You are on page 1of 36

Components of Milk

SEMINAR PRESENTED BY
Siraj-uddin
M- 5633 (MVSc)
DIVISION OF LPT
Components of Milk 

Milk  may  be  defined  as  the  whole,  fresh, 


clean,  lacteal  secretion  obtained  by  the 
complete  milking  of  one  or  more  healthy 
milch  animals,  excluding  that  obtained 
within 15 days before or 5 days after calving.
Standards for different milks in India
Minimum
S.N Class of Designation % Fat % SNF
o milk
1 Buffalo milk Raw Pasteurized, 5-6 9.0
boiled,
flavoured and
sterilized

2 Cow Milk -do- 3.5-4.0 8.5


3 Goat or do- 3.0-3.5 9.0
sheep milk

4 Standardized -do- 4.5 8.5


milk
Minimum
S.No Class of Designation % Fat % SNF
milk
5. Recombined Raw Pasteurized 3.0 8.5
milk boiled,
flavoured and
sterilized

6. Toned milk -do- 3.0 8.5

7 Double -do- 1.5 9.0


toned milk
8. Skim Milk -do- Not more 8.7
than 0.5
Average Percentage composition
S.NO Name of Water Fat Protein Lactos Ash
. Species e

1 Cow 86.6 4.6 3.4 4.9 0.7


(Foreign
)
2. Cow 86.5 4.9 3.2 4.6 0.7
(Zebu)

3. Buffalo 84.2 6.6 3.9 5.2 0.8

4. Human 87.7 3.6 1.8 6.8 0.1


Name of Water Fa Prote Lacto As
Species t in se h
5 Sheep 79.4 8.6 6.7 4.3 1.0

6 Goat 86.5 4.5 3.5 4.7 0.8

7 Mare 89.1 1.6 2.7 6.1 0.5


Terms to describe milk fractions:
Plasma = Milk - fat (Skim milk)

Serum = Plasma - casein micelles (whey)

SNF = Protein, lactose, minerals, acids,


enzymes vitamins

TS = Fat + SNF
Milk described as:
 An oil­in­water emulsion with fat globules 
dispersed in the continuous serum phase

 A Colloidal suspension  of casein micelles, 
globular proteins and lipoprotein particles

 A solution of lactose, soluble proteins, minerals, 
vitamins etc.
MILK
Total Solids
Water

Fat (Lipids) SNF


Emulsion form
(50-100 nm dia.)
Lactose Mineral Other
Nitrogen
(solution form matter constituents
True fat ( 98% TGs + Associated Substance
MG+ DG+ FFA Substance .01 -1 nm)
PO4, citrates ,
Chlorides of Na, K,
Ca, Mg + traces of
Phospholipids Vitamins Fe, Cu, I etc.
(Lecithin, Cephalin, Cholesterol Carotene
(A,D,E,K)
Sphyngomylin)
•Pigments
•Dissolved Gases
•Vit. C &
Protein B Complex.
Non protein (Suspension, 1-100nm dia.)
•Enzymes etc

Caseins
β Lactglobulin α- Lactalbumin Proteose Peptones
(α,β,γ,κ)
Approximate Composition : (Cow)
 Water 87 %   (85­88%)
 Fat 3.9 %  (2.4­5.5 %)
 SNF 8.8%   ( 7.9­10.0%)

Protein  3.25%
 

•  Lactose 4.6%
•  Minerals 0.65­0.7% (Ca, P, citrate, Mg ,Na ,K, 
Zn,Cl,Fe,Cu,So4,HCo3)
• Acids ­0.18% 
(citrate,formate,acetate,lactate,oxalate)
• Enzymes ­ Peroxides, catalase, phosphatase, lipase
• Gases  ­    Oxygen, Nitrogen
• Vitamins­ ADEK, C&B Vitamins
Constituents of Milk:
Water
  water constitutes the medium in which other 
milk constituents are either  dissolved or 
suspended.

