mills, and Plants

Introduction
Contents
• Introduction (Section 1, slide 3) • Mechanical Handling of
• Suggested Usage (slide 3) Materials (Section 3, slide 68)
• Forklifts (slide 69)
• Background (slide 4)
• Hoists (slide 95)
• Course Objectives (slide 8) • Dollies and Carts (slide 101)
• Accident/Injury Problem (slide 9) • Jacks, “Come-Alongs,” Etc. (slide 102)
• Conclusions/Summary (slide 14) • Risk Assessment (slide 103)
• Sample Quiz (slide 15) • Section Review Summary (slide 106)
• Sample Quiz (slide 107)

• Manual Handling of Materials • Stacking and Storage (Section 4,
(Section 2, slide 16) slide 110)
• Lifting and Moving Material (slide 16) • Storage (slide 111)
• Risk Assessment (slide 30) • Disposal (slide 119)
• Section Review Summary (slide 120)
• Additional Discussion Topics (slide 33)
• Sample Quiz (slide 121)
• Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and
Recovery (slide 38)
• Conclusion (Section 5, slide 123)
• Section Review Summary (slide 64) • Summary (slide 123)
• Sample Quiz (slide 65) • Sample Test (slide 124)

Section 1
Introduction
Suggested Usage
• Tailor to Audience

• Presentation Techniques
– Small Segments (not all at once)
– Questions & Discussion
– Participation Exercises

• Presentation Time

• Mandatory & Non-mandatory Training

• Primarily for Surface Mining
– Regulations for surface areas of underground mines are handled differently for M/NM
and coal mines.
• Part 56 – Surface M/NM Mines, 30 CFR § 56.1 Purpose and scope.
• Part 57 – Underground M/NM Mines, 30 CFR § 57.1 Purpose and scope.
• Part 75 – Underground Coal Mines, 30 CFR § 75.1 Scope.
• Part 77 – Surface Coal Mines and Surface Work Areas of Underground Coal Mines,
30 CFR § 77.1 Scope.

Section 1 Introduction Background This project was developed as part of the alliance between and the in cooperation with .

lumber. barrels. kegs. Introduction -.Background Section 1 Handling and Storing Materials Involves diverse operations. They are for informational and educational purposes only. such as: • Manual material handling  Lifting or carrying bags or materials  Unpacking materials • Mechanical material handling  Forklifts  Hoists  Other equipment • Stacking or storing drums. . loose bricks or other materials Internet Links1 Materials Handling and Storage – OSHA Materials Handling and Storage – OSHA Construction Safety and Health Outreach Program 1Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA.

Introduction – Background (continued) Section 1 Hazards Hazards include: • Improper manual lifting or carrying loads that are too large or heavy • Being struck by materials or being caught in pinch points • Being crushed by machines. falling materials or improperly stored materials • Incorrectly cutting ties or securing devices .

examination. certified person. MSHA Policy on § 56. Introduction – Background (continued) Section 1 Workplace and Equipment Examinations are important. correction and records.14100 Safety defects. reports of inspection.1606 Loading and haulage equipment. and are required.18002 Examination of working places.14100 30 CFR § 56.1713 Daily inspection of surface coal mine. . MSHA Policy on § 56. 30 CFR § 77. inspection and maintenance.18002 Surface Coal 30 CFR § 77. See web links below: Surface Metal and Nonmetal 30 CFR § 56.

• Given statements about. • Given statements about. Section 1 Introduction Course Objectives • Given statements of accident and injury problems the student will be able to identify those that are historically true of material handling. the student will identify correct statements and safe methods. with at least 80% accuracy. and methods of accomplishing manual materials handling. the student will identify correct statements and safe methods. and methods of accomplishing mechanical materials handling. and methods of accomplishing stacking and storage of materials. with at least 80% accuracy. • Given statements about. with at least 80% accuracy. . with at least 80% accuracy. the student will identify correct statements and safe methods.

Section 1 Introduction Accident/Injury Problem .

. Introduction – Accident/Injury Problem (continued) Section 1 Material Handling Injuries Manual material handling injuries account for about 35% of all mining injuries at surface locations.

or shoveling.S. pulling. NOTE: For the purposes of this course. pushing. Mining Industry During the Eight-Year Period 1998 .2005 MSHA Definition (for Accident Classification purposes) Handling Material – Accidents related to handling packaged or loose material while lifting.” . Introduction – Accident/Injury Problem (continued) Section 1 Manual Material Handling Injuries In the U. we will refer to this type of accident or activity as “manual material handling.

000 75848 60.000 All Mining 120. mills. and plants. therefore.2005 Manual Material Handling Injuries All Other Injuries 140.000 Surface Locations (focus of this course) 100.000 39209 34% 26929 34% 27294 35% 35% 17845 0 All Injuries Lost-Workday Injuries All Injuries Lost-Workday Injuries NOTE: Source of data is MSHA’s BIQuery/Teradata system.000 80. as well as surface mines. Introduction – Accident/Injury Problem (continued) Section 1 Injuries During Eight-Year Period 1998 .000 52001 49867 40. Data includes reportable (degree 1 – 6) injuries for operators and contractors. includes surface areas of underground mines and office workers. . “Surface Locations” excludes only underground locations and. ”Other” includes all accident classifications other than manual material handling.000 32906 20.

Data includes reportable (degree 1 – 6) injuries for operators and contractors. ”Other” includes all accident classifications other than manual material handling.2005 • Manual Material Handling injuries were down 24% 12000 11631 All Injuries 10000 10804 10919 9840 8000 8988 8259 8236 8484 6000 Manual Material Handling Injuries 4000 3861 3683 3863 3641 3376 2000 3020 2927 2923 0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 NOTE: Source of data is MSHA’s BIQuery/Teradata system. as well as surface mines. “Surface Locations” excludes only underground locations and. . mills. and plants. therefore. Introduction – Accident/Injury Problem (continued) Section 1 Surface Locations Comparing 2005 to 1998: • All injuries were down 27% (focus of this course) • “Other” injuries were down 28% 1998 . includes surface areas of underground mines and office workers.

. • The number of manual material handling injuries decreased considerably over the eight-year period. but the decrease was somewhat less pronounced than the decrease in all injuries. • Manual material handling accidents consistently account for at least 1/3 of all mining accidents. Introduction Section 1 Conclusions Summary • Material handling is possibly the most serious workplace safety problem. • Fatalities caused by manual material handling are rare.

3. 5. Material handling is often considered to be the most serious safety problem in the nation. . Manual material handling injuries account for about 50% of all mining injuries at surface locations. While manual material handling accounts for many injuries. 2. these injuries are minor and rarely result in any lost work time. The subject of material handling can be divided into manual material handling and mechanical material handling. 4. The number of manual material handling injuries in mining has been increasing at surface locations. Introduction Section 1 Sample Quiz True or False? 1.

Section VII. and four out of five of these injuries will affect the lower back. Nation’s Number One Workplace Safety Problem Bureau of Labor Statistics -.Back Injuries. work force. . Illnesses.Back Disorders and Injuries Bureau of Labor Statistics – Lost-Worktime Injuries and Illnesses: Characteristics and Resulting Time Away From Work. Section 2 Manual Handling of Materials Lifting and Moving Material Manual materials handling is the principal source of compensable injuries in the U. They are for informational and educational purposes only.S. Chapter 1 -. 2004 OSHA Fact Sheet -.Injuries.1 Internet Links2 1OSHA Technical Manual. and Fatalities 2Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA.

Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Does this photo show the proper way to lift? What are some injuries that result Does this look better? from improper material handling? .

tendons. or carries objects • Poor physical condition -. Section VII. Back Disorders and Injuries 2Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. or the cumulative effect of several contributors: • Reaching while lifting • Poor posture -. Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Factors Associated with Back Disorders1 Slide 1 of 2 Back disorders result from exceeding the capability of the muscles. They are for informational and educational purposes only. pushes. or discs. .staying in one position for too long • Bad body mechanics -.how one sits or stands • Stressful living and working activities -.losing the strength and endurance to perform physical tasks without strain • Poor design of job or work station • Repetitive lifting of awkward items or equipment (continued on next slide) Internet Link2 1OSHA Technical Manual. pulls. Chapter 1.how one lifts.

such as with lift truck drivers Internet Link2 1OSHA Technical Manual. . or constrained posture • Lifting with forceful movement • Vibration. Back Disorders and Injuries 2Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. Chapter 1. Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Factors Associated with Back Disorders1 (continued) Slide 2 of 2 • Twisting while lifting • Bending while lifting • Maintaining bent postures • Heavy lifting • Fatigue • Poor footing such as slippery floors. Section VII. They are for informational and educational purposes only.

. Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Manual Handling Seek help: • When a load is too bulky to properly grasp or lift • When you can’t see around or over the load • When you can’t safely handle the load Attach handles or holders to loads to reduce the chances of getting fingers smashed.

lift gates. wheels. come-alongs.Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Safe Lifting • Can engineering solutions be used to eliminate the lift or reduce the hazard? • Break load into parts. handles. chain falls. keep back straight. overhead hoists. shoulder pads. • Use handling aids . wheelbarrows. & similar devices. . hydraulic jacks. • Lift with legs. trestles.such as steps. • Get help with heavy or bulky items. • Avoid lifting above shoulder level. do not twist.

Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Safe Lifting Training What should be taught: • How to lift safely • How to avoid unnecessary physical stress and strain • What you can comfortably handle without undue strain • Proper use of equipment • Recognizing potential hazards and how to prevent/correct them .

M/NM Policy . Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Gloves & Footwear • For loads with sharp or rough edges. [see linked items (c) & (e)] • When loads are heavy or bulky. wear steel-toed safety shoes to prevent foot injuries if the load is M/NM Regulation . wear gloves or other hand and forearm Coal Regulation – Gloves & Footwear protection.Footwear dropped. .Footwear • Metatarsal protection adds an extra measure of safety.

Coal Policy – Hard Hats NOTE: A variety of other PPE is needed for other hazards at mining operations.Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Personal Protective Equipment Hard Hats • Hard hats need to be worn where falling objects may create a M/NM Regulation – Hard Hats hazard. Coal Regulation – Hard Hats [see linked item (d)] • This includes hazards Coal Regulation – Hard Hats from material stored or for Inexperienced Miners handled overhead. .

Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Loading. and Unloading Parts & Supplies • Load/stack secured. not too high • Proper lifting • Human or mechanical help • Pinched hand/finger hazard • Personal protective equipment • Tripping hazards/footing . Transporting.

30 CFR § 56. .4102 Spillage and leakage. 30 CFR § 77.20003 Housekeeping. 30 CFR § 56.205 Travelways at surface installations. 30 CFR § 56. Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Housekeeping How does good housekeeping improve safety? How does it reduce material handling hazards? Internet Links MSHA Compliance Tips Page on Housekeeping 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 77.11001 Safe access.1104 Accumulations of combustible materials.16001 Stacking and storage of materials.208 Storage of materials. 30 CFR § 77.

30 CFR § 77.12014 Handling energized power cables. 30 CFR § 77. . handling.606-1 Rubber gloves.Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Moving Trailing Cables • Protective rubber gloves • Protective devices • Examine cable before handling • Human and/or mechanical help • Tripping/slipping hazards • Loose material hazards Internet Links 30 CFR § 56.606 Energized trailing cables. minimum requirements.

& slippery surfaces • Slips. trips. bruises. Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Summary of Hazards Persons responsible for material handling are subject to several types of hazards and injuries including: • Struck by materials • Caught in pinch points • Fractures. & crushing injuries • Back injuries • Stuck or frozen objects/parts • Heavy & sometimes awkward loads • Dropped material • Uneven. & falls • Truck loading & unloading hazards • Restricted vision – equipment operators • Falls of rock or ore . cluttered.

Manual Handling of Materials – Lifting and Moving Material (continued) Section 2 Ergonomics .

or moving objects? • Are there slip/trip hazards? Implement Plan • Are others clear? Review & Revise • Am I clear of others? (continued on next slide) . Manual Handling of Materials – Risk Assessment Section 2 Think Ask Assess the Risk Check Slide 1 of 3 Ask Yourself Questions Like – What can go wrong? • How much does it weigh? • How much can I safely lift? • Can I get a secure grip? • Can I pinch my fingers? • Can I be struck by loose. Plan falling.

Manual Handling of Materials – Risk Assessment (continued) Section 2 Think Ask Assess the Risk (continued) Slide 2 of 3 Check Plan Ask Yourself Questions Like – • What is the best way to do this job? • Do I need help? • What tools or equipment do I need? • Do I need mechanical aids? • Do I have proper personal protective equipment? • Do I have a clear path? Plan • How am I going to secure parts/objects? • How can I safely lower/raise parts/objects? Implement Plan • How can I communicate/coordinate work efforts? (continued on Review & Revise next slide) .

correct? Plan •Are material handling jobs evaluated? •Are errors. mistakes. coach. & weaknesses Implement Plan corrected? Review & Revise . Manual Handling of Materials – Risk Assessment (continued) Section 2 Think Ask Assess the Risk (continued) Slide 3 of 3 Check Implement / Revise Ask Yourself Questions Like – •What instructions do I need? •What information/skills are needed? •Do I have required skills & training? •Do supervisors check.

Assess the risk. Can you identify the hazards and safer ways of doing the jobs? For example: Changing Conveyor Rollers Handling Guards During Maintenance Work . Manual Handling of Materials – Additional Discussion Topics Section 2 Consider common lifting and moving activities at your operation.

Manual Handling of Materials – Additional Discussion Topics (continued) Section 2 Consider common lifting and moving activities at your operation. Can you identify the hazards and safer ways of doing the jobs? For example: Handling Cylinders & Drums . Assess the risk.

Assess the risk. Manual Handling of Materials – Additional Discussion Topics (continued) Section 2 Consider common lifting and moving activities at your operation. Can you identify the hazards and safer ways of doing the jobs? For example: Rope & Hose Handling Cable Handling .

Manual Handling of Materials – Additional Discussion Topics (continued) Section 2 Consider common lifting and moving activities at your operation. Assess the risk. Can you identify the hazards and safer ways of doing the jobs? For example: Handling Quality Control Samples Changing & Lifting Screens .

Can you identify the hazards and safer ways of doing the jobs? For example: Handling Used Oil . Assess the risk. Manual Handling of Materials – Additional Discussion Topics (continued) Section 2 Consider common lifting and moving activities at your operation.

Section 2 Manual Handling of Materials Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery .

They are for informational and educational purposes only. .Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Common Types of Back Injuries • Muscle Strain or Spasm • Ruptured or Herniated Discs Low back pain can have many other causes… follow the link: Low Back Pain – WebMD.com NOTE: Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA.

• Store heavy and frequently used items at waist height. They are for informational and educational purposes only. instead of pull. and stretch occasionally. • Push. . or lower an object. • Minimize bending and twisting.com – Preventing Injuries at Work 3Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. (continued on next slide) Internet Links3 1SpineUniverse. • Change positions. hold.2 Slide 1 of 2 • Maintain proper posture. walk. • Avoid reaching out over an obstruction to lift.com – Use Good Body Mechanics to Help Keep Your Spine Safe 2SpineUniverse. Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Good Body Mechanics1.

– Get in a stable position with feet wide apart. carrying. – Face the object and get close to it. and keep good posture. – Repeat the same movements for setting the object down. – Test the weight. They are for informational and educational purposes only. keep back straight. – Do not bend and twist simultaneously. – Plan your route. – Bend knees. Internet Links3 1SpineUniverse.com – Use Good Body Mechanics to Help Keep Your Spine Safe 2SpineUniverse. . – Use leg muscles for lifting power. and reaching. – Tighten your stomach. not the back.2 (continued) Slide 2 of 2 • Plan for lifting. Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Good Body Mechanics1. clear obstacles. – Determine best way to hold the object. lift smoothly. but don’t hold your breath.com – Preventing Injuries at Work 3Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA.

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 More Tips for a Healthy Back and Exercises for Back Care • Good body mechanics and exercise can be crucial to back injury prevention. • Physical conditioning and stretching programs reduce the risk of muscle strain. . and in the treatment of. and could even be harmful in some cases. back injuries. and recovery from. • Follow the exercise routine prescribed by your doctor. • Your best back support is derived from your own back muscles. These tips and exercises are not suitable in all cases. NOTE: This link takes you to a later slide in the presentation. You will have to return to this slide manually. See “More Back Links” for Sources and for Additional Information. There are several possible sources of low back pain.

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Standing and Walking • Toes straight • Weight on heels • Chest forward • Stand tall Correct Incorrect Correct Incorrect .

and shoulders erect • Don’t slouch . head. Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Sitting • All the way back Correct Incorrect • Back.

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Driving • Seat support • Close to wheel • Knees bent and higher than hips • Stop and walk Correct Incorrect .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Lifting • Test weight Correct Incorrect • Plan route • Wide stance • Bend knees • Get close • Best hold • Stable position • Tighten stomach • Use legs • Keep back straight • Lift smoothly Avoid or minimize: • Bending and twisting • Reaching out with weight .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back More About Lifting Correct • Elevated storage Incorrect • Practice • Warm-up • Breaks • Communication .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Lifting Light-Weight Items or Balance trunk by extending leg. Hold onto a firm object. .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Reaching Overhead • Wide base of support • Safe platform or step not stool .

. Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Tripod Lift1 (an alternative for lifting bagged material) • Slide bag to mid-thigh • Less arm strength required • Lift onto opposite thigh • Not for those with bad knees • “Hug” bag to stomach and chest • Lift by extending your legs Internet Link2 1Lifting Techniques – U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine 2Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. They are for informational and educational purposes only.

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Shoveling • Wide base of support • Knees bent • Back straight • Choke down on shovel • Lift with legs • Pivot instead of twisting .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Working .Standing • Avoid long standing if possible • Prop up a foot occasionally • Lean on something occasionally • Avoid bending forward Correct Incorrect Working .Stooping • Avoid if possible • Bend backwards regularly .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Using a Push-Broom • Walk back and forth • Handle against hip-bone • Elbow bent • Handle length .

with acute back pain .Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Tips for a Healthy Back Sleeping Correct Incorrect Correct.

. Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Flexion Exercises General Comment The flexion exercises are often recommended for alleviating and preventing painful muscle spasms in the low back. Muscles tighten and stay in spasm if they are not allowed to stretch. Stay as active as possible.

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Exercises for Back Care Flexion Pelvic Tilt .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Exercises for Back Care Flexion Cross-Arm Knee Pushing The Curl .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Exercises for Back Care Flexion Knee Raising .Single Knee Raising .Double .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Exercises for Back Care Flexion Head Raising Leg Raising .

. Repeat these exercises at two hour intervals. Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Extension Exercises General Comment The following extension exercises are often helpful in alleviating discogenic pain. six to eight times per day.

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2 Exercises for Back Care Extension Extension Exercise 1 Extension Exercise 2 .

