Adapted from and based on the work of Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

By the end of this workshop, you should be able to: 1. Explain the research principles underlying Understanding by Design (UbD). 2. Describe and facilitate six ways your students can demonstrate understanding, rather than just knowledge-recall learning. 3. Apply the principles of backward design to your professional role(s), including designing UbD units.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ How do you define the term ³understanding´? ‡ Reflect on your initial definition as you participate in the next two warm-up activity. ‡ What are the various aspects of understanding that they requires you to use?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

If the day before the day before yesterday were Tuesday« What will be the day after the day after tomorrow?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ IF Tuesday= day (1) before the day (2) before
(3). yesterday (3)

‡ Then, today must be three days after Tuesday.
(Tuesday day before the day before yesterday, Wednesday day before yesterday, Thursday yesterday ) SO, today must be Friday.

‡ Then, tomorrow must be Saturday Saturday. ‡ Therefore, the day after the day after tomorrow must be Monday.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Tuesday=day before the day before yesterday. Tuesday Wednesday=the day before yesterday. Wednesday Thursday=yesterday Thursday Friday=TODAY Friday Saturday=tomorrow Saturday Sunday=the day after tomorrow Sunday Monday=the day after the day after tomorrow Monday

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

How many buses does the army need to transport 1,128 soldiers if each bus holds 36 soldiers?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ 31 buses, remainder 12

-remainder 12

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

What¶s so important about understanding? Why should we be concerned with it?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ In your opinion, what does it mean for students to be ³engaged´ in learning? ‡ Is there a time you can remember when as a student, you were actively engaged in the learning process?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

How Can We Promote Student Understanding, Rather than Just Knowing/Doing ?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Why are the best curriculum designs backward? ‡ What is good design? How does UbD support effective curriculum design? ‡ How does continuous improvement apply to curriculum design?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Why teach for understanding? ‡ How will we know students really understand? ‡ What is the difference between understanding and knowing?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

2)When was a time you made 1)Who was the most significant progress/ effective teacher you ever improvement as a learner? had? What made What was it that made that him/her so? possible? ‡ Share examples, then generalize: the best teachers ‡ Share examples, then generalize: the greatest learning happens when

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

Upfront explicit goals and performance requirements Models and modeling provided The bigger picture, the why , is made clear Working back and forth from whole to part A genuine challenge/problem frames the work that stretches youreal, meaningful tasks Work culminates in real or realistic application Trial and error, reflection and adjustment are needed and expected Constant helpful feedback opportunities Safe environment for trying out, getting feedback, adjusting Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Too many students learn without thinking
± Instruction has become an activity in repeating the teacher

‡ Most test questions are recall
± Where s the deeper thinking?

‡ The Course is NOT
± The textbook: that s a resource ± The activities: these are steps ± The content: this is to be mastered

‡ There is a BIG difference between just knowing and really understanding
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ A framework that synthesizes researchbased best practices in curriculum, assessment, and instruction that promote the learning process. ‡ A language that educators can use to describe and analyze the best ways to promote student understanding, rather than just knowledge/recall.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ It is not a program. ‡ It is not one more thing for you to ³have to do.´ ‡ It does not include anything that hasn¶t been used by master teachers throughout the centuries.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Integrating curriculum, instruction, and assessment within a unit of study in any discipline ‡ A unit design template for beginning with the end in mind ‡ A way to enhance meaningful understanding and transfer of learning.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ In even our best students and their work, we see frequent
± Amnesia ± Misunderstandings ± Rigid knowledge, no transfer of learning

Does this sound familiar?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ What is good design?
± Best done backward from the desired result

‡ What is understanding?
± Transfer of knowledge- long term goal and key evidence of understanding ± Use of Big Ideas to focus the work along with the transfer tasks
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ The use of knowledge and skills (acquired in earlier context) in a new context. It occurs when a person s learning in one situation influences that person s learning and performance in other situations.

‡ Transferability is Understanding ± Understanding reveals itself as transfer: an appropriate and affective use of knowledge and skill, on one s own; using good judgment, with minimal cues and prompting, in various important situations, about which content is needed when and why.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

24

25

26

I. Digital-Age Literacy: DigitalScientific, mathematical, and technological literacies; visual and information literacies, and cultural literacy and global awareness

III. Effective Communication:
Teaming, collaboration, and interpersonal skills; personal and social responsibility; interactive communication skills

II.Inventive Thinking:
Adaptability/ability to handle complexity; curiosity, creativity, and risk-taking; and higher-order thinking and sound reasoning

IV. High Productivity:
Ability to prioritize, plan, and manage for results; effective use of real-world tools; and ability to create relevant, high-quality products

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ The following slides will take you through how to construct a unit, using the three stages of backward design ‡ So, as you read, think of a unit that you currently teach or would like to teach. ‡ As we go, consider how your unit would fit in to the three stages.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, MEd
Altamira Intenationl School

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Identify Desired Results 2. Determine Acceptable Evidence 3. Plan Learning Experiences

What is it that I want the students to understand and know and be able to do? How will I know that they know what I want them to know? What do I need to do in the classroom to prepare them for the assessment?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

G U Q L

K

S

T

OE

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

According to Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, the best curriculum and instructional designs are backwards : a. Stage One: Determining Desired Results One:

Two: b. Stage Two: Assessing Results Three: c. Stage Three: Designing Instructional Activities

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Stage One: Identify Desired Results:
a. b. c. a. b. Content Standards Enduring Understandings & Essential Questions Enabling Knowledge Objectives Use a Photo Album, Not Snapshot, Approach Integrate Tests, Quizzes, Reflections and Self-Evaluations with Academic Prompts and Projects

‡ Stage Two: Assess Desired Results:

‡ Stage Three: Design Teaching and Learning Activities to Promote Desired Results:
a. b. W.H.E.R.E.T.O. Design Principles Organizing Learning So That Students Move Toward Independent Application and Deep Understanding Using Research-Based Strategies

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ In order to begin, we must start at the end:
± Clarify results and evidence of them before designing lessons.

‡ UbD is a way of thinking more carefully about design; it is NOT a program. ‡ Thinking like an assessor (not only an activity designer) is key to effective design ‡ The work is only coverage or nice activity unless focused on questions and big ideas, related to the Standards
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Acquire

Make Meaning

Learning for Understanding Effective Crucial to Instruction balance to get the

& sequence right!
Transfer
35

Unit Title: You Are What You Eat

Grade Level: 5th

Subject/Topic Areas: Health and Nutrition Key Words: nutrition, health, wellness, balanced diet, food pyramid Designed by: Bob James School: Cheshire Cat Elementary Time Frame: 3 Weeks

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Brief Summary of Unit(including curricular context and unit goals) In this introductory unit of the health education course, students will learn about human nutritional needs, the food groups, the nutritional benefits of various foods, the USDA Food Pyramid guidelines, and health problems associated with poor nutrition. They will design an illustrated nutrition brochure to teach younger children about the importance of good nutrition for healthy living, work in cooperative groups to analyze a hypothetical family s diet and recommend ways to improve their nutritional value, and conduct research on health problems resulting from poor eating habits.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

UbD big idea Backward Design Transfer as goal Understanding via Big Ideas Meaningful Learning

Why is this important?
Plans need to be well aligned to be effective The essence of understanding and the point of schooling How transfer occurs; creates connections in learning This engages and invites students

If not
Twin sins: Aimless activity and coverage Students fail to apply learning Fragmented learning; more difficult, less engaging Plans need to be well aligned to be effective

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

How do we know when we really understand something?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Are knowing and understanding the same? ‡ Can you know something and not understand it? Explain. ‡ What is the evidence of understanding something?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

What Does the Research Tell Us About How Schools Can Promote Student Understanding?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Knowledge: look it up somewhere. ‡ Understanding derived by you. ‡ Knowledge a set of established not controversial facts. ‡ Understanding an unobvious and important judgment about what the facts mean.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. THINK of a time when you moved from knowing about or being able to do something²to understanding it. 2. PAIR: Describe that time to another participant. 3. SHARE: What are the behaviors and attitudes common to the experiences you described?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Remembering: can the student recall or remember the information? define, duplicate, list, memorize, recall, repeat, reproduce,state Understanding: can the student explain ideas or concepts? classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify, locate, recognize, report, select, translate, paraphrase Applying: can the student use the information in a new way? choose, demonstrate, dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, operate, schedule, sketch, solve, use, write. Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Analyzing: can the student distinguish between the different parts? appraise, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, examine, experiment, question, test. Evaluating: can the student justify a stand or decision? appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, support, value, evaluate Creating: can the student create new product or point of view? assemble, construct, create, design, develop, formulate, write. Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Knowing as a state of possession have the information.

you

‡ Understanding enables one to go beyond the information given to do something with the information.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Facts 
Discrete pieces

Concepts
organizing or categorizing things that have something in common Example: 
Ways of

Principles 
Ideas and deeper

of information believed to be true May typically fall within topics Example: Westward Movement 
Early American settlers

understandings that give meaning to the concepts (essential understandings, generalizations, "big ideas ) Concept of migration is a way of viewing Westward Example:
to meet a variety of needs" "Migration may lead to enhanced opportunity or greater freedom." 
"People migrate

migrated to the west. Many settlers traveled in wagon trains.

Movement  ...a way of organizing facts about the settlers' experiences

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

I want students to understand The US Constitution

I want students to understand THAT The US Constitution was a solution based on compromise to real and pressing problems and disagreements in government They were a brilliant balance and limit of powers.

(this is content!) The three branches of US government

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Explanation ‡ Interpretation ‡ Application

‡ Analysis of Perspectives ‡ Empathy ‡ Self-Knowledge

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ ____________: Backing up ____________: ‡ ___________: Analyzing ___________: claims and assertions with differing points of view about evidence. a topic or issue. ‡ ____________ : Drawing ‡ ___________: Demonstrating ___________: inferences and generating the ability to walk in another s something new from them. shoes. ‡ ____________: ____________:Using ‡ ____________: Assessing and ____________: knowledge and skills in a evaluating one s own thinking new or unanticipated setting and learning: revising, or situation. rethinking, revisiting, refining.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

With which of the following facets of understanding do your students generally perform well? With which do they have trouble? Why? a. Explanation d. Perspective b. Interpretation e. Empathy c. Application f. Self-Knowledge SelfPriscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. How would you describe the six facets of understanding to a colleague who is not present? 2. Create at least three ³enabling knowledge´ objectives using some of the six facets verbs.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

EXPLANATION

SELFSELF-KNOWLEDGE

Develop an illustrated brochure to explain the principles and practices of healthy eating to younger students.

INTERPRETATION APPLICATION

Reflect on their own eating habits and evaluate the extent to which they are eating healthy.

Six Facets of Understanding
Investigate healthy eating from the perspective of different regions and cultures.

1. Analyze a hypothetical family´s diet for nutritional balance. 2. Develop a menu for meals and snacks for an upcoming three day trip to the outdoor education camp.

Modify their eating habits for two days to have a taste of the experience of people wiho must restrict their diets because of specific conditions.
EMPATHY

PERSPECTIVE

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Identify Desired Results 2. Determine Acceptable Evidence 3. Plan Learning Experiences

What is it that I want the students to understand and know and be able to do? How will I know that they know what I want them to know? What do I need to do in the classroom to prepare them for the assessment?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

St g 11Established Goals: U dersta di gs:
St e ts ill erst t t

sir
Ess tial Q

s lts
G sti s: Q S

Students will know

K

Students will be able to

St g
Performance Tasks:

- ss ss
T

t Evi

c
OE

Other Evidence:

Stage 3- Learning Plan 3Learning Activities: L

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ What goal am I addressing? ‡ What s the point? ‡ How does this fit into the content standards? ‡ What should they come away having learned? ‡ What is the bigger purpose? ‡ Answer: Consider BIG IDEAS
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Content Standards: i.e., what all students should be
able to know, do, and understand? ‡ Performance Standards: i.e., levels of competency expected of all students at key points in their educational development? ‡ Benchmark Assessments: i.e., ways in which students will be assessed at key points in their development to ensure they are mastering identified performance standards in order to show progress relative to long-range content standards?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement? ³Standards have to be interpreted and µunpacked¶ by educators. They can¶t just be µpasted on the board.¶´
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Robert Marzano (McRel): ³If teachers are expected to get students to learn all of the [K-12] standards identified by their district, on average we need to expand students¶ time in school by a minimum of 6,000 hours.´

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Marzano, and others report a test preparation paradox:
We seem to feel the obligation to ³cover´ and ³touch on´ lots of things in case they are ³on the test.´ Results confirm, however, that superficial coverage of material causes poorer, not better, test results. better,

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ ³What an extensive research literature now documents is that an ordinary degree of understanding is routinely missing in many, perhaps most students. If, when the circumstances of testing are slightly altered, the sought-after competence can no longer be documented, then understanding²in any reasonable sense of the term²has simply not been achieved.´
Howard Gardner, The Unschooled Mind

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

In light of the need for standards to be ³unpacked,´ how can we build consensus about what all students should understand (not just know and do) so that they can see the universal issues, patterns, and significance of what they are studying?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results
Standard 6 - Students will understand essential concepts about nutrition and diet. 6, a -Students will use an understanding of nutrition to plan appropriate diets for themselves and others. 6, c -Students will understand one s own eating patterns and ways in which these patterns may be improved.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Stage 1- Desired Results
Established Goals: Understandings:
Students will understand that

G U K
Essential uestions: Students will be able to
OE

Q
S S

Students will know

Stage 2- Assessment Evidence
Performance Tasks:

T

Other Evidence:

Stage 3- Learning Plan
Learning Activities:

L Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

What are BIG IDEAS (Think CONCEPTS) IDEAS? ‡ Core idea at the heart of the discipline ‡ Enduring: has lasting, universal value ‡ Transferable to other topics/disciplines ‡ Connective of facts and skills ‡ Requires un-converage or unpacking

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Test your ideas against Stage 1 Design Standards and revise as needed

G
Unpack the Goals (e.g. content standards) to derive the big ideas, key knowledge and skills

K S
Identify key Knowledge and Skills

STAGE 1
Consider possible misunderstandings

Identify the big ideas

Q U
Frame the big ideas as specific Understandings ( the student will understand THAT ) Select and develop Essential Questions to guide inquiry into the big ideas

inexperienced person?  Does it yield optimal depth and breadth of insight into the subject?  Do you have to dig deep to really understand its meanings and implications even if you have a surface grasp of it?  Is it (therefore) prone to misunderstanding as well as disagreement?  Are you likely to change your mind about its meaning and importance over a lifetime?  Does it reflect the core ideas as judged by experts? Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School 

Does it have many layers and nuances, not obvious to the naïve or

The understandings to be developed in this unit
elements of good nutrition
Why do foods that are good for you taste bad?

Will an apple a day keep the doctor away? What would happen if you only ate junk food?

Why do foods that are good for you taste bad?

?
What is a balanced diet? Altamira International School

What is healthy eating?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed

‡ Big Ideas: interdependence, heroism, patterns and systems, investigation ‡ Enduring Understandings: All great writing is rewriting. Science can help us reveal the structural patterns and processes that shape and define our physical universe. ‡ Essential Questions: Is war inevitable? How can we determine what an author means? To what extent is mathematics a language?²How can we learn to ³speak it with fluency and mastery? Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1.

Big ideas are significant and recurring concepts, principles, theories, and processes that represent essential focal points or ³conceptual lenses´ for prioritizing content. Through the identification of big ideas, we can find ways to organize discrete curriculum elements such as facts, skills, and activities. They are powerful because they embody transferable ideas applicable to other settings, situations, and content areas. They engage students in the process of ³uncoverage,´ discovering meaning, drawing significant inferences, and enhancing the authenticity of learning experiences.

2.

3. 4.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Concepts Equivalent Fractions Adaptation Problems
Deforestation of the rain forests The technology gap 

Themes The American Dream Ethical citizenship Challenges
Surviving the harsh and dangerous frontier life Prospering in a global economy 

Issues/Debates
Homeland Security Creationism vs. Evolution 

Processes
Historiography Scientific inquiry 

Theories 

Paradoxes
Poverty in the Wealthiest Nation in the World One person s healthiest diet may be another s least healthy. 


Assumptions/ Perspectives
We are experiencing a condition of global warming. We need to go back to the basics in education.

The Theory of Relativity Natural Selection

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Change Abundance Freedom Migration Symbols Conflict Balance

Justice Charity Interaction Patterns Diversity Cycles Perspective

Exploration Environment Communication Power Culture Fairness Friendship

What else can you think of?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Understandings 
What insights will students take away about the meanings of the content via Big Ideas? Understandings summarize the desired insights we want the students to realize about the Big Ideas Understandings connect the dots; they tell us what our knowledge means and make sense of facts and skills.

Essential uestions 
Important questions that will reoccur throughout our lives Helps students make sense of Big Ideas through questioning and then making decisions. Engages and motivates.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Standards need to be interpreted and ³unpacked.´ unpacked.´ 2. Staff members need to determine: a. Outer Circle: What is worth being familiar with? b. Middle Circle: What should all students know and be able to do? c. Center Circle: What are the enduring understandings students should explore and acquire?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

For a group of tenth-grade World History students, how would you rank each of these: ‡ The day and year the Magna Carta was signed« ‡ The historical significance of the Magna Carta« ‡ The enduring influence of significant political documents throughout the history of world civilization«

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Identify the years in which 2. Use the Periodic Table to Mark Twain was born and died. identify the atomic weights of carbon, oxygen, and helium. (English, Grade 8) (Chemistry, Grade 11) 4. Explain how we can use the relationships between sounds and letters to make sense of text. (Reading, Grade 1) 7. Describe eating patterns and menus from previous historical eras. (Health, Grade 4) 5. Apply the habits of mind used by scientists to engage in scientific inquiry. (Science, Grade 5) 8. Identify key figures who contributed to the development of modern statistics. (College-Level Intro. to Statistics Course)

3. Describe how a bill becomes law at state and national levels. (Civics, Grade 9)

6. Interpret how a primary source document reflects political bias on the part of an author. (U.S. History, Grade 8) 9. Trace universal patterns, themes, and motifs common to art through the ages. (Humanities, Grade 12)

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

How can you use the UBD three-circle curriculum audit to ³unpack´ your standards?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

What concepts should be students be familiar with

Worth Being Familiar With

Important to Know and Do

What important knowledge and skills must students have for mastery

Anchors the unit; Why is this topic worth studying

Enduring Understanding

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Wort i g fa iliar it

I porta t to do a d k ow

Familiar: ‡ General eating patterns and menus from the past ‡ Different conditions requiring dietary restrictions Important: ‡ Types of food in each of the food groups and their nutritional value ‡ The USDA Food Pyramid guidelines ‡ Nutritional information on food labels and how to interpret

Big Id as a d Und rstandings

Big Ideas: ‡ Balanced Diet ‡ Nutritional Needs Understandings: The students will understand that ‡ You are what you eat. Your diet affects you health, appearance and performance. ‡ People have different dietary needs based on age, activity level, weight and various health considerations.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. 2. 3.

Statements or declarations of understandings comprised of two or more big ideas. Framed as universal generalizations²the ³moral´ or essence of the curriculum story. Help students to ³uncover´ significant aspects of the curriculum that are not obvious or may be counterintuitive or easily misunderstood. Formed by completing the statement: Students will understand THAT:««

4.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Numbers are abstract concepts that enable us to represent concrete quantities, sequences, and rates. 2. Democratic governments struggle to balance the rights of individuals with the common good. 3. The form in which authors write shapes how they address both their audience and their purpose(s). 4. Scientists use observation and statistical analysis to uncover and analyze patterns in nature. 5. As technologies change, our views of nature and our world shift and redefine themselves. 6. Dance is a language through which the choreographer and dancer use shape, space, timing, and energy to communicate to their audience.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Students will understand that . . .
A balanced diet contributes to physical and mental health. The USDA Food Pyramid presents relative guidelines for nutrition. Dietary requirements vary for individuals based on age, activity level, weight,and overall health. Healthful living requires an individual to act on available information about good nutrition even if it means breaking comfortable habits.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Stage 1- Desired Results 1Established Goal: Understandings: Students will know U K Essential uestions: Students will be able to
Students will understand that

G Q S

Stage 2- Assessment Evidence 2Performance Tasks: T Other Evidence: OE

Stage 3- Learning Plan 3Learning Activities: L

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Are interpretive, i.e., have no single ³right answer. ‡ Provoke and sustain student inquiry, while focusing learning and final performances. ‡ Address conceptual or philosophical foundations of a discipline/ content area. ‡ Raise other important questions. ‡ Naturally and appropriately occur. ‡ Stimulate vital, ongoing rethinking of big ideas, assumptions, and prior lessons.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Essential questions vary according to their scope and level of generalization. ‡ An overarching essential question can apply to multiple points during a student¶s education; the most overarching can also apply to multiple content areas. ‡ A topical essential question is unit or time-specific and generally applies to a specific unit within the student¶s course of study.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Overarching
‡ How do effective writers hook and hold their readers? ‡ How do organisms survive in harsh or changing environments?

Topical
‡ How do great mystery writers hook and hold their readers? ‡ How do animals and plants survive in the desert?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Avoid questions that have a single correct answer or a range of correct answers: e.g., What makes fractions equivalent? What are the major characteristics of Romantic poetry? ‡ Avoid merely ³rephrasing´ lesson objectives as questions: How can we edit for subject-verb agreement? How can we describe the parts of a cell? How can we apply the steps in the scientific method? ‡ Avoid emphasizing overly obscure or subsidiary aspects of the curriculum as a basis for essential questions: How did Emerson¶s family history contribute to his ideas about Transcendentalism? How did Darwin¶s Voyage of the Beagle shape his views about natural selection? ‡ Avoid excessively vague Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed Why is Priscilla or unfocused questions: literature important?Altamira International School States changed? How has the United

1. What are the differences between a democracy and a monarchy? 2. What were the major causes of the American Civil War? 3. Why is mathematics important? 4. How can we create a personal fitness plan? 5. How do Socrates and Euripides differ in their use of the chorus?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1.Determine the big ideas in your enduring understandings. 2.Decide which of the big ideas you wish your students to explore and debate. 3.Use how, why, or to what extent to reframe your big ideas as questions: ‡ How=process ‡ Why=cause and effect ‡ To what extent=matters of degree or kind
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

What is healthful eating? Are you a heathful eater? How would you know? How could a healthy diet for one person be unhealthy for another? Why are there so many health problems caused by poor eating despite all of the available information?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Stage 1- Desired Results 1Established Goals: Understandings: Students will know U K
Essential Questions: Students will be able to«
Students will understand that

G
Q S

Stage 2- Assessment Evidence 2Performance Tasks: T
Other Evidence: OE

Stage 3- Learning Plan 3Learning Activities: L

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Stage 1- Desired Results 1Established Goals: Understandings: Students will know U K Essential uestions: Students will be able to
Students will understand that

G Q S

Stage 2- Assessment Evidence 2Performance Tasks: T Other Evidence: OE

Stage 3- Learning Plan 3Learning Activities: L

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

Declarative (Know) Procedural (Do) Facts ‡ Skills Concepts ‡ Procedures Generalizations ‡ Processes Theories Rules Principles
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Knowledge
Vocabulary Terminology Definitions Key factual information Formulas Technologies Critical details Important events and people Sequence and timelines

Skills
Basic- decoding, arithmetic, computation Communication- listening, writing, speaking 21st Century Literacies Thinking- comparison, inference, analysis, interpretation Research, inquiry, investigation Study- note taking Interpersonal- group skills

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Knowledge includes Vocabulary/terminology Definitions Key factual information Critical details Important events and people Sequence/timeline These questions HAVE a correct answer!

Skills include Basic skills Communication skills Research/inquiry/ investigation skills Thinking skills (problemsolving, decision making) Study skills Interpersonal or group collaboration skills

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Facts: 1776; Annapolis is the capital of Maryland; Lyndon Johnson succeeded John F. Kennedy. ‡ Concepts: interdependence; scientific method; equivalent fractions; grammar and usage ‡ Generalizations: Tragic heroes frequently suffer because of a failure to recognize an internal character defect; Technology changes frequently produce social and cultural changes. ‡ Theories: Einstein¶s Theory of Relativity; Natural Selection ‡ Rules: The Pythagorean Theorem; rules for pronouncing sound-symbol combinations in English ‡ Principles: Newton¶s Laws; the Commutative Principle

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Skill: Focus a microscope; Decode the meaning of a word using a context cue. ‡ Procedure: Prepare and analyze a slide specimen; Summarize the main idea of a paragraph or passage. ‡ Process: Collect a variety of leaf specimens and compare their structures using a microscope; Trace the development of an author¶s theme in a work of literature.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Students will know:
key terms - protein, fat, calorie, carbohydrate, cholesterol, etc. types of foods in each food group & their nutritional values. the USDA Pyramid guidelines. variables infl uencing nutritional needs. general health problems caused by poor nutrition.

Students will be able to:
Read and interpret nutrition Information on food labels. Analyze diets for nutritional value. Plan balanced diets for themselves and others

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ The Six Facets: explain, interpret, apply, analyze
perspectives, express empathy, demonstrate self-knowledge and meta-cognitive awareness

‡ Know: facts, concepts, generalizations, rules and
principles

‡ Do: skills, procedures, processes
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Students will be able to:
1. 2. Explain the significance of the following facts about the American Civil War. Interpret the meaning of and apply the following concepts to the analysis of cause and effect patterns in labs focusing on chemical and physical changes in matter. Analyze and explain the origins of conflicting perspectives about the Kennedy assassination. Express empathy for the characters by participating in a roleplay or simulation of events from the novel.

3. 4.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. What are the four key elements of Stage One in the backward-design process? 2. How does each element relate to the three-circle audit process?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

If you were asking questions on the left side of the last slide, you re ready to design some assessment evidence!

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Identify Desired Results 2. Determine Acceptable Evidence 3. Plan Learning Experiences

What is it that I want the students to understand and know and be able to do? How will I know that they know what I want them to know? What do I need to do in the classroom to prepare them for the assessment?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Stage 1- Desired Results 1Established Goals: Understandings: Students will know U K Essential uestions: Students will be able to
Students will understand that

G Q S

Stage 2- Assessment Evidence 2Performance Tasks: T Other Evidence: OE

Stage 3- Learning Plan 3Learning Activities: L

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ This is where UbD departs from conventional unit design and planning. ‡ Before we plan the activities and lessons, we must plan the assessment. ‡ What then logically follows is an orderly progression of activities, specifically designed to meet their target.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Understanding develops as a result of ongoing inquiry. ‡ Think of effective assessment like a scrapbook of mementos and pictures, rather than a single snapshot. ‡ Gather lots of informal evidence along the way in a variety of formats! ‡ Use the continuum on the next slide as a guide.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Think of anchoring your unit with a performance task. But use the Other Evidence along the way. (i.e. Don t throw out all your old quizzes!)

