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Diode characteristics

PREPARED BY: ANA JOY P. DONO


Diode is simply a PN Junction Diode, but its applications are
extensive in electronic circuits.

The resulting device which get after junction formation is called a


Diode.
The symbolic representation
Anode Cathode
The region connected to the P-region of the diode is called “Anode”.
The region connected to the N-region is called “Cathode”.
The diode can conduct current only in one direction.
The diode can be biased in two ways:-
1- Forward Biasing
2- Reverse Biasing
A PN-junction diode is formed
when a p-type semiconductor is
fused to an n-type
semiconductor creating a
potential barrier voltage across
the diode junction.
-it is one of the simplest
semiconductor devices around,
and which has the characteristic of
passing current in only one
direction only.
Junction Diode Symbol and Static I-V Characteristics
There are two operating regions and
three possible “biasing” conditions for
the standard Junction Diode and these
are:
1. Zero Bias PN-Junction– No external voltage potential is applied to the PN
junction diode.
When a diode is Zero Biased no external energy source is applied and a natural Potential
Barrier is developed across a depletion layer which is approximately 0.5 to 0.7v for silicon diodes
and approximately 0.3 of a volt for germanium diodes.
“Forward Current” or I𝐹
if the diodes terminals are shorted together,
a few holes (majority carriers) in the P-type
material with enough energy to overcome the
potential barrier will move across the junction
against this barrier potential.
“Reverse Current” or I𝑅
Likewise, holes generated in the N-type material
(minority carriers), find this situation favorable and
move across the junction in the opposite direction.
2. Reverse Bias – The voltage potential is connected negative,
(-) to the P-type material and positive, (+) to the N-type material across the
diode which has the effect of Increasing the PN junction diode’s width.
When a junction diode is Reverse Biased the thickness of the depletion region increases and the
diode acts like an open circuit blocking any current flow, (only a very small leakage current).

Increase in the Depletion Layer due to Reverse Bias


Reverse bias condition

In this case the diode is connected


in reverse bias. The ammeter is
connected in series and the
voltmeter is Connected in parallel
•As the reverse voltage is increased above zero in suitable steps, the
depletion region gets enlarged due to reverse bias condition.
•The is very small due to minority carriers. It is in the range of micro
amperes.
•As the reverse bias further increase, break down of covalent bonds
occur due to the phenomenon of a avalanche break down and the
current increase rapidly.
Reverse characteristic
3. Forward Bias – The voltage potential is connected positive, (+) to the P-
type material and negative, (-) to the N-type material across the diode which
has the effect of Decreasing the PN junction diodes width.
When a junction diode is Forward Biased the thickness of the depletion region reduces and the
diode acts like a short circuit allowing full current to flow.

Forward Characteristics Curve for a Junction Diode

The application of a forward biasing voltage on the


junction diode results in the depletion layer
becoming very thin and narrow which represents a
low impedance path through the junction thereby
allowing high currents to flow. The point at which this
sudden increase in current takes place is
represented on the static I-V characteristics curve
above as the “knee” point.
Forward bias condition

In this case the diode is connected in forward bias. The


ammeter is connected in series to measure the current and
the voltmeter is Connected in parallel to the diode to
measure the voltage across the diode
-If the forward bias is increased from zero V f  Vo
the forward current If is zero until V f  Vo
because the potential barrier prevents the holes and electrons to
flow across the depletion region in the opposite direction.

- For V f  Vo the potential barrier at the junction completely


disappear, the holes cross the junction from P- type to N-type and
the electrons cross the junction in the opposite direction
Forward characteristic

The voltage at which the potential barrier is over come by the


forward voltage is called
( cut in or threshold voltage).
Reduction in the Depletion Layer due to Forward Bias

This condition represents the low


resistance path through the PN junction
allowing very large currents to flow
through the diode with only a small
increase in bias voltage. The actual
potential difference across the junction or
diode is kept constant by the action of the
depletion layer at approximately 0.3v for
germanium and approximately 0.7v for
silicon junction diodes.
Junction Diode Ideal and Real Characteristics