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2

Exercises for Back Care
Extension

Extension Exercise 3 Extension Exercise 4

(a) (a)
(b)

(b)

Manual Handling of Materials: Low-Back Injuries – Prevention and Recovery (continued) Section 2

More Back Links1
• Back Pain Exercises – American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
• How to Prevent Back Pain – American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
• Low Back Exercise Guide – American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
• Preventing Back Pain at Work and at Home – American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
• PowerLift® – EmployerHealth.com
• PowerLift® – Michigan Technological University
• PowerLift® – South Central Technical College
• Lifting Techniques – U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine
• Getting to Grips with Manual Handling – Health and Safety Executive (United Kingdom)
• Correct Lifting Techniques – Ergoboy.com
• Exercises to Reduce Low Back Pain – WebMD
• Exercises to Relieve Low Back Pain – Aetna InteliHealth
• Manual Handling of Materials – MSHA; Sand, Gravel, and Crushed Stone On-The-Job Training Modules
• "Watch Your Back" - Prevent Back Injuries – MSHA Health Hazard Information
• Musculoskeletal Disorders and Workplace Factors – National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
• Low Back Exercise Program – Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma
• General Back Exercises – #1 Back Pain Site
• Lower Back Exercises – Beau Productions, Golf Swings Health Pages
• Common Causes of Back Pain – LowBackPain.com
• Non-Surgical Treatment – Exercise – LowBackPain.com
• Back Pain – About.com, Orthopedics
• Exercise for Back Pain – Spine-health.com
• Extend Yourself for Low-Back Pain Relief – The Physician and Sportsmedicine Online
• Low Back Disorders – Shasta Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine
• Summary of NIOSH Back Belt Studies - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
• Back Belts, Do They Prevent Injury? - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
• OSH Answers: Back Belts – Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
1Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. They are for informational and educational purposes only.

Manual Handling of Materials Section 2

Section Review
Summary

Some of the major key points of this section are
summarized below:

Manual Handling of Materials

• Lifting “do’s”– minimize heavy lifting, stay close, wide
stance, use legs
• Lifting “don’ts” – bending, twisting, jerking, reaching out
• Body mechanics – posture, change positions, lean/prop
foot on something
• Consider back exercises.

1. b. Get close and use a wide stance. Examine cable for damage. c. Wear protective rubber gloves and use nonconductive hooks or other 2. j. Lifting f. Manual Handling of Materials Section 2 Sample Quiz Select All That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a. Jerk the load up quickly. Obtain help (human or mechanical) for heavy objects. d. g. like slings attached to bulldozers. Quiz Continued on Next Slide . Use leg muscles for lifting. e. e. Reach out as far as possible to protect your trunk from the load. i. Straddle the cable. Store heaviest objects on the floor. Use mechanical help. and hold it close. Moving Trailing Cables protective devices. d. a. as necessary. c. b. Split heavy loads into smaller parts when you can. h. pick it up in both arms. Bend over with your knees straight and lift with the upper torso. Test the weight. Make sure area is free of tripping hazards. No PPE is required.

Shoveling further. Twist your trunk to throw material to the side. e. Start with legs apart. e. When sitting or driving take occasional breaks to walk around. Hold shovel as close as possible to end of handle so you can reach 3. a. Driving d. Don’t lean on anything when standing. Sit all the way back in a firm-back chair. Maintain good posture. b. c. Walking. Lift with your legs. b. knees bent. Standing. Sitting. Make sure you have solid footing. and back straight. Manual Handling of Materials Section 2 Sample Quiz (continued) Select All That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a. c. Always keep both feet flat on the floor when standing. Quiz Continued on Next Slide . d. 4.

e. d. Doing Back Exercises c. Extension exercises are often helpful in alleviating disc-related pain. Manual Handling of Materials Section 2 Sample Quiz (continued) Select All That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a. d. . b. Follow the exercise routine prescribed by your doctor. The “tripod lift” is not recommended for persons with bad knees. Always get complete bed rest until you have been pain-free for at least a week. Use the pelvic tilt to start many of the back exercises. 5. The “tripod lift” starts with one knee on the floor/ground. 6. The “tripod lift” requires increased arm strength. Only the “tripod lift” should be used for bagged material. b. Flexion exercises are often recommended to alleviate and prevent muscle spasms. e. Handling Bagged Material c. a. Normal lifting techniques can be used for bagged material.

Section 3 .

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts Section 3 Forklifts • Center the load on the forks and as close to the mast as possible to Internet Links minimize the potential for the truck 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 56.16016 • Overloading a lift truck makes it Lift trucks.1607 over. Securing movable parts. Loading and haulage equipment. • Don’t place extra weight on the rear of a counterbalanced forklift to allow an overload. hard to control and could make it tip 30 CFR § 77.14206 tipping or load falling. . • Place the load at the lowest position [see subsection (s)] for traveling. operation.

Surface M/NM Standards – 30 CFR § 56. • Appendix A -. Surface Coal Standards – 30 CFR § 77. falling object protective structures (FOPS). Surface Coal Standards – 30 CFR § 77. some forklift-specific standards are contained in the links1 below: • MSHA.410 Mobile equipment. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Forklift Standards Forklifts are considered to be powered haulage equipment under MSHA standards. • ITSDF Industrial Truck Standards 1NOTE: Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. . General Industry Standards – 29 CFR § 1910. • MSHA. They are for informational and educational purposes only. Construction Standards – 29 CFR § 1926.Stability of Powered Industrial Trucks (Non-mandatory Appendix to Paragraph (l) of § 1910.403 Mobile equipment.178 • OSHA. and MSHA training standards apply to forklift operators.602 Material handling equipment. • MSHA.16016 Lift trucks. As such there are a number of safety standards that apply.178 Powered industrial trucks. Beyond the general rules and safe practices applicable to various types of equipment. • OSHA. automatic warning devices.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 General Information .

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Platform Lift Truck .

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Motorized Hand Truck (Pallet Jack) .

. They are for informational and educational purposes only. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Design & Construction Internet Links1 ITSDF Industrial Truck Standards 1Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 • Capacity • Power Sources • Hazardous Atmospheres .

14106 Falling object protection. 30 CFR § 77. [see subsection (b) re. falling object protective structures (FOPS). forklifts] . Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Overhead Protection Internet Links 30 CFR § 56.403 Mobile equipment.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 • Lights • Internal Combustion Engines • Battery Chargers .