Other evidence Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Informal checks for understanding

Tests and uizzes

Academic Prompts

Performance Tasks

‡Informal checks for understanding- ongoing assessments such as questioning, observations, dialogue, examining work, think alouds ‡Tests and uizzes- simple, content focused items ‡Academic Prompts- open ended questions, problems that require students to think critically, not just recall knowledge, and to prepare a specific academic response, product or performance ‡Performance Tasks- complex challenges that mirror the issues and problems faced by adults, ranging from short-term to long term tasks, multistaged projects, they yield one or more tangible products and performances.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Contextualize it to a real-world situation. ‡ Require students to use judgment and innovation. ‡ Call for exploration of the subject like a professional in the field. ‡ Replicate challenging situations in which people are truly tested in life and work. ‡ Compel students to use a repertoire of knowledge and skill to negotiate a task ‡ Allow opportunities to rehearse, practice, consult resources, get feedback, and refine performance. ‡ Use the Six Facets of Understanding
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Use these when generating ideas for Performance Tasks!
When we truly understand, we 1. Can Explain (generalize, connect, provide examples) 2. Can Interpret (tell accessible stories, provide dimension) 3. Can Apply (use what we know in real contexts) 4. Have perspective (see points of views through critical eyes) 5. Can Empathize (walk in another s shoes, value what others do) 6. Have Self-knowledge (meta-cognitive awareness, know what we don t know, reflect on meaning of learning and experience)

These are excellent starting points or touchstones for performance tasks!
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Assessments are too often created without carefully considering the evidence needed or only as a means for generating grades. ‡ Instead, consider this: How do we know that the learner
± met the goal through performance? ± got the understandings? ± deeply considered the essential questions?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Assessors ask: 
What would be sufficient and revealing evidence of understanding? Given the goals, what performance tasks must anchor the unit and focus the instructional work? What are the different types of evidence required by Stage 1? Against what criteria will we appropriately consider work and assess levels of quality? Did the assessments reveal and distinguish those who really understood from those who only seemed to? Am I clear on the reasons beyond learner mistakes?

Activity designers ask: 
What would be fun and interesting activities on this topic? What projects might students wish to do on this topic? What tests should I give, based on the content taught? How will I give students a grade and (justify it to their parents)? How well did the activities work? How did the students do on the test?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

How can schools develop and sustain an effective assessment process that reinforces the monitoring the understanding of all learners?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Assessment and instruction are inextricably linked. ‡ The nature of your desired result(s) will determine the type(s) of assessment task you use to monitor student achievement. ‡ When assessing for understanding, more than selected-response test items (true-false, fill in the blank, multiple choice) are required.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School 

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lex, o en-ended, uthentic)««...

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Do you select the appropriate assessment tool or process to assess each desired result? ‡ Do you use a range of assessment tools, rather than just tests and quizzes? ‡ Do you strive for a photo album, not a snapshot, of student performance data? ‡ Does your photo album provide a full portrait of what your students know, do, and understand relative to your desired results?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Do you make use of«
‡ Tests and quizzes that include constructedresponse items? ‡ Reflective assessments (reflective journals, think logs, peer response groups, interviews)? ‡ Academic prompts with a FAT-P (audience, format, topic, purpose) clearly stated? ‡ Culminating performance assessment tasks and projects?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Assessment and instruction are inextricably linked. ‡ The nature of your desired result(s) will determine the type(s) of assessment task you use to monitor student achievement. ‡ When assessing for understanding, more than selected-response test items (true-false, fill in the blank, multiple choice) are required.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Clearly lay out what students should demonstrate, transfer, or apply to show what they understand and can do as a result of the study. ‡ Provide one or more modes of expression. ‡ Lay out clear, precise expectations for high-quality content (e.g., rubrics, scoring guides); steps and behaviors of developing the product; and the nature of the product itself. ‡ Provide support and scaffolding for high-quality student success. ‡ Provide for variations in student readiness, interest, and learning profile. Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Why does UBD recommend a ³photo album´ approach to assessment, rather than just a snapshot? 2. Describe the four UBD ³non- negotiable´ elements of a good assessment photo album.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Require some form of performance by the student within the testing situation. ‡ Involve students in demonstrations of understanding, not just knowledge-recall learning. ‡ Are often written, but can be differentiated to allow for alternative approaches. ‡ Can involve some form of choice by the learner.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Defend or negate the following statement: Those who fail to learn from the past are condemned to repeat it. 2. Examine the solution to the math word problem presented below. Describe an alternative²and more efficient²way of solving it. 3. Observe the following videotape, which highlights elements of a local eco-system. Describe your observations and conclusions about the health of that system.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Encourage students to internalize and apply to themselves and peers significant evaluation standards and criteria. ‡ Engage students in self-evaluation and metacognitive processing. ‡ Ensure that all learners are becoming selfmonitoring and are ³owning the evaluation criteria. Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, adjustment. ‡ Encourage active feedback andM.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Reflective Journal Entries: How well do you understand this passage? What are the main ideas from this lesson? What did this material mean to you? 2. Think Logs: How would you describe the process of classification? How has your approach to problem-solving changed during this unit? 3. Self-Evaluations: Based upon our evaluation criteria, what grade would you give yourself? Why? 4. Peer Response Group Activities: What can you praise about the work? What questions can you pose? What suggestions can you make for polishing the product? 5. Interviews: Tell me about your perceptions of this project. What do you consider to be your strengths and areas in need of improvement?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ A structured performance task that elicits the student¶s creation of a controlled performance or product. ‡ These performances and products should align with criteria expressed in a scoring guide or rubric. ‡ Successful prompts articulate a format, audience, topic/content focus, and purpose.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

