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Train-the-Trainer

Peer Recovery Support
Professionals Workshop
Welcome to the
Train-the-Trainer Workshop

Your Trainer is ______

Peer Recovery Support Professionals Training © 2014. All rights reserved.
TTT Manual
This PowerPoint series
Participant Workbook
Your contribution!
Please familiarize yourself
with the material and specifically,
the Table of Contents
in the TTT Manual.

(Please note that the page numbers on the
bottom left-hand side of each slide refer to
the corresponding page number in the TTT Manual.)

Peer Recovery Support Professionals Training © 2014. All rights reserved.
What is the Purpose of Training?

To provide mentors and trainers with competencies
that will enable them to effectively mentor, teach,
and communicate the skills necessary for certification
as a Peer Recovery Support Specialist.

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What is the Value of Training?

• To enhances professional growth,
• To impact the professional development of other
trainers
• To increase learning outcomes

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What is Essential to Training?

Knowledge of how to work with adult learners
is essential to effective training.

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What is the Trainer’s Role?

The trainer supports a growth process which includes
the following behaviors:

• Establishing a climate conducive to learning
• Using adult learning principles
• Encouraging learners to formulate their own
learning objectives
• Encouraging learners to identify and utilize a
variety of resources
• Assisting adult learners in evaluating their own
learning

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What is Involved in Mentoring?

• Effective mentoring rests on building and
maintaining a relationship of trust.

• It is a reciprocal and collaborative learning
relationship.

• Mentoring involves knowledge acquisition, its
application and reflective supervision.

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The Adult Mentoring and Learning Process

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How Do Adults Learn Best?

Adults learn best when they are involved in their own
learning, when they are:

• Diagnosing
• Planning
• Implementing
• Evaluating

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What Are Characteristics of Adult Learners?

Generally, you will find adult learners:

• To be self-directing
• To have a specific need to know
• To bring a life’s reservoir of experience
• To look for immediacy of application
• To be internally motivated to learn

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What is Required for Effective Training?

Effective training requires:

• Knowledge of adult learning principles
• A grasp of subject matter content
• Practice
• Good planning

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What is Expected of Trainers?

Trainers taking this TTT course should have complete
knowledge of:

• What a Peer Recovery Specialists needs to know
• What skills are required,
• What roles they play in the treatment community

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Hints for Becoming a Good Trainer

To become a good trainer, a person should:

• Take the time to prepare
• Learn the material
• Use his/her own words
• Incorporate experiential learning
• Emphasize lesson overview and objectives
• Model and demonstrate
• Provide a format for learner involvement

(See Page 8 of the TTT Manual for a fuller explanation of these points.)

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Are You Nervous About Presenting to a Group?

Two important ways to enhance your presentation
as a confident trainer:

1. Demonstrate your credibility
2. Minimize your stage fright

(We’ll give you more insight about these two points in the following slides.)

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Seven Steps to Demonstrate Credibility

1. Always be honest
2. Make your presentation balanced, free from bias
3. Deliver the facts clearly and simply
4. Ask questions about the information
5. Support the information with your own examples
and experiences
6. Cite authorities
7. Always invite questions and discussion

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Overcoming Stage Fright

• Know the material
• Rest up the night before
• Know your session introduction
• Release the tension
• Reframe
• Rehearse
• Know the training room and equipment
• Know the participants
• Reassure yourself
• Resist imitating another trainer’s style
• Concentrate on the message, not yourself.
• Concentrate on your learner’s needs

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Setting the Tone

• Who is responsible for setting the tone (an
atmosphere for effective participation) in a
training workshop?

• What types of behaviors set the tone?

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Setting the Climate

The following sections will give insight on how
a trainer can establish an open and effective
learning environment:

• Greeting
• Welcome and Opening
• Ice Breakers
• Management and Rules
• Teaching Strategies

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Setting the Climate - Greeting

• First impressions are very important.

• You help yourself and convey an impression by
completing the room set-up and arrange all
handouts well before the first participant arrives.

• You will then be free to greet the adult learners as
they come on site.

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Setting the Climate - Greeting

As participants arrive:

• Introduce yourself
• Wear a name badge
• Have participant name tags and name card “tents”
• Ask each person to sign the class attendance list
• Encourage participants to help themselves to
refreshments

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Setting the Climate - Welcome and Opening

During the welcoming and opening stages:

• Be at the front of the room
• Introduce yourself
• Identify restrooms and refreshments
• Be inviting
• Deliver your rehearsed opening
• Use eye contact with all participants

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Setting the Climate - Ice Breakers

“Ice Breakers” are short activities that help
participants:

• To feel energized
• To develop a feeling of comfort with each other
• To actively engage

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Setting the Climate - Housekeeping & Rules

Rules are important because they:

• Establish the working atmosphere in the room for
the duration of the training.
• Serve as a model for future trainers
• Serve as a learning model as participants think
through their own future as trainers

Rules should be posted in the training room for easy
viewing and reference.

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Setting the Climate - Teaching Strategies

As a trainer, you can be more effective by:

• Asking open-ended questions
• Reviewing participant statements
• Fostering discussion
• Listening reflectively
• Utilizing active listening
• Providing consistent feedback
• Moving and engaging

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Effective Facilitating

Remember, as participants are actively engaged,
they are more likely to retain, remember and recall
information conveyed during the training.

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Effective Facilitating

Active training requires the development of six key
skills:

1. Facilitating vs. Directing
2. “Wait Time”
3. Asking Questions
4. Answering Questions
5. Facilitating Discussion
6. Application Activities

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Effective Facilitating - Facilitating vs. Directing

• Lead the discussion. Don’t direct it!
• Draw ideas from the adult learners themselves.
• During group discussion, “step back,” minimizing
your contribution and maximizing the interaction
between participants.

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Effective Facilitating - Facilitating vs. Directing

Tips:

• Be respectful of all of the participants.
• Be enthusiastic about the topic and the training
program.
• Ask and encourage questions and idea sharing.

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Effective Facilitating – Wait Time

• Observe the “Conscious Use of Silence,” or count
to 10 before responding.
• If learners still do not respond, rephrase the
question.
• Invite people to contribute, encouraging hose who
have been quiet.

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Effective Facilitating – Asking Questions

It is the trainer’s responsibility to pose questions and
topics for discussion.

• Use open-ended questions
• Use “think back” questions
• Ask clear and concise questions
• Respond to incorrect answers
• Use encouraging remarks to honor participant
responses
• Redirect a participant’s question to the group

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What Would You Do?

What would you do if . . .

• You’re asked a question that you can’t answer?

• You’re asked a difficult question?

• You’re asked a question you don’t want to
answer?

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How Would You Handle It?

How would you handle a situation when ...

• The group has a discussion dominator?

• There is NO response from the group?

• There are disagreements within the group?

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Evaluation

• It is important to provide closure at the
completion of training.

• Evaluative information provided by the
participants should be used as a guide to inform
future training.

• Engage the participants by:
 Reviewing the key ideas of the training
 Soliciting a written evaluation

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Reflective Supervision

Reflective Supervision is a collaborative relationship
between the TTT trainer, the adult learners, and
future trainers.

• It enhances professional growth
• It improves instructional quality
• It strengthens teaching practices and skills

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Reflective Supervision

If you are the Reflective Supervisor, here are some guidelines
for the process:

• Prepare a checklist or a framework for guiding discussion.
• Establish opportunities for feedback.
• Clarify responsibilities and expectations for adult learners
at the next TTT session.
• Assess the values, knowledge and skills, the adult learner
has mastered by feedback and evaluation.
• Model and demonstrate any skill that will be required in
the future.
• Create a joint plan that will influence and enhance future
training sessions.

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A Trainer’s Dos and Don’ts

Before you look at Page 24 consider these questions:

• As an adult learner what has been effective in your
own learning experience in training sessions?

• What would you recommend as some Dos and
Don’ts in training adults?

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Training Requirement - Location

When choosing a site consider:

• Actual training room
• Access to mass transit and sufficient parking
• Handicap access
• Restrooms
• Space for a refreshment table

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Training Requirement – Equipment & Materials

Consider what you will need on site:

• Your computer
• A PowerPoint projector and screen
• An extension cord
• Easels, flip charts and markers
• Copy service

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Training Requirement – Equipment & Material

Additionally, you will need:

• Name badges and thin markers
• Pens at tables for participants to use
• Post-It notes
• lank newsprint paper, markers and masking tape

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Training Requirement - Everything

• A week in advance, confirm the availability of your
training site.