 Mostly in free from but some portion also in 
bound form being firmly bound by milk proteins, 
PL etc.
Milk Fat/ Lipids
Economic importance  – price index 

Structure
 The bulk of the milk fat in milk exists in the 
form of small globules  which average 3µm in 
size (0.1­22µm).
 The surface of  fat globules is coated with an 
adsorbed layer ­ FGM.  
 FGM contains PL & proteins in the form of a 
complex that stabilizes the emulsion (prevents fat 
globules from coalescing & separating ) 

 IgM forms a complex with lipoproteins called 
cryoglobulin

  Cryoglobulin precipitates on to the FG and cause 
flocculation  ­ cold agglutination 

 
 
Milk Lipids (Chemical properties)
 Originate either from microbial activity in 
rumen and transported  to secretary cells via 
blood and lymph or synthesis in the secretary 
cells
 Main lipids in milk are triglycerides 
(glycerol+3FA , 98%) 
 Major Fatty acids in milk:

  Long chain                        Short chain 
C14­Myristic 11%                        C4­Butyric
C16­Palmitic 26%                        C6­Caproic
C18­Stearic   10%                        C8­Caprylic
C18:1­Oleic   20%                         C10­Capric 
 There is a small number of mono, diglycerides and 
FFA  in fresh milk which may be due to either early 
lipolysis  or incompelete synthesis 

 Other lipid classes in milk

  Phospholipids (0.8%) mainly associated with FGM 

  Cholesterol (0.3%) mainly located in FG core 

                                
Lipids of milk
Constituent Range of Location in milk
occurrence
Triglycerides 98-99% Fat globules
PL (Lec ,ceph, sphing) 0.2-1.0% Globule
membrane and
serum
Sterols (Cholesterol, 0.25-0.40% Fat globules,
Lansterol) globule membrane
and milk serum
FFA Traces Fat globules and
milk serum
Milk Proteins
Fall into two distinct types

  Caseins

 Whey protein
Caseins
 Found only in milk

 Caseins constitute about 80% of total protein

 Caseins have five classes

~ Alpha S1
~ Alpha s2
~ Beta
~ Kappa
~ Gamma (Proteolysis of β­casein) ( < 5%)
• Caseins are resistant to heat denaturation 
because:
~ Primary structure completely defined
~ have a modest size
~ Do not possess an organized structure
~ Lack tertiary structure & disulfide bonds
~ Very little structure to unfold
• Present in colloidal state
• Have low solubility at pH 4.6
• Conjugated proteins (mostly with phosphate 
groups)
• Calcium binding is proportional to phosphate 
content.
Whey  proteins 

  Milk  precipitation at pH 4.6  Supernatant 

(whey proteins ) 
  Colloidal state 

 Globular proteins 

  more water soluble than caseins 

 Heat denaturable ( @ >650C)

 Have good gelling and whipping properties 

  Principal fractions: 

 B – lactoglobulim, MW­ 18,000
 Alpha­ lactalbumin, MW­14,000
Lactose

 Disaccharide ­ one   molecule each of glucose and 
galactose. 

 By weight the most abundant of milk solids 

   (4.8­5.2% of milk; 52% of SNF,70% of whey solids)

 Exists only in milk in true solution form in milk 
serum.
Minerals:
Although  present  in  small  quantities,  exert 
considerable  influence  on  the  physico­  chemical 
and nutritive profile of milk
All 22 minerals considered essential to the human 
diet are present in milk. These include 3 families of 
salts:
1) Na,K,Cl: these free ions are negatively correlated 
 to lactose to maintain osmotic equilibrium of milk 
with blood  
 

2) Ca,Mg,P & citrate: This group consists of 
2/3Ca,1/3Mg,1/2P and <1/10 citrate in colloidal 
(non­diffusible) form & present in casein micelle.

3) Diffusible salts of Ca,Mg, citrate & Po4 – these 
salts are pH dependant and contribute to overall 
Acid base equilibrium of milk 

 
THE MINERAL CONTENT OF FRESH MILK

Mineral Content Per litre


Sodium (mg) 350-900
Potassium (mg) 1100-1700
Chloride (mg) 900-1100
Calcium (mg) 1100-1300
Magnesium (mg) 90-140
Phosphorous (mg) 900-1000
Zinc (µg) 2000-6000
Copper (µg) 100-600
Manganese (µg) 20-50
Iodine (µg) 260
   
Minor Milk Constituents:

1. Phospholipids (0.2­1.0%)
 
 Present in FGM & Milk serum.
  Three types viz., lecithin, cephalin and 
sphingomyelin 
  Lecithin 
   ~forms an imp. Constituent of FGM ~contributes 
to the richness of flavor of milk     and other dairy 
products
   ~ Highly sensitive to oxidative deterioration      
giving rise to  oxidative/ metallic flavors.
PL  are  excellent  emulsifying  agents  and  serve  to 
stabilize milk fat emulsion 
2. Cholesterol (0.25­0.40%)
 In complex formation with proteins in the non­fat 
portion of milk.
Present  as  part  of the  FGM complex  in fat portion 
of milk
3. Pigments
i. Fat soluble­ carotene, xanthophyl 

ii. water soluble – riboflavin  
 Carotene is responsible for the yellow colour of 
milk, cream, butter, ghee and other fat rich dairy 
products.

 Acts as an antioxidant 

 Precursor of Vit.A

 Has two forms alpha and Beta, the former yields 
one while latter  two molecules of Vit.A.

 Dairy animals differ in their capacity to transfer 
carotene from feed to milk fat.

    
 Buffalo milk is whiter in colour 

  (carotenoid content 0.25­0.48µg/g  vs. cow milk 
~30µg/g)

 Riboflavin, besides being a Vit. is a greenish yellow 
pigment­ gives characteristic colour to whey  
     Enzymes:
 
 Milk is rich in native enzymes 
  About 50 different enzyme activities are reported­ 
only a small number has significance.
    Lipoprotein Lipase 
  Principal lipase in milk
  catalyzes the hydrolysis of TG to FFA
  Present in appreciable quantities in freshly drawn 
milk.
  Pronounced reactions lead to production of soapy, 
bitter, rancid and unclean flavors 
      Plasmin
 Major milk proteinase

 Has a trypsin like activity 

 Identical to blood plasmin and 
concentration in milk is associated with 
blood concentration
 High milk plasmin is seen in conditions like 

    ~ Early lactation 
    ~ Late lactation 
    ~ Udder diseases 
(Leakage of blood components into milk)
  Index of high plasimn activity 

    ~ High levels of gamma casein 

    ~  Bacteriologically sound milk 

  At neutral pH heat stable 

  Survives pasteurization / UHT treatment 

 Lactoperoxidase

  Present in high concentrations 

 Catalyzes transfer of O2 from H2 O2 to other substrates  
like Thiocyanate 
  Has potential to catalyze oxidation of USFA leading 
to development of oxidized flavour 

  Extraneous addition of SCN and H2 o2 in milk – acts 
as a powerful bactericide.

 Short term preservation of milk in developing 
countries where refrigeration is scarce.

  Xanthin Oxidase 

 Catalyzes Non­ Specific oxidation of dairy products 

 Overall significance is not high.  
  Alkaline Phosphatase 
  Completely inactivated by pasteurization 
  used as index of efficiency of pasteurization 

     Vitamins                
  Essential  for many life processes 

 Substantial quantities found in milk 

    ~  Fat soluble –A,D,E,K
    ~  water soulble B1,B2, B6, B12, niacin, 
pantothenic acid, biotin, folic acid  
    Urea
  Responsible for Seasonal variation in heat 
stability  
 Concentration in milk controlled by 
concentration in blood   which in turn is 
controlled by diet.
 Mechanism by which urea influences heat 
stability :
   Urea decompose on heating to yield 
isocyanate which reacts with free SH 
groups in WP and/or Kappa casein 
  High levels of urea are associated with 
very stable milk.
CONCLUSION

 Milk is considered a near complete  single food in 

nature because it contains almost all essential 

nutrients required for growth and development in 

adequate and assimilable forms.

 Considered as chief protective food because it has 

abundant vitamins and calcium