(more on next slide) . • Keep speed low .you may have to stop. • Don’t drive with forks raised. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Operating a Forklift Safely • Keep arms and legs inside the truck. • Be careful when making sharp turns with a raised load. travel in reverse. unless there’s an approved seat. • No riders. • Handle only stable loads. • Wear safety belts or other restraint devices. • If a load blocks your view.

set brake. • Trucks must be inspected prior to each shift. • Drivers must slow down and sound the horn at cross aisles and blind spots. • Fuel tanks shall not be filled while the engine is running. and take keys. • No one should stand under the elevated portion of the truck. • When ascending or descending grades in excess of 10%. lower forks. loaded trucks must be driven with the load upgrade. • Cross railroad tracks diagonally. . • When unattended. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Operating a Forklift Safely (continued) • All traffic rules must be observed. • Damaged or defective trucks must be removed from service immediately.

30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 56. [see subsection (c)] . 30 CFR § 77. 30 CFR § 77.9101 Operating speeds and control of equipment. operation.205 Travelways at surface installations.9313 Roadway maintenance. 30 CFR § 56.11001 Safe access. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 • Sufficient safe clearances • Surface conditions Internet Links 30 CFR § 56.20003 Housekeeping.1607 Loading and haulage equipment.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Pedestrians .

1Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. .30(a) Dockboards (bridge plates). Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Dockboards (Bridge Plates) • Use • Strength • Secure • Placement • Handholds Internet Link1 OSHA Standard – 29 CFR § 1910. They are for informational and educational purposes only.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 What is this worker doing and why? .

.Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Prevent accidents. • Chock wheels. • Wear seat belt.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3

Trailers

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3

Securing Trucks/Trailers Prior to Loading/Unloading with Forklifts
Summary of Hazards and Minimum Precautions
Hazards
• Creep
• Pull Away

Trailer Remains Coupled to Truck
• Truck Brakes Set AND
• Rear Wheels Chocked OR Trailer Effectively
Secured to Dock (dock lock system)
• Trailer Floor Inspected

Trailer is Uncoupled from Truck
• Trailer Brakes Set (if equipped) AND
• Rear Wheels Chocked OR Trailer Effectively
Secured to Dock (dock lock system)
• Jacks Supporting Semitrailer as Necessary
• Trailer Floor Inspected
Internet Link1

OSHA Standard Interpretation – 29 CFR § 1910.178(k)(1), § 1910.178(m)(7), & § 1910.178(l)
1Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. They are for informational and educational purposes only.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3

Railroad Cars
Wheel Stops

sand. and surface limestone mines . colloidal phosphate. 2For surface mines and surface areas of underground mines 3For shell dredging. gravel. surface clay. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Powered Industrial Truck Training • Health & safety aspects • Safe work procedures • Pertinent regulations • Observation/supervision by a competent person Internet Links1 MSHA – Part 48 Task Training Requirements2 MSHA – Part 46 Task Training Requirements3 OSHA – Powered Industrial Trucks . surface stone.] 1Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA.Training Materials OSHA – Powered Industrial Trucks – Training Requirements [Scroll all the way to section (l) after clicking this link. They are for informational and educational purposes only.

inspection. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Lift Truck Training should include Truck Related Topics such as: • Operating instructions. & use limits • Vehicle capacity. stability. & precautions • Truck controls & instrumentation • Engine or motor operation • Steering & maneuvering • Visibility • Fork & attachment adaptation. & maintenance • Refueling and/or battery charging/recharging . warnings. operation.

& unstacking • Pedestrian traffic • Narrow aisles. closed. or unique locations/environments . stacking. & other restricted or sloped places • Potentially hazardous. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Lift Truck Training should include Workplace Related Topics such as: • Surface conditions where the vehicle will be used • Composition of loads & load stability • Load manipulation. ramps.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Lift Truck Training Consider/conduct Retraining and Reevaluation when: • The operator has been observed operating vehicle in an unsafe manner • The operator has been involved in an accident or close call • The operator has received an evaluation that reveals unsafe operation • The operator is assigned to a different type of truck • Conditions in the workplace change .

restrictions. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Internet Links 30 CFR § 56.405 Performing work from a raised position. 30 CFR § 77. safeguards. [see subparts (d) & (g)] . 30 CFR § 77.15005 Equipment Safety belts and lines.9200 • Unauthorized Transporting persons.1601 Transportation of persons.15002 • Personal Hard hats. 30 CFR § 77. Protective 30 CFR § 56. Lifting 30 CFR § 56. requirements.14211 • Inappropriate Blocking equipment in a raised position.1710 Protective clothing. Personnel 30 CFR § 56.

30 CFR § 77.1106 Battery-charging stations.16006 Protection of gas cylinder valves. smoking and open flame.4103 Fueling internal combustion engines. 30 CFR § 77. 30 CFR § 56. fueling. 30 CFR § 56.208 Storage of materials.4100 Smoking and use of open flames. 30 CFR § 56.1102 Warning signs. 30 CFR § 77.4102 Spillage and leakage.4101 Warning signs.1109 Quantity and location of firefighting equipment. [see subsections (b) & (c)] 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 77. equipment.9313 Roadway maintenance. ventilation. 30 CFR § 77. 30 CFR § 56.1105 Internal combustion engines. operation. [see especially subsections (c)(1) & (e)] .4230 Self-propelled equipment.4502 Battery-charging stations.9101 Operating speeds and control of 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 56. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 Additional Considerations Fire Precautions Surface Conditions Internet Links Internet Links 30 CFR § 56.16005 Securing gas cylinders.1607 Loading and haulage equipment. 30 CFR § 77.

Safety & Health Topics: Powered Industrial Trucks • Free-Training.. Occupational Safety & Health Bureau – Forklift Safety Guide • Radford University. Safety Ideas – Rough Terrain Forklift Safety • Pacific Employers – Safely Loading. Written Safety Plan – Forklift Operation Plan • Naval Safety Center – Loading Docks – Danger Zones for Workers • Department of Interior.Forklifts • Texas Woman's University. Forklift Safety • Montana Department of Labor & Industry. Occupational Health & Medical Services Page – Forklift Safety • MSHA. . They are for informational and educational purposes only.com – Forklift Operation & Safety Course • LSU CAMD – Forklift Safety • Department of Agriculture. Forest Service – Job Hazard Analysis . Trucks & Trailers • Government of Saskatchewan – Safe Operation of Forklifts • Pacific Maritime Association – Safety Tips for Power Industrial Truck Operators • Rite-Hite Holding Corporation – Securing Trucks with the Right Restraint 1NOTE: These links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. or Unloading. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Forklifts (continued) Section 3 More Forklift Links1 Some forklift-specific links are provided below: • OSHA. Inc. Environmental Health & Safety – Powered Industrial Trucks • Montex.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Hoists Hoists Section 3 Internet Link MSHA IG 40 Module 15 – Using an Overhead Hoist to Handle Material .

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Hoists (continued) Section 3 Hoists (General) • Capacity marked • Attachment to supports • Adequate supports • Persons operating • Inspection • Limiting devices • Proper lifting procedure • No riders .

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Hoists (continued) Section 3 Electric Hoist • Control cords • Distinct contours & marking • Inspection • Automatic “off” • Control circuit voltage • Limit stop • Remaining rope on drum .

30 CFR § 77. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Hoists (continued) Section 3 Air Hoist • Sufficient air supply • Positive hose connections Gearing • Upper & lower limits Inlet Air Swivel • Positive hook attachment to support • Piston secured to rod (check when overhauled) Brake Vane Motor Speed Adjustment Limit Lever Screws Internet Links 30 CFR § 56.13021 High-pressure hose connections.13021 High-pressure hose connections. Policy on 56. .412 Compressed air systems.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Hoists (continued) Section 3 Hand-Operated Chain Hoist • Strong/dependable/durable • Types – Spur-geared [most efficient] [auto load brake] – Differential [least efficient] [self locking] – Screw-geared (worm-drive) [self locking] • Load safety factor • Supports sufficiently strong • Safe lifting/handling procedures .

MSHA IG 40 Module 15 – Using an Overhead Hoist to Handle Material 29 CFR § 1926. and 12. personnel hoists.] 1Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA. 30 CFR § 56.5. Michigan Safe Work Requirements [This is a large document.16011 Riding hoisted loads or on the hoist hook.9. 30 CFR § 77. 30 CFR § 77.5. 12.210 Hoisting of materials. certified person. 29 CFR § 1926. 30 CFR § 77.14205 Machinery. OSHA Standard Interpretations. and elevators.1.16007 Taglines. 30 CFR § 56. Find Sections 12. § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 30 CFR § 56. 12.5.5.1. operation and maintenance. 29 CFR § 1926. 30 CFR § 56.1713 Daily inspection of surface coal mine.4. 30 CFR Part 56 Subpart R – Personnel Hoisting. 08/04/2000 .553 Base-mounted drum hoists. 30 CFR § 56.6. 30 CFR § 56.554 Overhead hoists.9.552 Material hoists.5.Alloy steel chain slings must not be loaded beyond working load limit. and tools.19000 Application. equipment. . reports of inspection. They are for informational and educational purposes only.5.16009 Suspended loads. hitches. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Hoists (continued) Section 3 Other Hoist-Related Links1 30 CFR § 56.404 Machinery and equipment.1 only.3. 12.16015 Work or travel on overhead crane bridges.5.18002 Examination of working places. and slings.

Mechanical Handling of Materials Section 3

Dollies (Hand Trucks) and Carts
Nonpowered Hand Powered Hand
Trucks & Carts Trucks & Carts

• Get Help • Training
• Heavy Objects on Bottom • Manufacturer’s Manual
• Load over Axles • Heavy Objects on Bottom
• Not above Eye Level • Face Travel Direction
• Secure to Truck • Hand on Handle
• Firm Grip • Handle-Release Shut-Off
• Back Straight • Traffic Rules
• Lean & Walk • Stop & Look
• Push Forward • Watch for:
• Watch for: • Obstructions
• Obstructions • Vehicles
• Vehicles • People
• People • Ground/Floor
• Ground/Floor • Tight Spaces
• Moving Parts
• No Riders
• Parking

Mechanical Handling of Materials Section 3

Jacks, “Porta-Powers,” “Come-Alongs,” Etc.

Internet Links1

30 CFR § 56.14100 Safety defects; examination, correction and records.
[See subsections (b) & (c)]

30 CFR § 77.404 Machinery and equipment; operation and maintenance.

29 CFR § 1910.244 Other portable tools and equipment. [Jacks]

29 CFR § 1915.114 Chain falls and pull-lifts.

1Non-MSHA links are not meant to imply enforceability by MSHA.
They are for informational and educational purposes only.

Mechanical Handling of Materials – Risk Assessment Section 3

Think
Ask Assess the Risk
Check Slide 1 of 3

Ask Yourself Questions Like –

What can go wrong?

• How much does it weigh?
• How much can the equipment handle?
• Are there suspended load hazards?
• Can the equipment upset?
• Can an object fall on me?
• Can I be pinned or crushed?
• Are there slip/trip hazards?
Plan • Are others clear?
• Am I clear of others?
• Have I secured the area?
Implement Plan • Have I secured or blocked parts that
could slip or move? (continued on
Review & Revise • Can I contact electrical wires? next slide)

including safety equipment? • Do I need to adjust the equipment? • Do I have proper personal protective equipment? • Do I have a clear aisle/passageway? • How am I going to secure parts/objects? Plan • How can I safely handle parts/objects? • Have I secured trailer or rail car? • Have I inspected trailer or rail car for safe entry? Implement Plan • How can I communicate/coordinate work? (continued on Review & Revise next slide) . Mechanical Handling of Materials – Risk Assessment (continued) Section 3 Think Ask Assess the Risk (continued) Slide 2 of 3 Check Plan Ask Yourself Questions Like – • What is the best way to do this job? • What tools or equipment do I need? • Is the equipment operating correctly.

& weaknesses corrected? Review & Revise . coach. and correct? Plan •Are material handling jobs assessed for risk? Implement Plan •Are errors. training. skills. Mechanical Handling of Materials – Risk Assessment (continued) Section 3 Think Ask Assess the Risk (continued) Slide 3 of 3 Check Implement / Revise Ask Yourself Questions Like – •What instructions do I need? •Do I have the necessary information. mistakes. and experience? •Do supervisors check.

• Maintain safety equipment. if defective. trailer floor & “nose” secure. Mechanical Handling of Materials Section 3 Section Review Summary Some of the major key points of this section are summarized below: Mechanical Handling of Materials • Forklifts – inspect each shift. no unauthorized modifications. . • Inspect hoists frequently & thoroughly. speed slow. • Forklifts – load low. • Docks – brakes set. chocks &/or dock locks. & abide by load limits. dock plate. load uphill on grades. • Watch for struck-by/crushed-by dangers. remove from service.

