Start Part IV/IV

Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit
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‡ RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. ‡ BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly.

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‡ Keep an eye out for ³The-Owl´ and raise your hand as soon as you see him.
± He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow

³Hoot, Hoot´ ³Good Luck!´

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New

Biogeochemical Cycle: The Nitrogen Cycle.

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‡ What will be studying a whole lot of in the next few days?

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‡ What will be studying a whole lot of in the next few days?

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‡ What will be studying a whole lot of in the next few days?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ What will be studying a whole lot of in the next few days?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ What will be studying a whole lot of in the next few days?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ What will be studying a whole lot of in the next few days?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ What will be studying a whole lot of in the next few days?

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‡ What will be studying a whole lot of in the next few days?

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‡ Yes, We will be studying concepts that have a lot to do with waste.

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Nitrogen

Cycle: The circulation of

nitrogen.

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‡ Video! The goal will be to understand this video about the nitrogen cycle.
± We will watch it again at the end of class.

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‡ Nitrogen in the atmosphere is N2 gas which is doesn¶t bond well with other molecules.
± Nitrogen forms triple bond with itself.

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‡ When nitrogen is ³fixed´, it¶s bond are split with the other nitrogen. Now it has three arms to make new friends like oxygen.

Bacteria
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‡ Plants can now use this new molecule to get the nitrogen they need to build proteins to grow, repair, and reproduce.

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‡ When plants or animals die, their bonds are broken and they say goodbye.

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‡ When the nitrogen is denitrified, it then bonds with another nitrogen to form inert N2 gas in the atmosphere until the cycle repeats.
We now get to hang out in the atmosphere for a long time.

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‡ All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. ‡ Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N2), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. ‡ But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. ‡ Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as:
± nitrate ions (NO3í) ± ammonia (NH3) ± urea (NH2)2CO

‡ Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. ‡ Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N2), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. ‡ But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. ‡ Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as:
± nitrate ions (NO3í) ± ammonia (NH3) ± urea (NH2)2CO

‡ Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. ‡ Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N2), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. ‡ But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. ‡ Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as:
± nitrate ions (NO3í) ± ammonia (NH3) ± urea (NH2)2CO

‡ Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. ‡ Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N2), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. ‡ But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. ‡ Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as:
± nitrate ions (NO3í) ± ammonia (NH3) ± urea (NH2)2CO

‡ Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. ‡ Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N2), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. ‡ But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. ‡ Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as:
± nitrate ions (NO3í) ± ammonia (NH3) ± urea (NH2)2CO

‡ Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. ‡ Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N2), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. ‡ But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. ‡ Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as:
± nitrate ions (NO3í) ± ammonia (NH3) ± urea (NH2)2CO

‡ Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. ‡ Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N2), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. ‡ But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. ‡ Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as:
± nitrate ions (NO3í) ± ammonia (NH3) ± urea (NH2)2CO

‡ Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air by bacteria. Happens with poor soil management.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air by bacteria. Happens with poor soil management.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air by bacteria. Happens with poor soil management.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air by bacteria. Happens with poor soil management.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air by bacteria. Happens with poor soil management.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air by bacteria. Happens with poor soil management.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ This is an example of poor soil conservation methods which leads to soil nutrient depletion.
± The lost nitrogen in this runoff will be denitrified by bacteria back to the atmosphere .

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‡ This is an example of poor soil conservation methods which leads to soil nutrient depletion.
± The lost nitrogen in this runoff will be denitrified by bacteria back to the atmosphere .

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‡ Manmade fertilizers also put nitrogen into the soil.
± Excess / poor management of nitrogen can result in pollution.

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‡ Activity! Step by step drawing of the Nitrogen Cycle.

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N2

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Lightning converts N2 Gas into other forms

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Lightning converts N2 Gas into other forms
Nitrogen mixes with oxygen and rain / falls to earth.

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Lightning converts N2 Gas into other forms
Nitrogen mixes with oxygen and rain / falls to earth.

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N2

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NO3

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NH3 /NH2

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NO3

NH2

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Air pollution puts nitrogen into air

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‡ Excess free nitrogen in the atmosphere can cause acid rain which damages forests and lakes.

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‡ Nitrogen in atmosphere is inert (N2 Gas)
which is not reactive. (Can¶t use) ± Bacteria on plant roots convert nitrogen in atmosphere into
‡ nitrate ions (NO3í) (NO2-) ‡ ammonia (NH4)

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Nitrogen in atmosphere is inert (N2 Gas)
which is not reactive. (Can¶t use) ± Bacteria on plant roots convert nitrogen in atmosphere into
‡ nitrate ions (NO3í) (NO2-) ‡ ammonia (NH4)

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‡ Nitrogen in atmosphere is inert (N2 Gas)
which is not reactive. (Can¶t use) ± Bacteria on plant roots convert nitrogen in atmosphere into
‡ nitrate ions (NO3í) (NO2-) ‡ ammonia (NH4)

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Plants now have usable nitrogen. ‡ Animals get nitrogen from eating plants. ‡ Animals and plants release nitrogen in waste such as urea (NH2)2CO and death. ‡ Bacteria break down nitrogen and release it back into air as N2 Gas. (Denitrification).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Plants now have usable nitrogen. ‡ Animals get nitrogen from eating plants. ‡ Animals and plants release nitrogen in waste such as urea (NH2)2CO and death. ‡ Bacteria break down nitrogen and release it back into air as N2 Gas. (Denitrification).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Plants now have usable nitrogen. ‡ Animals get nitrogen from eating plants. ‡ Animals and plants release nitrogen in waste such as urea (NH2)2CO and death. ‡ Bacteria break down nitrogen and release it back into air as N2 Gas. (Denitrification).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Plants now have usable nitrogen. ‡ Animals get nitrogen from eating plants. ‡ Animals and plants release nitrogen in waste such as urea (NH2)2CO and death. ‡ Bacteria break down nitrogen and release it back into air as N2 Gas. (Denitrification).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Plants now have usable nitrogen. ‡ Animals get nitrogen from eating plants. ‡ Animals and plants release nitrogen in waste such as urea (NH2)2CO and death. ‡ Bacteria break down nitrogen and release it back into air as N2 Gas. (Denitrification).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere in the game on the next slide:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere in the game on the next slide:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere in the game on the next slide:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere in the game on the next slide:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere in the game on the next slide:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere in the game on the next slide:
± Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. ± Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. ± Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. ± Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Chutes and Ladders, the Nitrogen Fixation game.
± Please play chutes and ladders the nitrogen fixation game until the end of class. ± Record your journey until you reach crop uptake in your journal«..then just play. ± Must make whoooop or weeee sound down chute. ± If you go off the board go back to start. ± If someone lands on you, your denitrified-go back to start.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Video! The nitrogen cycle and ninjas.
± Do you understand any of it now, or is it still to ³Out there´ for any understanding.

Die Nitrogen!

Prepare to be denitrified!

I will turn you into urea!
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‡ Acid Rain is caused by Nitrogen and Sulfur dioxides. Aka ± Air pollution.

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‡ Activity! Acid Rain. ± Draw one of the following on a sheet of paper depending on the number assigned.
‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ 1 Car 2 Frog 3 Fish 4 Pond 5 Mountain 6 Factory 7 Cloud 8 Wind 9 Rain Cloud 10 Snowflake 11 Skull 12 Volcano 13 Dead Fish 14 Pine tree 15 Dead Pine tree 16 Oil underground

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‡ Acid rain: Any form of precipitation that is unusually acidic. Usually around a pH of 5

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‡ Activity! Acid Rain.
± Place each card on the board in a logical manner to represent how Acid Rain forms, travels, falls, and damages ecosystems.

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New

Biogeochemical Cycle: The Phosphorus Cycle.

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Phosphorus

cycle: The biogeochemical cycle that describes the movement of phosphorus through the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.

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‡ Activity! Drawing the Phosphorus Cycle.
± One full page needed.

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Takes millions of years

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Do not Draw

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Importance 
-

of phosphorus

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Important

nutrient for plants and animals.

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Part

of DNA molecule in our cells.

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In

the fats of our cell membrane.

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Part

of our bones and teeth.

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‡ What happens in your fish tank if you don¶t clean it after a long time?

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Area

of focus: Nutrients and Aquatic Systems.

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‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please set up three containers with pond or stream water. ± Have one be control with just water, and then have the next three have increasing amounts of nutriennts / fertilizer. ± Label each one and place near light source.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please sketch what the four containers look like now. ± What does fertilizer do to an aquatic system?

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please sketch what the four containers look like now.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please sketch what the four containers look like now.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please sketch what the four containers look like now.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please sketch what the four containers look like now.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please sketch what the four containers look like now.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please sketch what the four containers look like now.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please sketch what the four containers look like now.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago.
± Please sketch what the four containers look like now.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago. ‡ What does fertilizer do to an aquatic system?

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Experiment from two weeks ago. ‡ What does fertilizer do to an aquatic system? ‡ Answer: The nitrogen and phosphorus caused an increase in plant growth in the containers over time.

Control

Low

Medium

High

‡ Usually, a fish if it isn¶t cleaned become overloaded with algae. This bloom occurs from excess nutrients and sunlight.
± Nutrients include Nitrogen and Phosphorus.

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Draw three Lakes ± Add the appropriate colors and vegetation to each box. Eutrophic Mesotrophic Olgiotrophic

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Draw three Lakes ± Add the appropriate colors and vegetation to each box. Eutrophic Mesotrophic Olgiotrophic

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‡ Oligotrophic
± Describes a lake or river with low productivity.

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Eutrophic

Mesotrophic

Olgiotrophic

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Eutrophic

Mesotrophic

Olgiotrophic

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‡ Mesotrophic
± Production is considered moderate.

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Eutrophic

Mesotrophic

Olgiotrophic

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Eutrophic

Mesotrophic

Olgiotrophic

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‡ Eutrophic ‡ Having concentrations of nutrients optimal or for plant or animal growth. It is used to describe nutrient or soil solutions.

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‡ Eutrophication.

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Please draw the following full page.

Half of a page to a

Don t color yet

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Manure

Fertilizers

Human Waste

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Darn you extra phosphorus and nitrogen Darn you.

‡ How does excess nitrogen and phosphorus enter an aquatic system?
± What type of effects can it have if there is too much?

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Eutrophication. 
-

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Aquatic

plants use Phosphorus and Nitrogen and grow out of control.

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Hoot Hoot Did anybody see me?

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This algae bloom is gross! Get me out of here! 

Plants

then overpopulate and die.

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Bacteria break down dead plants and use oxygen in water (respiration).

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No

oxygen left for fish / other aquatic life and they die.

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No

oxygen left for fish / other aquatic life and they die.

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No

oxygen left for fish / other aquatic life and they die.

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‡ Which side was given phosphorus in this water quality study?

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‡ Answer! No nutrients

Nutrients (N, P)

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‡ Activity 1-10 ± Olgiotrophic, Mesotrophic, or Eutrophic or Eutrophication

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1

2

3 3

4

5

6 6

7

8

9

10

‡ Bonus! Name the movie.

‡ Answers 1-10 ± Olgiotrophic, Mesotrophic, or Eutrophic or Eutrophification

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

1

1 Eutrophic

2

2 Eutrophication

3 3

3 3 Eutrophic

4

4 Eutrophic

5

5 Oligiotrophic

6 6

6 Eutrophication 6

7

7 Meso / Olgiotrophic

8

8 Mesotrophic

9

9 Olgiotrophic

10

10 Eutrophic

‡ Bonus! Name the movie.

‡ Bonus! Name the movie. Happy Gilmore

Hey Happy. Let me tell you about nutrient pollution.

‡ Try Again! Be the first to identify the image beneath the squares.
± Raise you hand if you think you know. You only get one guess.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Surface Run-off

‡ Try Again! Be the first to identify the image beneath the squares.
± Raise you hand if you think you know. You only get one guess.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Respiration

‡ Answer the Following Questions by moving to that corner of the room.

A

B

C

D

A

B
This is the name for all of the nonliving components of the environment. A.) Ecosystem B.) Abiotic C.) Biotic D.) Eutrophic

C

D

A

B
This is the name for all of the nonliving components of the environment. A.) Ecosystem B.) Abiotic C.) Biotic D.) Eutrophic

C

D

A

B
The following is not one of the seven big abiotic factors. A.) Temperature B.) Light C.) Food Web D.) Water

C

D

A

B
The following is not one of the seven big abiotic factors. A.) Temperature B.) Light C.) Food Web D.) Water

C

D

A
All organisms have this when it comes to the abiotic factors. A.) Comprehension B.) Strength C.) Competition D.) Range of Tolerance

B

C

D

A
All organisms have this when it comes to the abiotic factors. A.) Comprehension B.) Strength C.) Competition D.) Range of Tolerance

B

C

D

A

B
Organisms are affected by light in all of the following ways except« A.) Intensity B.) Duration C.) Island Biogeography D.) Type

C

D

A

B
Organisms are affected by light in all of the following ways except« A.) Intensity B.) Duration C.) Island Biogeography D.) Type

C

D

A

B
This is the name for the process that turns Carbon Dioxide and Water into sugars in the presence of sunlight. A.) Photosynthesis B.) Respiration C.) Island Biogeography D.) Denitrification

C

D

A

B
This is the name for the process that turns Carbon Dioxide and Water into sugars in the presence of sunlight. A.) Photosynthesis B.) Respiration C.) Island Biogeography D.) Denitrification

C

D

A

B
This is the name for the directional growth in the response to light in plants. A.) Photosynthesis B.) Photokinesis C.) Phototaxis D.) Phototrophism

C

D

A

B
This is the name for the directional growth in the response to light in plants. A.) Photosynthesis B.) Photokinesis C.) Phototaxis D.) Phototrophism

C

D

A

B
This is the production of light by a living creature« A.) Biology B.) Bioluminescence C.) Bioaccumulation D.) Bi-weekly

C

D

A

B
This is the production of light by a living creature« A.) Biology B.) Bioluminescence C.) Bioaccumulation D.) Bi-weekly

