Taxonomy and Classification Unit Part III/V

Start Part III / VI of an educational unit about Taxonomy and Classification for students in grades 7-10 Part I: Taxonomy and Classification Part II: Kingdom Monera Part III: Kingdoms Protista and Animalia Part IV: Animalia and Mammals Part V: Kingdom Fungi an Plantae Part VI: Final Recitation Download the Powerpoint version of this video, unit notes, assessments, lab handouts, review games, videos, and much more at www.sciencepowerpoint.com

‡ RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. ‡ BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. ‡ BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Keep an eye out for ³The-Owl´ and raise your hand as soon as you see him.
± He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow

³Hoot, Hoot´ ³Good Luck!´

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New

Area of Focus: Eukarya

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Domain

Eukarya: Have cells with a Eukarya: membrane bound nucleus and membrane bound organelles.

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‡ Which number from the Eukaryotic cell below is the nucleus?

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‡ Answer! Number 2 is the nucleus, number 1 is an organelle called the nucleolus.

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‡ Animals, Plants, and Fungi all evolved from primitive Protists.

‡ Animals, Plants, and Fungi all evolved from primitive Protists. 

New

Area of Focus: Protista

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‡ The name Protista means "the very first", There are thousands and thousands of species.

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‡ The name Protista means "the very first", There are thousands and thousands of species.

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‡ The name Protista means "the very first", There are thousands and thousands of species.

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‡ The name Protista means "the very first", There are thousands and thousands of species.

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Protist: An organism with Eukaryotic Single cell, or colonies.

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Protist: An organism with Eukaryotic Single cell, or colonies. Lacking tissues and eats, makes, or decomposes for food.

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‡ Remember, Protists lack tissues.
± Which specimen below is a protist, and which is an animal?

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Answer! Protists do not have eyes because an eye is made of tissue.

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‡ Which specimen below is a protist, and which is an animal?

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‡ Answer! Protists do not have tissues, so they do not have hearts. Protists

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‡ Which specimen below is a protist, and which is an animal?

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Animal?

Protist

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‡ Is this a protist? Why of why not?

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‡ Answer! No, because the specimen has tissues such as eyes, and some sort of digestive tract.

‡ Is this a Protist?

OhOhYah!

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‡ Answer! No, I don¶t know what this is.

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Plant-like Plant-

Protists (photosynthetic but no roots, stems, or leaves)

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Green

Algae

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The Green Algae
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‡ Spirogyra

‡ Spirogyra 

Brown

Algae

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Red

Algae 

Diatoms 

Diatoms 
Round

shells made of glass.

‡ Diatoms use silicon to make their glass shells using a process called biomineralization.

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‡ Diatoms produce more oxygen for the planet than all of the forests combined.

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‡ Diatoms produce more oxygen for the planet than all of the forests combined.
± About ¼ of all the oxygen on Earth comes from diatoms.

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Go Diatoms

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Dinoflagellates

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Dinoflagellates have two flagella

Red tide 

Euglenoid

‡ Video short! The Plant-like Protists
± http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5ESHXKG BvA&feature=fvsr 

Animal-like Animal-

Protist (move, eat food, some

use sun) 
-

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‡ These Protists are kind of like SWAMP THING. They have some qualities of plants, and other qualities like animals.

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Ameobas

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Flagellates

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Flagellates 

Use flagella for locomotion

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Introducing The New Mascot The Flagellates
Go Flagellates!

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‡ Flagellates
± Use flagella for locomotion

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Sporazoan (parasite)

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‡ The deadly disease malaria is a sporazoan.

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Ciliates 

Cilia

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Cilium

/ Cilia: A hairlike projection from the surface of a cell, and provides locomotion.

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‡ A Paramecium is a ciliate.

‡ Animation of how a cilia works.

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‡ Animation of how many work together in unison.

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‡ Which direction is the ciliate traveling based on the animation below?

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‡ Answer! I am not sure, very little research was available to help me. ?

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‡ We have cilia in our throat to move small particles of food to our stomach.

‡ We have cilia in our throat to move small particles of food to our stomach.

‡ These particle travel in a thin layer of muccous.

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‡ When we have a sore throat, our cilia are covered with mucus. We must cough to get the food and dead cells in or out.

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Fungus-like Fungus-

protists (get energy from decomposing).

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Slime

Mold

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Water Mold

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‡ Review Video before the 50/50 Token Challenge.
± http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsdYOgTbOk

‡ Activity! 50/50 Token Challenge
± If you get the question wrong, you lose your token.

‡ Activity! 50/50 Token Challenge
± If you get the question wrong, you lose your token.

True

‡ Activity! 50/50 Token Challenge
± If you get the question wrong, you lose your token.

True

FALSE

‡ Activity! 50/50 Token Challenge
± If you get the question wrong, you lose your token.

True

FALSE

You have a 1 and 4,194,304 chance of successfully reaching the end by guessing. Do you know your Protists?

‡ This is Brown Algae?

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‡ This is Brown Algae? True

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‡ This person is covered in diatoms?

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‡ This person is covered in diatoms? ‡ False! Green Algae

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‡ This is a Euglenoid?

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‡ This is a Euglenoid? False! Dinoflagellate

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‡ This is a Euglenoid?

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‡ This is a Euglenoid? True

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The one on the right is a ciliate?

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The one on the right is a ciliate? False! Amoeba

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The one on the left is a dinoflagellate?

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The one on the left is a dinoflagellate? False: Ciliate

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‡ This is a picture of a slime mold?

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‡ This is a picture of a slime mold? True

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‡ This is a picture of the red tide?

‡ This is a picture of the red tide? ‡ False: Red Algae

‡ This is a picture of a dinoflagellate?

‡ This is a picture of a dinoflagellate? ‡ False! Amoeba

‡ The picture on the right is a diatom?

‡ The picture on the right is a diatom? True

‡ The picture on the left is a flagellate?

‡ The picture on the left is a flagellate? True

This is an animation of a cilia?

This is an animation of a cilia? False! Flagella

The cilia below are most often found on brown algae?

The cilia below are most often found on brown algae? False! Ciliates

The picture below is yellow algae?

The picture below is yellow algae? False! Water Mold

This is a picture of a slime mold?

This is a picture of a slime mold? True

This is a picture of a Euglenoid?

This is a picture of a Euglenoid? False: Sporazoan

This is a picture of a Euglenoid? False: Sporazoan

This is a picture of spirogyra?

This is a picture of spirogyra? True

Spirogyra is a genus of Green Algae?

Spirogyra is a genus of Green Algae? True

This is an animation of a Euglenoid?

This is an animation of a Euglenoid? True

This is an animation of a Euglenoid?

If I could talk I would tell you that this is the last one.

This is a Protist?

This is a Protist? False (It has tissues)

This is a Protist? False (It has tissues)

‡ Did anyone get them all correct?

‡ Activity! The song option.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! The song option.
± Choose a Protist.

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‡ Activity! The song option.
± Choose a Protist. ± Research that type of Protist.

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‡ Activity! The song option.
± Choose a Protist. ± Research that type of Protist.
‡ What is most important to sing about?

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‡ Activity! The song option.
± Choose a Protist. ± Research that type of Protist.
‡ What is most important to sing about?

± Create a short song to sing to the class that teaches about that Protist.

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‡ Activity! The song option.
± Choose a Protist. ± Research that type of Protist.
‡ What is most important to sing about?

± Create a short song to sing to the class that teaches about that Protist. ± Work with a partner.

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‡ Petition Option

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‡ Petition Option

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‡ Petition Option
± Create a fake sign up sheet using Publisher..

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‡ Petition Option
± Create a fake sign up sheet using Publisher. ± Provide room at bottom for some signatures.

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‡ Petition Option
± Create a fake sign up sheet using Publisher. ± Provide room at bottom for some signatures. ± Needs a visual for the new school mascot.

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‡ Petition Option
± Create a fake sign up sheet using Publisher. ± Provide room at bottom for some signatures. ± Needs a visual for the new school mascot. ± Example on next slide.

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The Amoebas
Place important text about Amoebas in this box. How they move, eat, reproduce.

Create your image of the mascot here, We can give it eyes just for fun. -Use Paint?

Place additional text here, Uses / problems they may cause + additional cool info

Signatures

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New

Area of Focus: Animalia

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Characteristics 
-

of Animalia.

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No

cell walls.

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Animals

have a period of embryonic development.

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Animals

have a period of embryonic development.

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Animals

eat food.

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Animals

eat food.

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Animals

move.

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Animals

move.

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Animals

have nervous and muscle tissue.

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Animals

have diplontic life cycle. Genetic information can come from a mother and father. (Many species)

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‡ A few ways animals reproduce without two parents.

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‡ Budding: Offspring develop as a growth on the body of the parent. New Individual

‡ Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces.

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‡ Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces. Each of these fragments develops into a mature worm, and the process is repeated.

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‡ Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces. Each of these fragments develops into a mature worm, and the process is repeated.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces. Each of these fragments develops into a mature worm, and the process is repeated.

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‡ Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces. Each of these fragments develops into a mature worm, and the process is repeated.

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‡ Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized.

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‡ Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized.

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‡ Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized.

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‡ Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized.

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‡ Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized.

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‡ Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized.

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Animals 
-

have three types of symmetry.

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Bilateral

symmetry.

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Bilateral 
Same

symmetry.

on both sides.

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Bilateral 
Same

symmetry.

on both sides.

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Bilateral 
Same

symmetry.

on both sides.

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Radial

Symmetry.

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Radial

Symmetry. 

Arranged

equally in all directions from a central point.

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Asymmetrical.

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Asymmetrical. 
Having

no symmetry.

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‡ Quiz 1-10 Name the type of symmetry ‡ Word bank: Bilateral, radial, asymmetrical. ‡ ³Let¶s do it with symbols´
± One finger ³Index Please!´ (Bilateral) ± All five fingers (Radial) ± Just a fist (asymmetrical)

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

1 

1 Bilateral symmetry 

2 

2 Bilateral symmetry 

3 

3 Radial symmetry 

4 

4

Radial symmetry 

5 

5 Asymmetrical 

6 

6 Bilateral symmetry 

7 

7 Asymmetrical 

8 

8 Bilateral symmetry 

9 

9 Radial Symmetry

Clam Open 

Clam Shut

10

Clam Open 

Clam Shut

10 Bilateral symmetry

‡ Bonus ± Name this movie?

?

‡ Bonus ±TWILIGHT? 

New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

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New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

New

Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Goal, you can look at any animal on the planet and be able to identify it to the phylum.

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‡ Goal, you can look at any animal on the planet and be able to identify it to the phylum.
± Instead of«´Oh, a worm thing with eyes.´

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‡ Goal, you can look at any animal on the planet and be able to identify it to the phylum.
± Instead of«´Oh, a worm thing with eyes.´ ± ³This is a member of the Kingdom Animalia in the phylum Platyhelminthes commonly called a flatworm.´

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‡ Important Note! This activity will be your best resource for the difficult graded recitation at the end of this slideshow.

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Chordata

Record four large circles in journal.

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Chordata Arthropoda

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Echinodermata

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Annelida

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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‡ Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia.

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‡ Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia.
± Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name.

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‡ Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia.
± Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. ± As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia.
± Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. ± As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. ± Sketch a few organisms within each phylum into the circles.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia.
± Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. ± As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. ± Sketch a few organisms within each phylum into the circles. ± Read some information about each and include in or around circles.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia.
± Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. ± As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. ± Sketch a few organisms within each phylum into the circles. ± Read some information about each and include in or around circles. ± Record the type of symmetry.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia.
± Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. ± As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. ± Sketch a few organisms within each phylum into the circles. ± Read some information about each and include in or around circles. ± Record the type of symmetry. ± Return tray with info packets neatly to the front.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia.
± Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. ± As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. ± Sketch a few organisms within each phylum into the circles. ± Read some information about each and include in or around circles. ± Record the type of symmetry. ± Return tray with info packets neatly to the front.

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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‡ Common Phylums of the Kingdom Animalia.
±±±±±±±±-

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‡ Note ± Not all of the Phylums of Animalia are covered. Most of the life on earth will fall into one of the Phylums covered.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Put any new information in circles Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Phylum

Mollusca

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Phylum 
Soft

Mollusca

bodies and some have shells.

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‡ Octopus and Squid are also Mollusks.

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Hoot Hoot That is one big Geoduck

‡ Sea slugs belong to the Phylum Mollusca. 

Phylum

Echinodermata - Spiny skinned organisms.

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Phylum

Echinodermata - Spiny skinned organisms.

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Phylum

Echinodermata - Spiny skinned organisms. 
Radial

symmetry

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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‡ A sea cucumber belongs to the Phylum Echinodermata.

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‡ A sea cucumber belongs to the Phylum Echinodermata.
± How is it different than the sea slug which belongs to Mollusca?

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‡ Which picture below is in the Phylum Mollusca, and which is in the Phylum Echinodermata?

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Phylum Echinodermata

Phylum Mollusca

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Phylum 
.

Cnidaria

Stinging cells.

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Phylum 
Silent

Cnidaria

Stinging cells.

C (ni dérree n).

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Phylum 
Silent

Cnidaria

Stinging cells.

C (ni dérree n). (ni  Radial symmetry.

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Phylum 
Silent

Cnidaria

Stinging cells.

C (ni dérree n). (ni  Radial symmetry.

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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What do you think?

Hoax Alert!

Be aware of hoaxes on the net.

Still a large Cnidarian however

‡ Corals that make up reefs are members are Cnidarians.

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‡ Comb Jellies belong to a different Phylum called Ctenophora.

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‡ Comb Jellies belong to a different Phylum called Ctenophora.
± They are shaped differently and have cilia to propel themselves.

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Phylum

Porifera

Sponges 

Phylum

Porifera

Sponges 

Asymmetrical.

Chordata Arthropoda

Mollusca Porifera

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Phylum

Rotifera

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Phylum

Rotifera
organisms 

Wheeled

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Phylum

Rotifera

organisms  (Draw in journal somewhere on page). 
Wheeled

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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Help Me! I ve been swallowed by a Rotifer!

‡ There are three types of worms

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms ± Roundworms

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms ± Roundworms ± Segmented worms

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms? ± Roundworms? ± Segmented worms?

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms? ± Roundworms? ± Segmented worms?

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms? ± Roundworms? ± Segmented worms?

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms? ± Roundworms? ± Segmented worms?

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms? ± Roundworms? ± Segmented worms?

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms? ± Roundworms? ± Segmented worms?

‡ There are three types of worms
± Flatworms? ± Roundworms? ± Segmented worms?

‡ Worms are very old.

‡ Worms are very old.
± Many fossils are dated back to the Cambrian, hundreds of millions of years ago. 

Phylum 
The

Nematoda

Roundworms.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ No joke, this is the mouth of a parasitic nematode that lives in your intestine and is common to almost all humans.

‡ Nematodes have a round body cavity. 

Phylum

Platyhelminthes.

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Phylum 
The

Platyhelminthes.

Flatworms.

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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‡ Flatworms (Platyhelminthes) eat and release waste (poop) from the same opening.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Phylum

Annelida

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Phylum 
The

Annelida

segmented worms.

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Echinodermata

Nematoda

Cnidaria

Annelida
Platyhelminthes

Rotifera

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‡ Video! Annelida (Leech Therapy)
± Caution! If you don¶t like leeches, you won¶t like this news clip.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Phylum

Arthropoda

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Phylum

Arthropoda
joints, 

Segmented

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Phylum

Arthropoda
joints, exoskeleton, 

Segmented

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Phylum

Arthropoda
joints, exoskeleton, 

Segmented

Exoskeleton: An external skeleton that supports and protects an animal's body

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Phylum

Arthropoda
joints, exoskeleton, bilateral 

Segmented

symmetry.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Statistics vary, but millions and millions of Arthropod species exist. They outnumber all other phylums of animals combined.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Statistics vary, but millions and millions of Arthropod species exist. They outnumber all other phylums of animals combined.
± The Class Insecta represents 90% of all known species.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Arthropods are some of the smallest members of the Kingdom Animalia, such as this member of the family Eriophyid

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

The 
-

Classes of the Phylum Arthropoda. Arthropoda.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
6

Insecta

legs.  3 body parts. 
Head,

thorax, abdomen. 

Compound

eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Which specimen below is not in the Class Insecta?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Answer- Tick, It has 8 legs and two body parts, no antennae, no wings - Arachnida

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Insects are believed by many scientists to be the most successful organisms on the planet.

‡ Why Insects are some of the most successful species on the planet.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Why Insects are some of the most successful species on the planet.
± They have been around for the last 400 millions years.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Why Insects are some of the most successful species on the planet.
± They have been around for the last 400 millions years. ± They survive in every environment on earth.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Why Insects are some of the most successful species on the planet.
± They have been around for the last 400 millions years. ± They survive in every environment on earth.
‡ Can survive extreme heat and drought.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Why Insects are some of the most successful species on the planet.
± They have been around for the last 400 millions years. ± They survive in every environment on earth.
‡ Can survive extreme heat and drought.

± They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Why Insects are some of the most successful species on the planet.
± They have been around for the last 400 millions years. ± They survive in every environment on earth.
‡ Can survive extreme heat and drought.

± They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. ± They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining).

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Why Insects are some of the most successful species on the planet.
± They have been around for the last 400 millions years. ± They survive in every environment on earth.
‡ Can survive extreme heat and drought.

± They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. ± They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). ± 8 out of every 10 species on earth is an insect.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Why Insects are some of the most successful species on the planet.
± They have been around for the last 400 millions years. ± They survive in every environment on earth.
‡ Can survive extreme heat and drought.

± They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. ± They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). ± 8 out of every 10 species on earth is an insect.
Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class

Crustacea 

Head

and abdomen  Some have many legs (8+) with many jobs.  Most are aquatic

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class

Crustacea 

Head

and abdomen  Some have many legs (8+) with many jobs.  Most are aquatic

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class

Crustacea 

Head

and abdomen  Some have many legs (8+) with many jobs.  Most are aquatic

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class

Crustacea 

Head

and abdomen  Some have many legs (8+) with many jobs.  Most are aquatic

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Coconut crab (Birgus latro) largest terrestrial arthropod / Crustacean.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ The Alaskan King Crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus). is the largest aquatic arthropod / crustacean.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ The single animal species that makes up the most biomass is a crustacean called the copepod.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ The single animal species that makes up the most biomass is a crustacean called the copepod.
± If you weighed all the elephants in the world, they wouldn¶t even move the scale compared to all of the copepods.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Class 
8

Arachnida

legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts. 
Head

and sensory.  Abdomen. 
Most

live on land.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Mites are the most diverse Arachnid.
± Picture of dust mites on dust and carpet.

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‡ Spiders are the second most diverse class of Arachnids.

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‡ Some Arachnida make webs to catch their prey.

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‡ Some Arachnida make webs to catch their prey.

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‡ Ticks and Scorpions are also Arachnids.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae

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Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Sub

Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda) 

Head

and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  2 Antennae

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Centipedes ± Class Chilopoda

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‡ Millipedes ± Class Spirobolida

‡ Which is in the Class Insecta, and which is in the Class Arachnida? Why?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Arachnida 8 legs, 2 body parts

Insecta 6 legs, 3 body parts

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Which is in the class Insecta, and which is in the class Crustacea? Why?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Insecta 6 legs, wings.

Crustacea 8+ legs, aquatic.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ What class of Arthropoda is the specimen below?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Answer! Class Arachnida.
± (Galeodes arabs) aka« Camel Spider

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ What Class of Arthropoda is the specimen below?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Answer! Class Arachnida. 8 legs, two body parts, no antennae, no wings. - Mite

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ What Class of Arthropoda is the specimen below?

