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Key Concept

Formative Assessment 1
Where
are we
Self or Peer Pre & Post
Assessment Sharing
going?
Lesson Deliberate Practice
Learning
3 Objective

Feedback
Examplers

Discussions Quick Scan Questioning

How do we
get there? 2 Where is each pupil now?
Formative assessment classroom culture

• Placing emphasis on the process of teaching and


learning, and actively involving pupils in that
process
• Building pupils’ skills for peer assessment and
self assessment
• Helping pupils to understand their own learning,
and develop appropriate strategies for “learning
to learn”
D1.S1.27
Formative Assessment techniques:
1. Quick Scans
• Traffic Lights
• No Hands Up
• Thumbs Up Thumbs Down
2. Effective Questioning
Types of questioning
a) The Ignoramus: Pretend to be stupid or ignorant to encourage explanation.
b) The Stingray: Give a shock to pupils’ traditional way of thinking in the same way a stingray
uses its sting.
c) The Gadfly: This involves asking lots of little questions intended to push thinking.
d) The Midwife: Ask questions that help give birth to ideas.
Formative Assessment techniques:
Teaching strategies for effective questioning

1. ‘No hands up’ and nominated questioning


(the teacher selects a pupil to answer)
1. Wait time and pose/pause/pounce/bounce
(basketball not ping pong!)
3. Distributing questions using lollypop sticks
4. Mini whiteboards
Benefits of formative assessment
Benefits for teachers:

• Planning, teaching, responding and intervention


become more in line with pupil learning.

• There is more emphasis on learning than performance.


Benefits for pupils:

 encouraged to think more explicitly about learning.


 owners of their own learning:
- setting their targets, monitoring and evaluating their own learning,
 becoming aware of their own strengths
 Motivation raised through active engagement
 Develop a ‘growth mindset’:
- pupils develop strategies to help themselves when they find
things difficult.
Discussion formats:
1. Cooperative learning: jigsawing

PIES
Discussion formats: communication regulator

1. Talking Chips-

‘Rules’ encourage everyone to participate and stop one


person from dominating the activity.
Rules help to focus the activity.

Denis!
Discussion formats: communication regulator

1. Hot Seat-

‘Rules’ encourage everyone to participate and stop one


person from dominating the activity.
Rules help to focus the activity.

Eleanor!
Feedback!

 “Two Stars & A Wish”

 “Two Medals & One Mission”


‘Medals and missions’ feedback

‘Medals and Missions’


(Petty, 2014) goals

medal
mission
medal

D3.S3.3
• Gallary Poster
Evidence • Postcards
of • Worksheets
learning
• Role Play
Day 2

CEFR Global Scale


The Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR)
C2 Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read […]

C1 Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognise implicit meaning […]

B2 Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including
technical discussions in his/her field of specialisation […]
B1 Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered
in work, school, leisure, etc. […]
A2 Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate
relevance […]
A1 Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the
satisfaction of needs of a concrete type […]
Pre Can understand short, very simple instructions, questions, statements and words provided
A1 that they are delivered slowly and clearly and […] D2.S1.5
Key Concept of CEFR
It is a way of describing language performance
at 6 levels
It covers 4 skills and the language elements
within these.
There are global descriptors and skills-specific
descriptors, which allow us to develop learning
standards for each level.
Content Standards are the broad area of
focus within each skill:
Primary: Listening / Speaking /Reading /
Writing / Language Arts
Pre-school: Listening & Speaking /
Reading* / Writing* [*Emergent skills]
Learning Standards are the more detailed
and observable skills within the area
defined by each Content Standard.
Look at the example Content and
Learning Standards (see handout
D2.S1.H3)
• Developing language for communication within the
four key skills, rather than grammar
specifically.
• ‘can do’ statements help formative assessment
practices.
• The curriculum framework helps teachers plan their
lessons because it shows the specific skills to
focus on.
Handout D2.S1.H4
Session 2:
Planning objective-focused lessons
and identifying success criteria (1)

S MA R T
H a n d o u t
D 2 . S 2 . H 3
SMART learning objectives

When using learning objectives (LOs) consider the following:


• Separate learning objectives from the context of learning
• Be aware of whether LOs are open or closed (this has
implications for your success criteria)
• Don’t always share LOs at the start of the lesson; it can
become an empty ritual

D2.S2.5
Success criteria

• Success criteria are specific and measurable


descriptions of what success looks like when
the learning objective (goal) is reached.
• These success criteria will then help the teacher
to give specific feedback to pupils.

