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Group 3

 Primary
- A small social group whose members share personal
and lasting relationships.
Examples of Primary Groups:

FAMILY FRIENDS LOVE RELATIONSHIPS


 Secondary
- Large clusters of people who have a mutually shared
purpose, often aiming to complete tasks. They are much less likely
to be an influence to an individual’s identity.
Examples of Secondary Groups:

School/Class Workplace
 IN-GROUPS
- A group wherein people feel that they are part of the social group.

Example:
George is a werewolf. Whenever he meets other
werewolves, he already knows some things about them:
what they do on full moon nights, what their sense of smell
is like, even some of the foods that they crave. He knows this
because he belongs to the same group as them; they
are in-group members for George.
 OUT-GROUPS
- Opposite of in-group.
- A group you aren’t part of.
Example:
John, meanwhile, is a vampire. When George meets John,
he doesn't know what John's like on full moon nights or
what his sense of smell is like, and he's not sure if John eats
meat or just sticks to blood. Because John belongs to a
different group than George, he is an out-group
member to George.
 Used in order to evaluate and determine the nature of given
individual or other group’s characteristics and sociological
attributes.

 Used in order to guide our behavior and attitudes and help us to


identify social norms.
 Informal reference groups – It is based on the groups shared
interests and goals. Members react on a personal level.

 Formal reference groups – have a specific goal or mission.

 Membership reference groups – groups that are in agreement with


in regards to attitude, norms, and behaviors.
 Disclaimant reference groups – group we do not agree with in
regards to attitudes, norms, and behaviors.

 Aspirational reference group – a group an individual doesn’t


belong to but aspires to become a part in the future.

 Dissociative reference group – a group an individual doesn’t


belong to and disapproves of inn regards to attitudes, norms, and
behaviors.
A theoretical construct useful in the social sciences to study
relationships between individuals, groups, organizations, or even
entire societies. It is a social structure that exists between actors
(individuals and organizations).

3 Levels of Analysis
 Micro
 Meso

 Macro
Smallest level of analysis of social networks. It explains that a social
network typically starts with an individual.
4 Levels of Micro
 Dyadic Level – social relationship starts with two individuals.

 Triadic Level – social relationship starts with three individuals.


 Actor Level – the smallest unit of analysis in a social network is an
individual in their social setting.
 Subset Level – may focus on distance and reachability, cliques,
cohesive subgroups, or other group actions or behavior.
Begins with a population size that falls between the micro– and
macro– levels
Examples:
 Organizations – group of people that has distributive task for a
collective goal.
 Scale Free Networks – a scale-free network is a network whose
degree distribution follows a power law, at least asymptotically In
network theory a scale-free ideal network is a random network with
a degree distribution that unravels the size distribution of social
groups.
Analyzes generally, trace the outcomes of interactions, such as
economic or other resource transfer interactions over a large
population.
Examples:
 Nations

 Economies
Group 3
KINSHIP – refers to a human relationship that is a person’s
relationship by blood or marriage to another person or
others.

A. KINSHIP BY BLOOD
- Refers to relationship by decent, that is, the relationship that
arises in one’s group of origin (Descent Group) or that which refers to
genetic relatedness.
A. KINSHIP BY BLOOD
- Refers to relationship by decent, that is, the relationship that
arises in one’s group of origin (Descent Group) or that which refers to
genetic relatedness.
Kinds of Kindship by Blood: