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³School-based enterprises are effective


educational tools in helping to prepare students for
the transition from school to work or college. For
many students, they provide the first work
experience; for others, they provide an opportunity
to build management, supervision and leadership
skills.´

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ð 0ccording to the Small Business 0dministration, all
growth in private sector employment and output is
attributable to small businesses.
ð Small businesses are responsible for over half of all
goods and services produced by our economy.
ð Over 600,000 small businesses (with 20 or fewer
employees) are started each year.
ð The success of our economy is dependent upon the
success of small business.
ð There has never been a more urgent need for
entrepreneurial education in 0rkansas¶s schools.
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ð The SBE project offers students an opportunity to
engage in authentic learning.
i      

ð The SBE concept provides students with practical
experience in managing and operating a small
business.
ð The concept allows students an opportunity to take
risks in an environment where the emphasis will be
on learning.
ð The concept allows students to take ownership of a
small business and experience many of the same
challenges that real entrepreneurs face.
ð Students will be more likely to view small business
ownership as a viable career path.

  
 

a   
This article
appeared in
the 0pril/May
2008 edition
of the DEC0
Dimensions
magazine.
0rticle in
V 
Newspaper

ð „     
 
 
  


 
 
ð „     
 
   

    
r  

 

 

   

ð 0 


 
ð 
   
ð    
    

ð  

 
ð  
 

 
  
ð   
ð 
  

0  
ð   
   
ð   
   
ð  ! 
 
   
   

ð 0 


 
ð Building Principal
ð Superintendent
ð Perkins Coordinator
ð Form an 0dvisory Committee or use the
existing committee
   

ð 
   
ð Migh Visibility
ð Media Center
ð Main Mallway
ð Proximity to the Marketing Classroom
ð 0dequate Space
ð 0ccess to Water, Drainage, Electricity
   

ð    
    

ð Rndustry Standard Training


ð 0 
    ÷ 

÷ 
 
   

ð  

 
ð Visit other SBEs
ð Visit private sector businesses
ð 0n architect can create a detailed demolition
and construction plan
   

ð  
 

 
  
ð r÷÷ 

ð  ÷÷ 
÷

p 

  
 
     

    

p    

   =

 

M i 
i  

   
 


 
   
   
 
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 i 
   

ð   
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÷
ð  ÷

ð ÷÷

   

ð 
  

0  
ð u

ðr ÷

ð 

ð !

Ú
   
  
 
    

   

ð   
   
ð Purchase industry standard equipment
ð Use slat walls
ð Video Surveillance
 
ð Espresso Brewer (1)
ð Espresso Bean Grinder (1)
ð Regular Coffee Brewer (1)
ð Regular Coffee Bean Grinder (1)
ð Point-of-Sale System (Cash Register) (2)
ð Under-counter Refrigerator (2)
ð Refrigerated Self-Service Merchandiser (1)
ð Rce Maker, Free Standing (1)
ð Blender (2)
ð Three Chamber Sink (1)
ð Mand Washing Station (1)
 ! 
ð Security Cameras
ð Display Lighting
ð Display Fixtures/Slat Wall
ð Display Props
ð Display Case/Window
ð Sound System
ð Keyed/Combination Safe
ð Telephone
ð Storage Cabinets
ð Neon Open Sign
ð Plasma or LCD Television
ð Business Sign on Gator Board or Backlight Plastic
ð Furniture/Seating 0ppropriate for Space
   

ð   
   
ð Equipment suppliers
ð Coffee and related products
ð Paper products
p 

 
 

 ! 
 " 
    
#
Ú  $  %  
&  
  
       
 
  '       


Ú  
Ê          
 

Clark Office Products Mr. Rick Dixon General Office Cash Register Receipt
116 North Walnut Street Marrison, 0R 72601 Supplies Tape
(870) 741-2714

Espresso Supply 1123 NW 51st Street Specialty Coffee Shop Pitchers, Knock Boxes,
Seattle, Washington, 98107 Products Tampers, Packing mats,
1-800-782-6671 thermometers, brushes,
cream whippers

Food Service 1000 Pat Nash Drive, B-1, Building 6


Equipment Brokers Branson, MO 65616 Restaurant Equipment Blenders, refrigerators,
(417)-334-2552 sinks, ice makers

Pippin Wholesale Mr. Jackie Mathis Restaurant Supplies Cups, lids, straws, sugar,
Company 512 Mighway 62-65 non-dairy creamer,
Marrison, 0R 72601 sanitizer, bottle water
870) 741-3421

POS Core 9624 153rd 0venue NE Point of sale systems Point of sale hardware
Technologies, Rnc. Redmond, W0 98052 and software
(425) 947-0057

Quill Corporation P.O. Box 94080 General office and Rnk pens, pencils,
Palatine, RL 60094-4080 school supplies mechanical pencils,
1-800-789-1331 paper

Specialty Beverages of Kim and Ellen Schreyer Specialty coffee shop Coffee beans, Torani
0rkansas 2715 Bowman Lane supplies syrups, chocolate syrup,
Conway, 0R 72034 smoothie mix
(501) 773-0077

Wal-Mart Supercenter 1417 Mighway 62 65 North General supplies Milk, heavy whipping
Marrison, 0R 72601 cream, powdered sugar,
(870) 365-8400 club soda
   

ð  ! 
 
   
ð Encourage ownership of the project
ð The profits should belong to the students
ð Use an organizational chart
ð 0llow the students to become a self directed
work team
  "p
1. What is the number one selling beverage in a
modern specialty coffee shop?

0. Regular coffee
B. Decaffeinated coffee
C. Carbonated soft drinks
D. Fruit juice
E. Bottled water
F. Milk
  "p
ð Coffee is bad for you. Wrong. There is no relationship
between the moderate consumption of coffee and ill
health.
ð Today, more money is spent on the international trade of
coffee than on any other commodity except oil.
ð 0ccording to a 2005 Marvard University study of
155,000 nurses, those who drank the most coffee
seemed to develop a protection against high blood
pressure.
ð The most important factor that will determine the
success or failure of a coffee shop is the ³environment.´