D2.S2.6
Use product-focused & process-focused success criteria (SC)
Example:
Learning Standard:
2.1.2: Find out about and describe basic everyday routines
Learning objective:
To ask and answer questions to communicate detail of morning routine of a character
Product Success Criterion:
Pupils will have full information about the character’s morning routine
Process Success Criteria:
Pupils will form intelligible questions in third person present tense
Pupils will respond intelligibly to questions in third person present tense
Pupils will understand and produce appropriate vocabulary:
verbs relating to daily routines / times
WALT and WILF and some points to think about
The WALT and WILF acronyms are a good way to make learning objectives
and success criteria accessible to pupils.
• WALT stands for ‘We Are Learning To’ (the learning objective)
• WILT is ‘What I am Looking For’ (the success criteria)

Also think about…


• Devise success criteria (SC) with pupils not for pupils as much as possible
• Refer to SC during the lesson not just at the end
• Allow time for pupils to think about SC and take ownership of them
• Link SC to learning objectives (and to models of good work)
• Don’t have too many SC
• Think about the order – are some SC more important than others? Is
there a way of grouping them that is helpful?
D2.S2.9
Starters and plenaries

Work in small groups, listing on flip chart paper:

1. All the examples of starter activities used so far in the


sessions this week
2. All the examples of plenary activities used so far in the
sessions this week

Add your own ideas for activities to the lists.

D2.S2.10
Reviewing and developing formative assessment
techniques
Reviewing and developing formative assessment techniques to support
independent learning
to
support independent learning
Growth Mindset Questionaire

When you have finished, add up your score in the first three
questions. Then divide it by 3.
Fixed mindset

• Performance orientation
• Intelligence is static (doesn’t change)
• I must look clever!
• Avoids challenges
• Gives up easily
• Sees effort as pointless
• Ignores useful criticism
• Likely to reach a high point early and achieve less than full potential OR sees themselves
as below average (‘stupid’), and gives up
From: Clarke’s Outstanding Formative Assessment: Culture and Practice (2014, p. 13)
D3.S2.3
Growth mindset

• Learning orientation
• Intelligence is expandable
• I want to learn more!
• Embraces challenges
• Persists in the face of setbacks
• Sees effort as the way forward
• Learns from criticism
• Reaches ever higher levels of achievement
From: Clarke’s Outstanding Formative Assessment: Culture and Practice (2014, p. 13)
D3.S2.4
How to promote growth mindset

• In your groups, think of ways to support and promote


a growth mindset in pupils.
• Discuss and identify practical ideas that can be used in
the classroom.
• Be ready to share your ideas.

D3.S2.5
How to promote growth mindset

• Create a climate in which pupils feel safe and become willing


to take risks.
• Acknowledge ‘mistaken’ answers by finding something
positive.
• Use C3B4ME (i.e. See Three Before Me).
• Involve pupils in planning.
• Praise growth mindset: focus on praising effort by using key
phrases: ‘You mean you don’t know yet’; ‘Don’t say no —
have a go’; Well done! You’re learning to…’.

D3.S2.6
Self-assessment ideas

• Learning logs: These logs record a pupil’s responses to questions


about what went well in their learning and what could be even
better (Use several open-ended prompts so that a pupil can chose
two or three to respond to).
• Exit cards: These record a pupil’s responses to questions about
what went well in their learning and what could be even better.
The cards are usually completed as part of a plenary phase in a
lesson.

D3.S2.8
Peer assessment ideas
• Two stars and a wish: When a pupil gives feedback to another pupil on an aspect
of their learning, the feedback must take the form of two things that were good
(stars) and one area for improvement (wish).
• Peer assessment to improve answers: Pupils work individually on a task and then
in small groups they share their work. They then work together as a group to
generate the best possible answer. Groups share their collaborative results with
the rest of the class.
• Pupils design their own ‘spot tests’: Pupils work in groups preparing their own
short test to check learning. The tests can be swapped within the class and pupils
complete each other’s tests, returning them for marking to the group that
designed the test.

D3.S2.10
REMEMBER!

Banana Green Tourist Toy


Phone

Show how each of the random words above might link to today’s learning.
Be ready to explain the link.
Key Concept
Formative Assessment 1
Where
are we
Self or Peer Pre & Post
Assessment Sharing
going?
Lesson Deliberate Practice
Learning
3 Objective

Feedback
Examplers

Discussions Quick Scan Questioning

How do we
get there? 2 Where is each pupil now?