11/20/2010

` ` `

Characteristics Types A NEATS Analysis
Neurobiology Executive function Attachment Trauma Self-regulation

Jane F. Gilgun, Ph.D., LICSW School of Social Work University of Minnesota, Twin Cities November 2010 `

Case Planning

`

difficulties in relating to other people in reciprocal, empathic ways, difficulties communicating through language, and restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests.

`

More than two-thirds have co-occurring intellectual disabilities Others have normal or high intellectual functioning Many have stereotypies Many have sensory issues Difficulties with executive function & selfregulation

`

`

`

` ` `

` ` ` ` ` `

Neurobiology
ASD are classified as neurodevelopmental condition The earlier the identification the better many different parts of the brain implicated:
x the cerebellum, x the frontal lobes, x mirror neurons, x hippocampus, and amygdala, among others.

High functioning autism (HFA)
(Asperger¶s)²category on its way out

Autism Rett¶s disorder Childhood disintegrative disorder, and Pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PPD NOS)

1

11/20/2010

`

judgment, planning, anticipation of consequences, and problemsolving

`

Same percentages of secure attachments Signs are subtle Characteristics of autism complicate attachments Parents require support & education

`

`

`

`

`

`

Unattended trauma
likely to complicate children¶s ASD symptoms and make additional contributions to difficulties with EF and self-regulation

`

Passivity and/or reactivity Sensory issues may contribute to reactivity Repetitive movements may be attempts at selfsoothing Foundations appear to be neurological Modifiable through experience

`

`

`

`

hen ay as a pre-schooler, he had major tantrums hen his parents as ed him to stop an activity, such as lining up his toy cars, and come to dinner. s he gre older, such reactivity diminished considerably, but he continued to experience agitation in ma ing transitions from one activity to another.
¢ £   ¡ ¢ ¢ £

`

lear expectations
Tabl anner er nal abit : no i ing nose, et . onduct in stores Self-care: giene, care of belongings
¦ § ¨ © ¨   ¨    

` ` ` `

Explain ich behaviors are ok Praise for accomplishment of tasks Structured schedule each day Structured games ith clear rules 


¥   

¤

Simon Says, Parchesee 

2

11/20/2010

`

Early Intervention Psychoeducation Parental support Sibling support Many other interventions depending upon the situation

`

Coffey, Kenneth M., & S. John Obringer (2004). A case study on autism: School accommodations and inclusive settings. Education, 124 (4), 632640. Dawson, Geraldine (2008). Early behavioral intervention, brain plasticity, and autism spectrum disorder. Development and psychopathology, 20, 775-803.

`

`

`

Gilgun, Jane F. (2010). The NEATS: A child & family assessment. http://www.amazon.com/NEATS-Child-Family-Assessmentebook/dp/B0026L7DJW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&s=digitaltext&qid=1290256366&sr=8-1

Gilgun, Jane F. (2010). A NEATS analysis of ASD http://www.scribd.com/doc/22990351/A-NEATSAnalysis-of-Autism-Spectrum-Disorders Koren-Karie, N., Oppenheim, D., Dolev, S., & Yirmiya, N. (2009). Mothers of securely attachedchildren with autism spectrum disorder are more sensitive than mothers of insecurely attached children. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 50(5), 643-650.

Koren-Karie, N., Oppenheim, D., Dolev, S., & Yirmiya, N. (2009). Mothers of securely attachedchildren with autism spectrum disorder are more sensitive than mothers of insecurely attached children. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 50(5), 643-650.

3

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful