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Lean

Manufacturing
BOUAMAMA ABDELLAH
ECHBARBI SALIM
SMALI HAMZA
•Introduction
•Definition
•History
•Toyota Production
System
Outline •Principles of Lean
manufacturing
•Goals
•Value
•Waste
•Conclusion
Introduction
Definition
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Lean manufacturing Waste

Lean manufacturing is all about the Waste is defined as any activity that does
optimization of processes by eliminating not add value from the customer’s
waste and lowering costs while adding perspective.
value to the end product
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History
TPS
First lean project 6

Toyota Production System


Principles of Lean manufacturing
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The Seven Wastes (timwood) 8
1. Transport
2. Inventory
3. Motion
4. Waiting
5. Over Processing
6. Over Production
7. Defects
The Waste of Transport 9
Costs : Solution : the 8 rights
1. material handling equipment
1. Right Quantity
2. Employees
2. Right Quality
3. training 3. Right Materials
4. safety precautions 4. Right time
5. extra space for the movement 5. Right Place
of material 6. Right Source
6. Damaging products 7. Right Price
8. Right Service.
The Waste of Inventory 10
Costs :
Solution :
1. Need space The principle of
just in time (JIT)
2. Need packaging
3. Price variation
4. safety precaution
5. Damaging products
The Waste of Motion 11
«Moving is not exactly working»

Exemples :
1. Retrieving objets at the floor
level instead of the same one
2. Exessive travels between
workstation
The Waste of Waiting 12

Exemples :
1. waiting for a machine to finish /
a product to arrive
Costs :
1. Employees salary
2. Losing Customers
The waste of Overproduction 13
Costs :
1. Make you short on
capital
2. Short on raw material
3. Lead to bankruptcy
The Waste of Over-processing 14
Exemples :
1. Oversize equipment
2. Working with tight tolerences
The Waste of Defects 15
Causes :
1. Processes done buy different
operators on different shifts
2. Not providing training to the
employees
3. paying for quantity rather
than quality
Goals
There are four goals of Lean manufacturing systems
Goals
The four common goals 17

The goals of lean manufacturing systems differ


between various authors. While some maintain an
The Goals internal focus to increase profit for the
organization, others claim that improvements
should be done for the sake of the customer
Goals
Some commonly mentioned goals 18

Improve quality Eliminate waste Reduce time Reduce total costs


Goals
The four common goals 19

To stay competitive in today's marketplace, a


company must understand its customers' wants
Improve quality and needs and design processes to meet their
expectations and requirements.
Goals
The four common goals 20

Waste is any activity that consumes time,


Eliminate waste resources, or space but does not add any value to
the product or service.
Goals
The four common goals 21

Reducing the time it takes to finish an activity from


Reduce time start to finish is one of the most effective ways to
eliminate waste and lower costs.
Goals
The four common goals 22

To minimize cost, a company must produce only to


customer demand. Overproduction increases a
Reduce total costs company’s inventory costs because of storage
needs.
Value
Value is created by the producer. From a customer’s standpoint
Value
value should always be considered from a customer perspective. 24
Value or added-value
Value is created by the producer. From a customer’s
standpoint, this is why producers exist…. The critical starting
point for lean thinking is value. Value can only be defined by
the ultimate customer. And it’s only meaningful when
expressed in terms of a specific product (a good or service,
often both at once) which meets the customer’s needs at a
specific point in time
Conclusion
Thank You!
Any Questions?