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HAZARD COMMUNICATION

AND CHEMICAL SAFETY


Makinano, Jill Manel D.
Mangunlay, Lady Lynesse G.
Sedrome, Christian A.
Purpose of the Hazard Communication and
Chemical Safety Guideline:

• To provide guidance for personnel to understand the


hazards of chemicals they work with;
• To provide appropriate training to assist personnel in
working with these chemicals safely;
• To avoid exposures that could be dangerous to their health
and safety.
How hazard communication works:

Source: OSHA
Employer responsibilities under the HCS:

• Ensure labels are on incoming labels and not defaced


• Ensure Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) are readily accessible
• Ensure chemicals in workplace are properly labeled, tagged, or marked
• Provide information and training to employees
• Provide information/access for employees in multi-employer workplaces
• Develop, implement, and maintain a written hazard communication program
COMMONLY USED PROGRAM MANAGEMENT FORMS

 Non-Routine Task - Protective Measures Determination Form:

Used by Supervisors to Assess Jobs That Are Not Performed on a


Routine Basis, but Where the Possibility of Injury to an Employee
Exists.

 Request for Copy of MSDS Form:

Used by Employees to Formally Request a Copy of A Specific Material


Safety Data Sheet.
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS
Safety data sheet (SDS):
Available and accessible to workers
Required for all hazardous chemical used
Do not use hazardous chemicals if there is no SDS
available
VARIOUS SECTIONS OF THE MSDS (TYPICAL FORMAT)
SECTION CONTENTS

I Product Identity
II Hazardous Ingredients
III Physical/Chemical Characteristics
IV Fire/Explosion/Physical Hazard Data
Source: OSHA
V Reactivity Data
VI Health Hazards Data
VII Precautions for Safe Handling and Use
VIII Control Measures/Protection Information
IX Additional Information/Special Precautions
Labelling Requirements
• All employers must maintain a labelling program.
• Train all employees whose job brings them into contact with
chemicals in the use of labels.
• All labels will use the same name as it appears on the MSDS.
• All chemical containers will be labelled.
• No container that resembles a drinking glass, cup, or other type of
container used for consumption will be used for chemical storage
or containment.
• The employer must provide sufficient labels for labelling.
NFPA - NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION
ASSOCIATION
FIVE HMIS HAZARD
LEVELS HEALTH

 - 4 SEVERE FLAMMABILITY
 - 3 SERIOUS
 - 2 MODERATE REACTIVITY
 - 1 SLIGHT
 - 0 MINIMAL PERSONAL PROTECTION
HMIS - HAZARDOUS MATERIAL
IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM
FIRE HAZARD
FIVE NFPA HAZARD
LEVELS REACTIVITY

 - 4 EXTREME
4
 - 3 HIGH
 - 2 MODERATE
2 1
 - 1 SLIGHT
 - 0 INSIGNIFICANT
HEALTH HAZARD W
SPECIFIC HAZARD
(WATER REACTIVE)
Example:

DOT
Warning
Labels
Hazards of Chemicals
There are 2 basic types of chemical hazards:

Physical Hazards
Chemicals are classified as having Physical Hazards if they are:

Explosive  Flammable
 Compressed Gas  Unstable
 Combustible Liquids  Water Reactive
 Oxidizers
Health Hazards
Chemicals are classified as being a health hazard if they:

Can cause cancer


Are poisonous (toxic)
Cause harm to your skin, internal organs, or nervous system
Are corrosive - such as acids
Cause allergic reactions after repeated exposure
Chemicals can enter the body through:

• Inhalation if you breath


fumes, mists or dust
• Absorption if liquid or dust
touches or spills on you or
splashes in your eyes
• Ingestion if you eat after
handling chemicals
• accidental swallowing of a
chemical
Chemicals can be safely used if…
• you know the hazards and how to protect yourself
• they are used only for approved purposes
• they are stored properly
• you use the correct personal protective equipment
• you do not eat in areas where chemicals are used
• you wash immediately if you come in contact with chemicals
Protecting Yourself…

• Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)


may be needed to protect yourself from
chemical hazards
• Use the PPE required for each chemical
• Check the PPE before use to make sure it
is not damaged
• Read MSDSs for first aid information