• A day or two before training, assemble your
equipment and materials.

• The day before training, confirm that your electrical
equipment is working together. Make one more call
to your training site to confirm times and condition
of the training room.

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On the Training Day

• Arrive early
• Check the room set-up
• Check or prepare the Refreshment Table
• Prepare the Sign-In Table (pens, badges, felt pens)
• Test the PowerPoint equipment and other training
materials
• Place directional signs to help participants find
the classroom
• Place a “Welcome/Introduction” PowerPoint slide
on the large screen

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Welcome to the
Train-the-Trainer Workshop

City/Town
Date
Trainer’s Name

Peer Recovery Support Professionals Training © 2014. All rights reserved.
Learning Needs Assessment

A Learning Needs Assessment (LNA) is a tool used to
identify the level of education, training needs,
expectations and desires of each participant.

Ask each participant to fill out the LNA and return it
to the trainer at an agreed-upon time on the first day.

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Defining the Participant’s Expectations

• It is very important to internally establish the adult
learner’s expectations and needs as well as your
own expectations.
• An exercise (which follows) can help to maintain the
centrality of these needs and expectations.
• The goal is to create a supportive atmosphere
where people feel free to take risks.
• Be honest. Be open. Be energetic.

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Exercise – Ice Breaker

To find out the participant’s backgrounds and their
expectations of the training, use these five questions:

1. Your name?
2. Where do you work?
(Alternatively: What are you currently doing? )
3. Why do you want to take this TTT course?
4. What would you like to accomplish during this
TTT course?
5. How do you think this training will help you?

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Exercise - Establish a Positive Climate
and Spirit of Cooperation
Project these two questions in preparation for
an open discussion:
1. What do you expect from this Peer Recovery
Support Specialist training?

2. What do you hope to take back to the lives of
recovering individuals and groups?

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Exercise: Guidelines for Working Effectively as a Group

In learning to work effectively as a group, this activity is
divided into two parts:
Part A - Brainstorming behaviors that positively affect
group dynamics

Part B - Establishing guidelines for working effectively
as a group

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Exercise: Guidelines for Working Effectively as a Group

Part A – Brainstorming

In an open discussion,
• First, identify behaviors which help effective
functioning of a group
• Next, identify behaviors which interfere with group
functioning

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Exercise: Guidelines for Working Effectively as a Group

Part B – Developing Guidelines

Here, the facilitator and the group develop a number of
guidelines for this group to work together effectively.

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Exercise: Guidelines for Working Effectively as a Group

Examples of Beneficial Guidelines:

• Listen and "hear"
• Avoid put-downs
• Refrain from speaking too often or too long
• Give everyone a chance to speak
• Be prompt

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Effective Training Techniques

Here, we explore how each participant “presents” with
a view to being better equipped to:

• Provide information
• Teach skills
• Change values or attitudes.

(Each of these goals is expanded in the following slides.)

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Effective Training Techniques: To Provide Information

Ways that a trainer can impart a specific volume and
type of information are through:

– Individual Presentations
– Panel Presentations
– Debates
– Dialogue
– Dramatic Presentations

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Effective Training Techniques: To Provide Information

Follow-Up Activities involving group participation:

• Forum
• Question Period
• Buzz Groups

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Effective Training Techniques: Teach Skills or Behaviors

Activities that are well-suited for skills and behavior
training:
• Case Study
• Demonstration
• Games, Structured Experiences
• Simulation
• Teaching/Learning Team

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Effective Training Techniques: Teach Skills or Behaviors

Follow-up Activities that are well-suited for skills and
behavior training:
• Application Projects
• Practice

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Effective Training Techniques: To Change Value or Attitudes

Training techniques that are suitable for attempting
to change attitudes and values:
• Circle response
• Field trips or tours
• Games
• Role playing
• Simulations
• Skits

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Effective Training Techniques: To Change Value or Attitudes

Follow-Up Activities:

• Forum
• Question Period
• Group Discussion
• Informal Small Group Discussion

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Exercise: Create a Training Session

Divide the participants into groups of two or three persons with the
goal of developing a training session using one of the training tools.
Possible topics are:

• History of Recovery Coaching
• Addiction as a Chronic Disease
• Types of Recovery Coaches
• Harm Reduction Theory
• Writing a Recovery Plan
• Use of Personal Narratives in Recovery
• Use of Medicines to Aid in Recovery
• Roles of Recovery Support Centers in the Recovery Management
Model
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Managing Classroom Conflict

• Conflict can be reduced by identifying and clarifying
expectations and developing group cohesion.

• Handling conflict requires the management of
emotions (trainer’s as well as the participant’s).

• A “troublesome” issue may intensify especially if
the issue is not addressed adequately when it first
arises.

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Strategies and Tactics to De-escalate Conflict

Remember the points of the process by the acronym
SOAR-UP:

S – Stop
O – Outcome Options
A – Assess the Situation
R – React to the Participant’s Comments
U – Use Active Listening Techniques
P – Presenting

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

This activity is divided into three parts:
• Part A - Work in small groups discussing how to
address a number of facilitation dilemmas
• Part B - Each group sharing the results of its
discussion with the larger class
• Part C - The facilitator receiving an evaluation of the
exercise

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part A - Has six practice scenarios:
Situation/Scenario 1
Three sub-groups are portrayed in this exercise.
• One has used 10 minutes,
• A second has used 20 minutes and is still presenting,
• A third has not yet started but only 15 minutes is
left of the available time.
What do you do?
Explain the rationale for your decision.
(See the TTT Manual for a fuller description.)

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part A - Situation/Scenario 2
There is discussion on a topic which has particular
interest for you but you do not agree with the findings.

What do you do?
Explain the rationale for your decision.

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part A - Situation/Scenario 3
In a “Tools for Recovery from Addiction” training
session, there are three participants who are
characterized as:

• The Hesitant One,
• The Monopolizer,
• The Non-listener.
What do you do?
Explain the rationale for your decision.
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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part A - Situation/Scenario 4
In a “Harm Reduction Theory” training session, an
argument erupts over gender equality and LGBT rights.
What do you do?
Explain the rationale for your decision.

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part A - Situation/Scenario 5
In a training session on various addiction recovery
models, there are three participants who are
characterized as:

1. The Rigid One
2. The Idea Zapper
3. The Complainer
What do you do?
Explain the rationale for your decision.
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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part A - Situation/Scenario 6
Facilitating a 3-day training workshop designed by
someone else, you are provided with the training
materials piece by piece, with little time to prepare.
What do you do?
Explain the rationale for your decision.

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part B - Involves sharing strategies to address each
situation/scenarios and the issues raised.

The whole group has opportunity to comment on each
group’s presentation.

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part B - Explores each learner’s stance on power and
conflict.

Questions explore each of these areas:
• My understandings and perceptions
• My interactions
• My actions to bring about peaceful resolution
• My perceptions in the midst of conflict

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part C - Involves evaluation.

Activity 1 — Providing Feedback

• The goal of the TTT’s Course is to attain training
objectives.
• Did the adult learners receive and retain the
information and skills they needed?

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part C - Involves evaluation.

Activity 1 — Providing Feedback

Feedback Tips:
• Be objective
• Be specific
• Limit the amount of feedback you provide
• Be constructive

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part C - Involves evaluation.

Activity 2 — Developing Training Assessments

This is an opportunity :
• To illustrate the assessment process
• To provide feedback on the training activities
• To identify areas which may need reinforcement,
further discussion, or modification

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Exercise: Handling Dilemmas

Part C - Involves evaluation.

Activity 2 — Developing Training Assessments
Through a series of PowerPoint slides, pose the
questions referenced on the following slides.

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What questions would you ask on an
evaluation form when you are the trainer?

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Do you prefer to have this evaluation in a
group discussion and/or in a written form?

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What did I like about today and why?

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What did I not like about today and why?

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What did I learn and experience today
Which I will be able to use?

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How could today’s training be improved?

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“Thank You” for
participating in this training!