FAT-P Think about a time when you were surprised (topic). Write a letter (format) to a friend (audience) in which you describe that experience. Use a logical narrative sequence with concrete sensory details to help your friend understand what this event was like and how you experienced it (purpose).

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

FAT-P

Prompt: Describe two health problems that could arise as a result of poor nutrition and explain how these could be avoided.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

G=real-world goals =realR=real-world role(s) =realA=real-world audience =realS=real-world situation =realP=real-world products and performances =realS=standards for acceptable performance
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

G.R.A.S.P.S. .R.A
You are a member of a team of scientists investigating deforestation of the Amazon rain forest. You are responsible for gathering scientific data (including such visual evidence as photographs) and producing a scientific report in which you summarize current conditions, possible future trends, and their implications for both the Amazon itself and its broader influence on our planet. Your report, sub-committee which you will present to a United Nations sub-committee, should include detailed and fully-supported fullyrecommendations for an action plan which are clear and complete. complete
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Use the G.R.A.S.P.S. design elements to create a powerful culminating performance task or project for a unit you teach.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

What eviden e will show that students understand? Performance Tasks (summary in GRASPS form)
You Are What You Eat- Students create an illustrated brochure to teach younger children about the importance of good nutrition for healthful living. Offer students ideas for breaking bad eating habits. Chow Down- Students develop a three-day menu for meals and snacks for an upcoming Outdoor Education camp experience. They write a letter to the camp director to explain why their menu should be selected (by showing that it meets the USDA Food Pyramid recommendations, yet is tasty enough for students). Include at least one modification for a specific dietary condition (diabetic or vegetarian) or religious consideration.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Other Evidence:

‡Quiz- The food groups and the USDA Food Pyramid ‡Academic Prompt ‡ Skill Check- Interpret nutritional information on food labels

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Other Evidence
Informal Observations/discussions During work on the performance tasks and the camp and the camp menu project. Student Self-Assessment and Reflection: 1.Self-assess brochure, You Are What You Eat. 2.Self-assess the camp menu, Chow Down. 3.Reflect on the extent to which you eat healthy at the end of the unit (compared to the beginning).

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

How can schools and districts promote instructional practices that reinforce the of all learners?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Identify Desired Results 2. Determine Acceptable Evidence 3. Plan Learning Experiences

What is it that I want the students to understand and know and be able to do? How will I know that they know what I want them to know? What do I need to do in the classroom to prepare them for the assessment?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Stage 1- Desired Results 1Established Goals: Understandings: St e ts ill k U K Essential Questions: St e ts ill e le t
Students will understand that

G Q S

Stage 2- Assessment Evidence 2Performance Tasks: T Other Evidence: OE

Stage 3- Learning Plan 3Learning Activities: L

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ W=Where are we going? Why are we going there? In what ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

ways will we be evaluated? H=How will you hook and engage my interest? E=How will you equip me for success? R=How will you help me revise, rethink, refine, and revisit what I am learning? E=How will I self-evaluate and self-express? T=How will you tailor your instruction to meet my individual needs and strengths? O=How will you organize your teaching to maximize understanding for all students?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Articulation of Goals: Where are we going in this unit or course? What are our goals and standards? What resources and learning experiences will help us achieve them? ‡ Communication of Expectations: What is expected of students? What are the key assignments and assessments? How will students demonstrate understanding? What criteria and performance standards will be used for assessment? ‡ Establishment of Relevance and Value: Why is this worth learning? How will this benefit students now and in the future? ‡ Diagnosis: From where are students coming? What prior knowledge, interests, learning styles, and talents do they bring? What misconceptions may exist that must be addressed? Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

Odd facts, anomalies, counterintuitive examples Provocative entry questions Mysteries and engaging anecdotes or stories Challenges Student-friendly problems and issues Experiments and predictions of outcomes Role-plays and simulations activities Sharing personal experiences Allowing students choices and options Establishing emotional connections Humor Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Experiential and Inductive Learning:What experiential or inductive learning will help students to explore the big ideas and essential questions? ‡ Direct Instruction: What information or skills need to be taught explicitly to equip students for successful achievement of desired results? ‡ Homework and Other Out-of-Class Experiences: What homework and other out-of-class experiences are needed to equip students to achieve desired results and complete expected performances? Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Rethink:What big ideas do we want students to rethink? How will your design challenge students to revisit important ideas? ‡ Revise or Refine: What skills need to be practiced or rehearsed? How might student products and performances be improved? ‡ Reflect: How will you encourage students to reflect on their learning experiences and growing understanding? How will you help them to become more meta-cognitive?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

What do you really understand about ««.? What questions and uncertainties do you still have? What was most and least effective in «.? How could you improve «..? How would you describe your strengths and needs in«? What would you do differently next time? What grade or score do you deserve? Why? How does what you¶ve learned connect to other learnings? How have you changed your thinking? How does what you¶ve learned related to your present and future? What follow-up work is needed?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Content: How will you accommodate different knowledge and skill levels? How will you address a variety of learning modalities and preferences? How will you use a range of resource materials? ‡ Process: How will you vary individual and group work? How will you accommodate different learning style preferences and readiness levels? ‡ Product: To what extent will you allow students choices in products for activities and assignments? How will you allow students choices for demonstrating significant understandings? Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Conceptual Organization Along a Developmental Continuum: How will you help students to move from initial concrete experience toward growing levels of conceptual understanding and independent application? ‡ Coverage: What aspects of your unit or program are most appropriately and effectively addressed in linear, teacher-directed, or didactic fashion? ‡ ³Uncoverage´: What is most appropriately and effectively ³uncovered´ in an inductive, inquiry-oriented experiential manner? Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. Begin with an entry question (Can the foods you eat cause zits?) to hook students into considering the effects of nutrition on their lives. M H 2. Introduce the essential questions and discuss the culminating unit performance tasks (Chow Down and Eating Action Plan). M W 3. Note: Key vocabulary terms are introduced as needed by the various learning activities and performance tasks. Students read and discuss relevant selections from the Health textbook to support the learning activities and tasks. As an on-going activity students keep a chart of their daily eating and drinking for later review and evaluation. A E 4. Present concept attainment lesson on the food groups. Then, have students practice categorizing pictures of foods accordingly. M E 5. Introduce the Food Pyramid and identify foods in each group. Students work in groups to develop a poster of the Food Pyramid containing cut-out pictures of foods in each group. Display the posters in the classroom or hallway. A E 6. Give quiz on the Food groups and Food Pyramid (matching format). E E 7. Review and discuss the nutrition brochure from the USDA. Discussion question: Must everyone follow the same diet in order to be healthy? A M R 8. Working in cooperative groups, students analyze a hypothetical family*s diet (deliberately unbalanced) and make recommendations for improved nutrition. Teacher observes and coaches students as they work. M T E2 9. Have groups share their diet analyses and discuss as a class. M E, E2

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

10. Each student designs an illustrated nutrition brochure to teach younger children about the importance of good nutrition for healthy living and the problems associated with poor eating. This activity is completed outside of class. M T E, T 11. Show and discuss the video, Nutrition and You. Discuss the health problems that result from poor nutrition. A R, E-2 12. Students listen to, and question, a guest speaker (nutritionist from the local hospital) about health problems caused by poor nutrition. A E 13. Students respond to written prompt: Describe two health problems that could arise as a result of poor nutrition and explain what changes in eating could help to avoid them. (These are collected and graded by teacher.) A E 14. Teacher models how to read and interpret food label information on nutritional values. Then, have students practice using donated boxes, cans and bottles (empty!). A E-2 15. Students work independently to develop the 3-day camp menu. T E 16. At the conclusion of the unit, students review their completed daily eating chart and self assess the healthfulness of their eating. Have they noticed changes? Improvements? Do they notice changes in how they feel and/or their appearance? M T E-2 , T 17. Students develop a personal eating action plan for healthful eating. These are saved and presented at upcoming student-involved parent conferences. T E-2 18. Conclude the unit with student self evaluation regarding their personal eating habits. Have each student develop a personal action plan for their healthful eating goal. M T E-2, T

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. How is W.H.E.R.E.T.O. the ³blueprint´ for Stage Three learning activities? 2. How would you explain each of the W.H.E.R.E.T.O. elements to a colleague with whom you work?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

«So what can we conclude about schools that promote various dimensions of engaged student learning that result in understanding, not just knowledge-recall learning?

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

‡ Changes in our society necessitating the need to emphasize student engagement. ‡ The need to emphasize student understanding, not just knowledge-recall learning. ‡ The power of a core and conceptually-organized curriculum built upon high expectations for all students. ‡ The necessity of differentiating assessment and instruction. ‡ The power of using research-based instructional practices to promote student engagement.

Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

Nothing personal, but
‡ We all have a few habits that are neither helpful nor in line with Best Practice ± For example, many of us too often
‡ Confuse the textbook with a valid syllabus based on transfer goals ‡ Confuse fun activities with learning ‡ Teach without checking for understanding early and often enough ‡ Test what is easier to test and grade rather than what is most in line with our personal and institutional long-term goals

Nothing personal: Best design characteristics (from 8000+ educators)
± Clear goals and explicit performance requirements ± Models and modeling provided ± A genuine challenge/problem/question frames work that stretches you - real, meaningful tasks ± Lots of focused practice, feedback, and opportunities to use it built in - not over-planned and taught ± Trial and error, reflection and adjustment are expected, encouraged and designed in ± The teacher is more of a facilitator, coach ± There is a safe, supportive environment for risk-taking, trying out new learning ± Designed in variety, choice, and attention to difference ± A good mix of collaboration/solo work ± Immersion, active, hands-on - and earlier than typically done

‡ A commitment to continuous progress ‡ Involvement of all stakeholders in decision-making and problem-solving ‡ Built on a community of inquiry and learning ‡ Ongoing use of collaborative processes, including study groups, inquiry teams, and action research cohorts.
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

1. As you reflect back on the training, what do you consider to be the ³big ideas´ of UBD? 2. What are some possible next steps for implementing what you have learned?
Priscilla Ruiz de Vergara, M.Ed
Altamira International School

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