4. Mechanical alternatives to manual handling of materials should be used whenever possible to minimize lifting and bending requirements. Lift truck (forklift) training should include both truck related topics and workplace related topics. If rear forklift wheels come off the ground when you try to lift a load. 3. Mechanical Handling of Materials Section 3 Sample Quiz True or False? 1. “Come-alongs” can be used interchangeably with hoists. 2. always add weights to the rear. Quiz Continued on Next Slide .

Raise forks until you can see under it. a. a. When transporting loads with a forklift. Two feet d. Setting the truck brakes. Eight feet Quiz Continued on Next Slide . 6. Using a dockboard. a. If using a forklift to transport a load up a 12% grade. Uphill. 5. if a load blocks your view you should b. the b. d. Not carry it. Travel in reverse. Inspecting the trailer floor. c. Using wheel chocks. accepted in place of c. Mechanical Handling of Materials Section 3 Sample Quiz (continued) Select the Most Correct Method or Statement to Complete Each Item a. Downhill. At a loading dock. On a forklift. c. load should be c. Eight inches load more than about ___________ from the ground. try not to raise the b. an effective dock-lock system can be b. 7. Two inches 8. Not carried at all.

Mechanical Handling of Materials Section 3 Sample Quiz (continued) Select ALL Correct Methods or Statements to Complete Each Item a. Lift trucks should have the b. Seat belts e. . Don’t pile items above eye level.) e. awkward. g. Have specialized person inspect. Select ways to eliminate hazards handle the normal loads.) d. Brakes d. Train employees in inspection. Intentionally overload hoists occasionally to be sure they can 11. Overhead protection following safety equipment: (Select all that apply. for using nonpowered hand trucks b. (Select d. proper use. Recommended safe procedures a. as required. Always pull. don’t push. Place heavy objects on bottom of load. b. Air conditioned cab 9. & carts include: (Select all that c. hoists to handle materials. Abide by load limits. and operation. or delicate objects to the truck. Air bags 10. f. Leave loads hanging to provide a clear walkway underneath. all that apply. Secure bulky.) c. Inspect frequently. a. apply. Never lift people. that may lead to injury when using c.

Section 4 Stacking and Storage .

• Post safe load limits of floors.16001 Stacking and storage of materials.20003 Housekeeping.208 Storage of materials. or interlocking to prevent sliding or collapse. 30 CFR § 77. • Keep aisles and passageways clear. blocking. Stacking and Storage (continued) Section 4 Storing Materials • Secure materials stored in tiers by stacking. 30 CFR § 56. Internet Links 30 CFR § 56. racking. .

30 CFR § 77. 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 56.1710 Protective clothing.16003 Storage of hazardous materials. 30 CFR § 77. silos.1103 Flammable liquids. Stacking and Storage (continued) Section 4 Storing Materials • Smoking & Open Flames. & Tanks Internet Links 30 CFR Part 47 — Hazard Communication (HazCom) 30 CFR § 56.16002 Bins.15005 Safety belts and lines. 30 CFR § 77.208 Storage of materials. 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 56. tanks. and surge piles.4531 Flammable or combustible liquid storage buildings or rooms. Hoppers. storage. Silos. hoppers. 30 CFR § 56.16004 Containers for hazardous materials. smoking and open flame. 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 56.1102 Warning signs. requirements.4100 Smoking and use of open flames.4101 Warning signs.1104 Accumulations of combustible materials.4104 Combustible waste. 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 77. Warning Signs • Rooms or Buildings • Containers • Bins. [see subpart (g)] .16012 Storage of incompatible substances. 30 CFR § 77.

Stacking and Storage (continued) Section 4 Injuries from Falling Materials .

Stacking and Storage (continued) Section 4 Pallet Loads Is this pallet load secure and stable? What is likely to happen when it is moved with a lift truck? .

taper back one-half block for each tier above the six-foot level. 30 CFR § 77. – Do not stack them more than seven feet high. . • If masonry blocks are stacked higher than six feet. Internet Links 30 CFR § 56.208 Storage of materials.16001 Stacking and storage of materials. Stacking and Storage (continued) Section 4 Brick & Block Storage • Stack bricks in a manner that will keep them from falling. – Taper back a loose brick stack after it is four feet high.

• Stack on sills. • Stack lumber so that it is stable and self supporting. 30 CFR § 77.16001 Stacking and storage of materials. . Stacking and Storage (continued) Section 4 Lumber • Remove nails before stacking. Internet Links 30 CFR § 56.208 Storage of materials.

Stacking and Storage (continued) Section 4 .

Stacking and Storage (continued) Section 4 .

• A safer alternative is to lower material with a crane. .203 Use of material or equipment overhead. Stacking and Storage (continued) Section 4 Disposal of Waste Materials • Rope off or barricade and post the area below if material is dropped.20011 Barricades and warning signs. safeguards. 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 56. 30 CFR § 77.11012 Protection for openings around travelways. 30 CFR § 77. or through a chute as shown here. safeguards.204 Openings in surface installations. Internet Links 30 CFR § 56.16010 Dropping materials from overhead.

passageways. & work areas clear • Store/stack materials safely to avoid struck-by/crushed-by/fire hazards. Stacking and Storage Section 4 Section Review Summary Some of the major key points of this section are summarized below: Stacking and Storage • Good housekeeping – keep aisles. .

Only plastic containers can be used. Methods to reduce hazards associated with e. e. Stacking and Storage Section 4 Sample Quiz Select All That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a. Secure loads 1. Shrink wrapping h.) d. Removing nails before stacking lumber (Select all that apply. b. 2. Never store inside. Always storing drums on their side a.) g. Wider layers near top c. Prohibit smoking in the area. Removing items from bottom first d. The National Fire Protection Association is a good source of information. Which items should apply to storage of c. Interlocked packages stacked or tiered materials include: f. Separate from other material. flammable liquids? (Select all that apply. Limited heights b. Quiz Continued on Next Slide . Stacking combustible material as close as possible to overhead sprinklers i.

Use an enclosed chute when you drop material more than twenty feet outside of a building.) c. (Select all that apply. Stacking and Storage Section 4 Sample Quiz (continued) Select All That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a. . 3. enclose the drop area with materials? barricades. When debris is dropped through holes in the floor practice for disposal of waste without chutes. Which items represent good b. Keep oily rags and solvent waste in open containers to allow ventilation.

no unauthorized modifications. use legs • Lifting “don’ts” – bending. if defective. & abide by load limits. . Conclusion Section 5 Summary Some of the major key points of the course are summarized below: Accident/Injury Problem • Material handling – possibly the most serious safety problem • Manual material handling injuries – 35% of injuries at surface mine/facility locations Manual Handling of Materials • Lifting “do’s”– minimize heavy lifting. lean/prop foot on something • Consider back exercises. remove from service • Watch for struck-by/crushed-by dangers. • Docks – brakes set. stay close. jerking. wide stance. twisting. reaching out • Body mechanics – posture. dock plate. Stacking and Storage • Good housekeeping – keep aisles. trailer floor & “nose” secure • Inspect hoists frequently & thoroughly. passageways. speed slow. Mechanical Handling of Materials • Forklifts – inspect each shift. change positions. chocks &/or dock locks. • Forklifts – load low. load uphill on grades • Maintain safety equipment. & work areas clear • Store/stack materials safely to avoid struck-by/crushed-by/fire hazards.

these injuries are minor and rarely result in any lost work time. Test Continued on Next Slide . 2. Manual material handling injuries account for about 50% of all mining injuries at surface locations. Material handling is often considered to be the most serious safety problem in the nation. 4. The subject of material handling can be divided into manual material handling and mechanical material handling. While manual material handling accounts for many injuries. The number of manual material handling injuries in mining has been increasing at surface locations. 5. 3. Section 5 Conclusion Sample Test True or False? 1.

g. d. i. Reach out as far as possible to protect your trunk from the load. Obtain help (human or mechanical) for heavy objects. Bend over with your knees straight and lift with the upper torso. d. b. c. Lifting f. Test Continued on Next Slide . Examine cable for damage. Wear protective rubber gloves and use nonconductive hooks or other 7. Use leg muscles for lifting. Use mechanical help. a. j. b. Make sure area is free of tripping hazards. Test the weight. 6. Conclusion Section 5 Sample Test (continued) Select All That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a. h. and hold it close. e. pick it up in both arms. Straddle the cable. Split heavy loads into smaller parts when you can. like slings attached to bulldozers. Jerk the load up quickly. No PPE is required. Moving Trailing Cables protective devices. Get close and use a wide stance. Store heaviest objects on the floor. as necessary. c. e.

and back straight. Start with legs apart. d. Walking. b. Twist your trunk to throw material to the side. Hold shovel as close as possible to end of handle so you can reach 8. Always keep both feet flat on the floor when standing. Sitting. Shoveling further. When sitting or driving take occasional breaks to walk around. 9. b. c. Sit all the way back in a firm-back chair. e. Test Continued on Next Slide . Make sure you have solid footing. Standing. Maintain good posture. Lift with your legs. Conclusion Section 5 Sample Test (continued) Select All That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a. Don’t lean on anything when standing. c. knees bent. Driving d. e. a.

Always get complete bed rest until you have been pain-free for at least a week. Normal lifting techniques can be used for bagged material. e. The “tripod lift” requires increased arm strength. Doing Back Exercises prevent muscle spasms. Test Continued on Next Slide . Conclusion Section 5 Sample Test (continued) Select All That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a. Only the “tripod lift” should be used for bagged material. Follow the exercise routine prescribed by your doctor. Use the pelvic tilt to start many of the back exercises. c. c. b. Extension exercises are often helpful in alleviating disc-related pain. b. d. 10. Handling Bagged Material d. a. The “tripod lift” starts with one knee on the floor/ground. Flexion exercises are often recommended to alleviate and 11. The “tripod lift” is not recommended for persons with bad knees. e.

Test Continued on Next Slide . 13. “Come-alongs” can be used interchangeably with hoists. Mechanical alternatives to manual handling of materials should be used whenever possible to minimize lifting and bending requirements. Lift truck (forklift) training should include both truck related topics and workplace related topics. If rear forklift wheels come off the ground when you try to lift a load. always add weights to the rear. 14. 15. Conclusion Section 5 Sample Test (continued) True or False? 12.

a. Travel in reverse. Eight feet Test Continued on Next Slide . Not carry it. c. Using wheel chocks. if a load blocks your view you should b. c. 17. If using a forklift to transport a load up a 12% grade. a. Setting the truck brakes. Using a dockboard. Two feet d. Conclusion Section 5 Sample Test (continued) Select the Most Correct Method or Statement to Complete Each Item a. an effective dock-lock system can be b. On a forklift. Downhill. Not carried at all. When transporting loads with a forklift. Uphill. At a loading dock. the b. load should be c. accepted in place of c. 18. Raise forks until you can see under it. Inspecting the trailer floor. Eight inches load more than about ___________ from the ground. 16. a. d. try not to raise the b. Two inches 19.

Never lift people. g. don’t push. Don’t pile items above eye level. Seat belts e. Abide by load limits. a. Overhead protection following safety equipment: c. Select ways to eliminate hazards handle the normal loads. Air bags 21. or delicate objects to the truck. Always pull. awkward. Inspect frequently. Lift trucks should have the b. Have specialized person inspect. Place heavy objects on bottom of load. f.) d. Test Continued on Next Slide . Air conditioned cab 20. Intentionally overload hoists occasionally to be sure they can 22. Train employees in inspection. Secure bulky.) d. Leave loads hanging to provide a clear walkway underneath. and operation. Recommended safe procedures a. (Select all that apply.) e. as required. d. Conclusion Section 5 Sample Test (continued) Select ALL Correct Methods or Statements to Complete Each Item a. using hoists to handle materials. b. for using nonpowered hand b. trucks & carts include: (Select all c. Brakes (Select all that apply. that may lead to injury when c. that apply. proper use.

Stacking combustible material as close as possible to overhead sprinklers i. b. Always storing drums on their side a. Prohibit smoking in the area. Test Continued on Next Slide . 24. Interlocked packages with stacked or tiered materials include: f. Shrink wrapping h. Removing nails before stacking lumber (Select all that apply. Methods to reduce hazards associated e.) e. Limited heights b.) g. Only plastic containers can be used. The National Fire Protection Association is a good source of information. Wider layers near top c. Never store inside. Which items should apply to storage of c. Removing items from bottom first d. flammable liquids? d. Conclusion Section 5 Sample Test (continued) Select ALL That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a. Separate from other material. Secure loads 23. (Select all that apply.

Keep oily rags and solvent waste in open containers to allow ventilation. When debris is dropped through holes in the floor demolition? without chutes. Which items represent good than twenty feet outside of a building. practice for disposal and b. (Select all that apply.) c. . enclose the drop area with barricades. Use an enclosed chute when you drop material more 25. Conclusion Section 5 Sample Test (continued) Select ALL That Represent Correct Methods or Statements a.