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PARENT PRESENTATION

ECE 497 Shukoria Hansen


LINCOLN Pre-k through 6th
grade
94 percent
free/reduced lunch
58 percent second
language learners
Student body:

ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL
93 percent 5 percent white 2 percent American
Hispanic Indian
Early Childhood(2-6 years) Middle Childhood (6-11 Years)
 According to Berk, L. E. (2013) During this  According to Berk, L.E. (2013) During this
time the body becomes longer and leaner. time, children master new responsibilities.
 Motor skills are refined.  Their athletic abilities improve.

 Children become more self-controlled and  They are willing to participate in organized
self-sufficient. games with rules.
 They have a more logical thought process
 Thought and language expand.
 Academic skills improve and advances in
 Children establish ties with peers.
understanding self, morality, and friendship.

DEVELOPMENTAL PERIOD
 Any childcare professional that works in the developmental
growth of children.
 According to (Mossler 2014), “We study child development
which attempts to find explanations for both the similarities
and the differences in feelings, thoughts, and behaviors that
occur in children between birth and the end of adolescence”.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT
PROFESSIONAL
 According to Turner and Welch(2012), “The manner in which parents interact
with and guide their children influences the child’s development in more ways
than are immediately visible.
 With this in mind, professionals must seek to understand the children within
the context of their families and communities”.

ENCOURAGE, SUPPORT, ENGAGE

This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-ND


 Bronfenbrenner theorized that development
was based on different environmental systems
such as , schools, churches, recreational
leagues.
 His ecological systems theory involves the
mesosystem. The mesosystem (parental
involvement for the child) describes the
interactions between the microsystem (
parents, peers, neighborhood).

BRONFENBRENNER
ECOLOGICAL
SYSTEM THEORY
TYPE 1 PARENTING TYPE 2 TYPE 3 VOLUNTEERING TYPE 4 LEARNING AT TYPE 5 DECISION TYPE 6
COMMUNICATING HOME MAKING COLLABORATING WITH
THE COMMUNITY

EPSTEIN’S 6 TYPES OF INVOLVEMENT


 Type 1 “ Help all families establish home environments to support children as

students” (Epstein).

 When parents have the resources at home to help their children learning, the

more the child can develop positively.

 IDEA: The school and community can provide parents resources such

as reading, writing, math and technology classes, and tutoring for the parent and

child to help be equipped in those areas.

TYPE 1 PARENTING
 Type 2 Communicating “ Design effective forms of school-to-home and home-to-

school communications about school programs” (Epstein).

 Communication is a major part of development and growth. Making sure that all

parties are on the same page with information with keep ties open and will let the student

know that everyone is there for support. Newsletters, teacher-parent conferences, student

review work.

 IDEA: when sending home information make sure that it is clear, sent to all

parents, and translated if you have second language learners.

TYPE 2 COMMUNICATING
 Type 3 “Recruit and organize parent help and support” (Epstein).
 Having parents or family members involved with the student education makes
a huge impact on their learning and development. This not only models
positive interaction between peers but shows support for the child.
 IDEA: send emails, section in the newsletter, or notices for parent
involvement for activities in class or at school for especially with cultural
diversity.

TYPE 3 VOLUNTEERING
 Type 4 “ Provide information and ideas to families about how to help students
at home with homework and other curriculum-related activities, decisions, and
planning” (Epstein).
 Keeping parents on there toes at home about subjects, topics, and curriculum
that students will be learning will help parents be prepared for the activity
when it is brought home.
 IDEA: Send home links about topics, and curriculum for tutorials so that
parents can understand what is being learned, and able to help the student.

TYPE 4 LEARNING AT HOME


 Type 5 “include parents in school decision, developing parent leaders and
representatives” (Epstein).
 When parents are included in decision making, they include their children, in
which they feel more safe and secure about their child’s future.
 IDEA: Inform parents of PTA meetings, parent involvement for school
board meetings. Ask parents about their thoughts on revisions of policies.

TYPE 5 DECISION MAKING


 Type 6 “ Identify and integrate resources and services from the community to
strengthen school programs, family practices, and student learning” (Epstein).
 The community can make a difference by adding involvement to other
resources. Community health services, food banks, clothing providers, or even
church counseling can work together with schools and the parents to offer
services that may be needed.
 IDEA: contact community resources to see if they are willing to come out to
the schools to offer services, or provide the information within flyers or
newsletters.

TYPE 6 COLLABORATING WITH THE


COMMUNITY
 Berk, L. E. (2013). Child Development. (9th). Upper saddle , NJ : Pearson.
Retrieved from http://content.ashford.edu
 Epstein, J. L. (n.d.). Epstein's Framework of Six Types of Involvement.
Baltimore, MD. Retrieved from http://www.content.ashford.edu
 Lefrancois, G. R. (2012). Children's Journey: Exploring Early Childhood. San Diego,
CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.content.ashford.edu
 Mossler, R. (2014). Child and Adolescent Development. (2nd ed.). San Diego, CA:
Bridgepoint Education. Retrieved from http://content.ashford.edu/

REFERENCES