‡ Answer! Class Crustacea, 8+ specialized legs, aquatic.

‡ What Sub-Phylum of arthropods does this specimen belong to?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Answer! Sub-Phylum Myriapoda
± Class Chilopoda

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‡ Which specimen is in the class Arachnida, and which is in the class Chilopoda?

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‡ Chilopoda

Arachnida

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‡ What class of Arthropoda would this specimen belong to?

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‡ Answer! Class: Arachnida
± Order: Pseudoscorpiones

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‡ Video! (Optional) Really cool image of a Pseudoscorpion.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Looking at pond water to identify phylum of animals.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Looking at pond water to identify phylum of animals.
± Make three circles with a Petri-dish.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Looking at pond water to identify phylum of animals.
± Make three circles with a Petri-dish. ± Make a wet-mount slide with one drop of pond water (get a chunk from the sample)

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Looking at pond water to identify phylum of animals.
± Make three circles with a Petri-dish. ± Make a wet-mount slide with one drop of pond water (get a chunk from the sample) ± Draw a specimen in your circle and try to identify it. (You may see a Protist)

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Activity! Looking at pond water to identify phylum of animals.
± Make three circles with a Petri-dish. ± Make a wet-mount slide with one drop of pond water (get a chunk from the sample) ± Draw a specimen in your circle and try to identify it. (You may see a Protist)

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Chordata 
Having

a backbone or notocord. notocord.

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Chordata 
Having

a backbone or notocord. notocord.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Chordata 
Having

a backbone or notocord. notocord.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Picture of Lanclet Subphylum Cephalochordata (Branchiostoma lanceolatum)

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‡ Fossil of early backboned creature dating 560 million years ago.

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Classes 
-Fish 
-

of Chordata (The Big 5)

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Class

Mammalia: Have hair Mammalia:

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I still have a few hairs on my chin, 

Class

Reptilia: Have scales. Reptilia:

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‡ Order Squamata: Lizards, snakes and amphisbaenids
± About 7,900 species

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‡ Picture of Amphisbaenids«aka ³Worm Lizards´

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Picture of a horned toad (Phrynosoma hernandesi)

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‡ Picture of a horned toad (Phrynosoma hernandesi)
± It can shoot blood out of it¶s eye to confuse predators. Blood contains some mild toxins.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Picture of the ³Jesus Lizard´ (Basiliscus Plumifrons)
± Running on water helps it avoid predators.

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‡ Order: Sphenodontia - Tuataras from New Zealand:
± 2 species

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‡ Order Crocodilla - Crocodiles, gharials, caimans and alligators:
± 23 species

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‡ Gharials are like alligators but have a long thin snout.
± They are found in Northern India.

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‡ Alligator:
± Picture of The American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

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‡ Order:Testudines -Turtles and tortoises:
± Approximately 300 species

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‡ Reptiles generally lay eggs such as this sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea).

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Class

Amphibia: Double Life Amphibia: water.

land and

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‡ Amphibia have a double life because«
± They live in the water and then on land.

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‡ Amphibia have a double life because«
± They live in the water and then on land.
‡ Lose tail and grow legs.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Amphibia have a double life because«
± They live in the water and then on land.
‡ Lose tail and grow legs.

± They breathe with gills and then lungs.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Amphibians usually lay jelly-like eggs in water.
± Eggs have a larval stage

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Order Anura ± Frogs and Toads

‡ Order Anura ± Frogs and Toads
± Have four limbs

‡ Order Anura ± Frogs and Toads
± Have four limbs ± Some are vocal.

‡ Is this a frog or a toad?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae)

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae)
± The class that includes toads have more stubby legs.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae)
± The class that includes toads have more stubby legs. ± Drier and warty skin.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae)
± The class that includes toads have more stubby legs. ± Drier and warty skin. ± Poison glands behind eyes

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae)
± The class that includes toads have more stubby legs. ± Drier and warty skin. ± Poison glands behind eyes ± Eggs laid in a chain not a clutch.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

My name is toad, but I think it comes from toadstools which are Fungus and not amphibians

Never choose me in Mario Kart unless your competitor has chosen Yoshi

‡ Order Caudata: Salamanders
± Bearing a tail.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Picture of Giant Salamander (Andrias davidianus)
± Lives in mountain rivers of China.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Order Apoda: Caecilians
± Without legs ± Subterranean diggers

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

‡ Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

They don t exist and have never existed.

