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Creating the learning

environment
“Young people today think of nothing
but themselves. They have no
reverence for parents or old age.”
Peter the Hermit 1274
A legal framework

1989 Elton “Establishing a whole school behaviour policy is an
important step”

1996 Ofsted “The need to improve the behaviour by ensuring
the best teaching practice, observed across departments
is shared and applied by all staff”

1997 Oxfordshire Behaviour Plan “Sharpen awareness of the
justification or otherwise for ascribing particular
misbehaviours, motivation and attitudes”
Legal Framework 2

1998 Schools Standards Act ‘Home School Agreements’

1999 Social Inclusion - Pupil Support
‘Behaviour Policies’ - Multi agency work - PSPs

Staff, governors LEA, Parents
Key Stage 3 Strategy
Behaviour and attendance

• Audit to action plan – launch 2003
• Behaviour and attendance consultant
• Behaviour and attendance coordinator (BEACO)
• Networks
Principles of the strategy

To promote consistent, coherent and sustained approaches to the
management of behaviour and attendance

To build on current policies and practices and explore ways of making
these impact more fully at classroom level

Promote planning, teaching and organisation that supports good
learning

Consult and involve young people, parents and the community

Identify and share good practice
Review and plan 10 aspects

• Everyday policies
• Systems to deal with poor behaviour
• Bullying
• Pupil support systems
• Classroom behaviour
• Out of classroom behaviour
• Curriculum
• Attendance
• Leadership and management
• Links with partners and other agencies
Strategy Audit July 2004
Why?
Requires Major
Strength Content attention concern

Leadership management  
Policies 
Dealing with poor behaviour 
Bullying 
Support systems 
Classroom behaviour  
Out of classroom behaviour 
Curriculum 
Attendance  
Outside agencies 
Strategies for behaviour management
Where are we now?

Incident reports
300+ per half term
90% classroom based

Removal from class
150+ (estimate)
30+ some faculties
0 other faculties

Exclusions
93 Fixed term
5 planned transfers
1 permanent
Where do you stand?
Strongly agree < > Strongly disagree

1. Boys often behave better that girls
2. Parents are the single biggest factor affecting behaviour

3. Young peoples’ behaviour is better now than it used to be

4. Adults can affect student behaviour

5. Students choose how to behave
Successful Schools

• Premium Facilities
• Excellent Teaching
• Fantastic Students
• First Class Leadership
• Supportive Parents
• Consistency
Behaviour Management
What is it?

• Whole school
• Every classroom
• Every teacher
• Project development/task group
• consultation
A behaviour plan

• Rules
• Rewards
• Consequences

In and out of lessons
XXX SCHOOL behaviour plan

RULES in this classroom

BE ON TIME for your lessons
FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS from staff straight away
DO YOUR WORK QUIETLY & let others work without disturbing them
SWEARING is not allowed
DO NOT EAT, DRINK OR CHEW in lessons

REWARDS
SPOKEN PRAISE and written comments
PHONE CALLS and letters home
ACHIEVEMENT CREDITS
HEADS COMMENDATION
ALL CREDITS COUNT for prize draws

CONSEQUENCES if you choose not to follow the rules:
2. WARNING
3. MOVE WITHIN CLASS
4. REMOVAL FROM CLASSROOM FOR UP TO FIVE MINUTES
5. DEPARTMENTAL SUPERVISION
Severe misbehaviour will result in DIRECT ANNEXATION AND THE INVOLVEMENT OF SENIOR STAFF
RULES outside the classroom

when the bell rings
MOVE QUICKLY TO YOUR NEXT LESSON

when passing in corridors and on stairs
KEEP TO THE LEFT

follow instructions from staff
STRAIGHT AWAY

do not SWEAR

Put LITTER IN BINS

look after SCHOOL PROPERTY
Assertive Discipline

Main principles

• Make your requirements clear + consistent

• Give continuous positive feedback

• Publish and use a hierarchy of mild but irksome sanctions for
rule breaking
Teaching Styles

• Non Directional teachers

• Provocative teachers

• Constructive teachers
Non Directional Teachers
• Vague
• Sometimes threatening
• Over optimistic
• Helpless

• Anxiety laden

• Emotionally binding
• They encourage a poor choice of response

• They invite argument, often inadvertently students have to
‘de code’ what they mean, e.g. “do you think you could stop
talking?” means: STOP TALKING
Provocative Teachers
• Hostile

• Emotive

• Threatening

• Sarcastic

• Unsophisticated

• They evoke fear, dread, anger
usually at the students’ expense

• They say things like
“What is your problem?
You make me sick!”
Constructive Teachers

• Clear and decisive
• Respect the dignity of the student
• Mean what they say and say what they mean
• Intervene sensibly and sensitively
• Gracious in manner, yet firm in their expectations
• Use humour to good effect
• Punctual and well prepared
• They have a plan for classroom management and use it
consistently for all students, not just the troublemakers
• They are constantly aware of good student response and
behaviour and acknowledge it as a matter of course, both
individually and collectively
Giving Directions

Allow time in your lesson to:

Explain routines

Involve students when explaining importance

Check for understanding

Review regularly at first and after breaks
Re-Directing to Task or Win/Win Situations

•Keep calm
•In close - lower voice
•Give direction
•Recognise emotion – return direction
•(broken record) “ I need you to…”
•Advise of warning
•Keep it short!
•Return to teach
5 Truths

Behaviour can be taught

3:1 praise and sanction

20 seconds telling off – then teach

Condemn behaviour and not the child

Have a plan – you are the adult