C

D

A

B
This is the ability for an organism to keep it¶s temperature within certain boundaries« A.) Thermometer B.) Cold-Bloodedness C.) Thermoregulation D.) Warm-Bloodedness

C

D

A

B
This is the ability for an organism to keep it¶s temperature within certain boundaries« A.) Thermometer B.) Cold-Bloodedness C.) Thermoregulation D.) Warm-Bloodedness

C

D

A

B
All of the following are physiological adaptations to temperature except.. A.) Goosebumps B.) Teeth Chattering C.) Increased Heart rate D.) Putting on a coat

C

D

A

B
All of the following are physiological adaptations to temperature except.. A.) Goosebumps B.) Teeth Chattering C.) Increased Heart rate D.) Putting on a coat

C

D

A
A.) Hypertension B.) Hypothermia C.) Hyperthermia D.) Hyperactivity

B
This is the name for the decrease in body temperature to a point which normal muscular and brain functions are impaired.

C

D

A
A.) Hypertension B.) Hypothermia C.) Hyperthermia D.) Hyperactivity

B
This is the name for the decrease in body temperature to a point which normal muscular and brain functions are impaired.

C

D

A

B
Plants can disperse pollen or seeds in all of the following ways except« A.) Nutrient Cycling B.) Wind C.) Water D.) Animals

C

D

A

B
Plants can disperse pollen or seeds in all of the following ways except« A.) Nutrient Cycling B.) Wind C.) Water D.) Animals

C

D

A

B
This is the science term for life, earth, chemical cycling. A.) Ecosystem B.) Biogeochemical Cycling C.) Island Biogeography D.) Competition for Resources

C

D

A

B
This is the science term for life, earth, chemical cycling. A.) Ecosystem B.) Biogeochemical Cycling C.) Island Biogeography D.) Competition for Resources

C

D

A

B
The following are all common terms associated with the Hydrologic Cycle. A.) Denitrification B.) Evaporation C.) Condensation D.) Percipiation

C

D

A

B
The following are all common terms associated with the Hydrologic Cycle. A.) Denitrification B.) Evaporation C.) Condensation D.) Percipiation

C

D

A

B
The following are all common terms associated with the Hydrologic Cycle. A.) Denitrification B.) Evaporation C.) Condensation D.) Percipiation

C

D

A

B
The following are all common terms associated with the Hydrologic Cycle. A.) Denitrification B.) Evaporation C.) Condensation D.) Percipiation

C

D

A

B
Which of the following is the correct equation for photosynthesis?

A.) 6CO2 + 6H2O + light energy = C6H12O6 + 6CO2 B.) 6CO2 + H2O + light energy = C6H12O6 + 6O2 C.) 6CO2 + 6H2O + light energy = C6H12O6 + 6O2 D.) 6O2 + 6H2O + light energy = C6H12O6 + 6O2

C

D

A

B
Which of the following is the correct equation for photosynthesis?

A.) 6CO2 + 6H2O + light energy = C6H12O6 + 6CO2 B.) 6CO2 + H2O + light energy = C6H12O6 + 6O2 C.) 6CO2 + 6H2O + light energy = C6H12O6 + 6O2 D.) 6O2 + 6H2O + light energy = C6H12O6 + 6O2

C

D

A

B
Which of the following is the correct equation for respiration?

A.) C6H12O6 + 6CO2 = 6CO2 + 6H2O + released energy. B.) C6H12O6 + 6O2 = 6CO2 + 6O2 + released energy. C.) C6H12O6 + 6O2 = 6CO2 + 6H2O + released energy. D.) C6H12O6 + 6O2 = 6O2 + 6H2O + released energy.

C

D

A

B
Which of the following is the correct equation for respiration?

A.) C6H12O6 + 6CO2 = 6CO2 + 6H2O + released energy. B.) C6H12O6 + 6O2 = 6CO2 + 6O2 + released energy. C.) C6H12O6 + 6O2 = 6CO2 + 6H2O + released energy. D.) C6H12O6 + 6O2 = 6O2 + 6H2O + released energy.

C

D

A

B
The following are all biogeochemical cycles except« A.) Nitrogen Cycle B.) Phosphorus Cycle C.) Carbon Cycle D.) Cyclic Compounding

C

D

A

B
The following are all biogeochemical cycles except« A.) Nitrogen Cycle B.) Phosphorus Cycle C.) Carbon Cycle D.) Cyclic Compounding

C

D

‡ Activity! Jeopardy ± Biogeochemical Cycles Review Game.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ The Ecology: Abiotic Factors Assessment due soon!

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

End Part IV/IV
Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit
Download at www.sciencepowerpoint.com

‡ More Units Available at«

Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and coming soon The Anatomy and Physiology Unit.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

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