‡ The Komodo Dragon doesn¶t breathe fire and fly.
± Another cheesy common name.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ The Komodo Dragon doesn¶t breathe fire and fly.
± Another cheesy common name.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Any guesses to what the common names are for the Class Aves and Actinopterygii in the Phylum Chordata.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Aves

Actinopterygi (Lobed fish)

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Class

Aves: Feathers, bills, wishbone

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Aves also have

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Aves also have
± Lightweight bones.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Aves also have
± Lightweight bones. ± No teeth.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Aves also have
± Lightweight bones. ± No teeth. ± Produce large eggs.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Aves also have
± Lightweight bones. ± No teeth. ± Produce large eggs. ± Many can navigate well.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Aves also have
± Lightweight bones. ± No teeth. ± Produce large eggs. ± Many can navigate well. ± Song production.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Aves also have
± Lightweight bones. ± No teeth. ± Produce large eggs. ± Many can navigate well. ± Song production.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Aves (birds) evolved from reptiles«

‡ Birds can be very small and fly.

‡ Birds can be very large and non fly. 

Superclass

Agnatha: The jawless fish Agnatha:

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Class Myxini - Hagfish

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‡ Class Cephalaspidomorphi - Lampreys

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 

Superclass

Gnathostomata: Gnathostomata: Jawed Fish

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Class Chondrichthyes: (Sharks, Rays, and Skates)

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‡ Class Chondrichthyes: (Sharks, Rays, and Skates)
± Skeleton made of cartilage.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Class Chondrichthyes: (Sharks, Rays, and Skates)
± Skeleton made of cartilage. ± Body covered with triangular scales.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ Picture of shark scales under the microscope.
± Notice the triangular shape. 

Class

Osteichthyes (Bony Fish): Scales (most), fins, gills, gas bladder.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ The class Osteichthyes is made up of 26,000 species
± They come in many sizes and shapes.

‡ End of Part III ± Are you current on your unit assessment?

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

End Taxonomy and Classification Unit Part III/V

End Part III / VI of an educational unit about Taxonomy and Classification for students in grades 7-10 Part I: Taxonomy and Classification Part II: Kingdom Monera Part III: Kingdoms Protista and Animalia Part IV: Animalia and Mammals Part V: Kingdom Fungi an Plantae Part VI: Final Recitation Download the Powerpoint version of this video, unit notes, assessments, lab handouts, review games, videos, and much more at www.sciencepowerpoint.com

End Part III / VI of an educational unit about Taxonomy and Classification for students in grades 7-10 Part I: Taxonomy and Classification Part II: Kingdom Monera Part III: Kingdoms Protista and Animalia Part IV: Animalia and Mammals Part V: Kingdom Fungi an Plantae Part VI: Final Recitation Download the Powerpoint version of this video, unit notes, assessments, lab handouts, review games, videos, and much more at www.sciencepowerpoint.com

End Part III / VI of an educational unit about Taxonomy and Classification for students in grades 7-10 Part I: Taxonomy and Classification Part II: Kingdom Monera Part III: Kingdoms Protista and Animalia Part IV: Animalia and Mammals Part V: Kingdom Fungi an Plantae Part VI: Final Recitation Download the Powerpoint version of this video, unit notes, assessments, lab handouts, review games, videos, and much more at www.sciencepowerpoint.com

‡ More Units Available at«

Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and coming soon The Anatomy and Physiology Unit.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ More Units Available at«

Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and coming soon The Anatomy and Physiology Unit.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ More Units Available at«

Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and coming soon The Anatomy and Physiology Unit.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

‡ More Units Available at«

Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and coming soon The Anatomy and Physiology Unit.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

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