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Wireless control that simply works

Emerging Standards:
Where does ZigBee fit
October , 2004

Bob Heile
Chairman, ZigBee Alliance

The Wireless Market

TEXT INTERNET/AUDIO COMPRESSED MULTI-CHANNEL
VIDEO DIGITAL VIDEO
LONG

802.11b 802.15.3/WIMEDIA
< RANGE >

802.11a/HL2 & 802.11g

ZigBee

Bluetooth 2
SHORT

Bluetooth1

LOW < ACTUAL THROUGHPUT > HIGH

Month Year
Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance, Inc.
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Inc. wirelessly networked. 3 . What is the ZigBee Alliance? • An Organization with a mission to define reliable. low-power. cost-effective. monitoring and control products based on an open global standard • Alliance provides • upper layer stack and application profiles • compliance and certification testing • branding • Result is a set of interoperable solutions recognizable in the market Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance.

Inc. Why do we need ZigBee technology? • No standard approach today that addresses the unique needs of most remote monitoring and control applications – Enables the broad-based deployment of reliable wireless networks with low complexity. low cost solutions – Provides the ability to run for years on inexpensive primary batteries for a typical monitoring application – Capable of inexpensively supporting robust mesh networking technologies Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. 4 .

5 . Applications security HVAC TV AMR VCR lighting control DVD/CD access control BUILDING CONSUMER remote AUTOMATION ELECTRONICS patient monitoring ZigBee mouse fitness Wireless Control that keyboard monitoring PERSONAL Simply Works PC & joystick HEALTH CARE PERIPHERALS asset mgt security process RESIDENTIAL/ HVAC control LIGHT lighting control environmental INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL CONTROL CONTROL access control energy mgt lawn & garden irrigation Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. Inc.

Philips and Samsung • A rapidly growing list (Over 100 participants) of industry leaders worldwide committed to providing ZigBee-compliant products and solutions – Companies include semiconductor manufacturers. OEMs. and end users Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. Motorola. wireless IP providers. Mitsubishi. Honeywell. Inc. 6 . Invensys. Freescale.Who is supporting the ZigBee Alliance? • Eight promoter companies – Ember.

. 1(1%) Europe/Middle East 9 (25%) 14 (22%) 28 (30%) North/South America 24 (67%) 37 (59%) 47 (51%) Total Member 36 63 93 Companies 30% Asia/Pacific Europe/Middle East North /South America 18% 51% Australia 1% Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. 2003 August 2004 Asia/Pacific 3 (8%) 12 (19%) 17 (18%) Australia . Inc. 7 . Member Growth & Geographical Distribution Region Dec. 2002 Dec.

4 • ZigBee adds logical network. security and application software • ZigBee continues to work closely with the IEEE to ensure an integrated and complete solution for the market Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. 8 .4? • ZigBee takes full advantage of a powerful physical radio specified by IEEE 802.15.15. How is ZigBee related to IEEE 802. Inc.

80c51) APPLICATION FRAMEWORK • Compact protocol NETWORK/SECURTIY stack LAYERS ZigBee Alliance • Supports even MAC LAYER Platform simpler slave-only PHY LAYER IEEE stack Application ZigBee Platform Stack Silicon Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. Inc. 9 .g. Protocol Stack Features • 8-bit microcontroller APPLICATION/PROFILES ZigBee or OEM (e.

4 GHz ISM Worldwide 250 kbps 16 868 MHz Europe 20 kbps 1 915 MHz ISM Americas 40 kbps 10 Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. 10 . Inc. Frequencies and Data Rates BAND COVERAGE DATA RATE # OF CHANNEL(S) 2.

11 . Inc. Basic Network Characteristics • 65.536 network (client) nodes • Optimized for timing-critical applications – Network join time: 30 ms (typ) – Sleeping slave changing to Network coordinator active: 15 ms (typ) Full Function node – Active slave channel access Reduced Function node time: 15 ms (typ) Communications flow Virtual links Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance.

Inc. 12 . Topology Models Mesh Star PAN coordinator Cluster Tree Full Function Device Reduced Function Device Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance.

13 . machines typically cannot • Humans tolerate garbled communication. machines do not Barrier #2: wireless expertise • Customers (and some installers) do not want to become wireless experts • Want “wireless control that simply works” Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. Inc.Mesh networks overcome barriers to wireless adoption Barrier #1: reliability • People can move when wireless reception is poor.

14 . Lighting Control • Advance Transformer [Philips Lighting] – Wireless lighting control • Dimmable ballasts • Light switches anywhere • Customizable lighting schemes • Energy savings on bright days • Dali [or other] interface to BMS – Extendable networks • Additional sensors • Other networks Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. Inc.

Inc. HVAC Energy Management • Hotel energy management – Major operating expense for hotel • Centralized HVAC management allow hotel operator to make sure empty rooms are not cooled – Retrofit capabilities – Battery operated t-stats can be placed for convenience – Personalized room settings at check-in Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. 15 .

• Multiple containers in a ship form a mesh to report sensor data • Increased security through on-truck and on-ship tamper detection • Faster container processing. Manifest data and sensor data are known before ship docks at port. Inc. Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. sensors form a mesh network. Asset Management • Within each container. 16 .

17 . Inc. Supermarket Management Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance.

Inc. 18 . Residential Control Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance.

Inc. 19 .11b Bluetooth ZigBee Power Profile Hours Days Years Complexity Very Complex Complex Simple Nodes/Master 32 7 64000 Enumeration upto 10 Latency Enumeration upto 3 seconds Enumeration 30ms seconds Range 100 m 10m 70m-300m Extendability Roaming possible No YES Data Rate 11Mbps 1Mbps 250Kbps Authentication Service Set 128 bit AES and Application Security 64 bit. Comparison of key features of complementary protocols Feature(s) IEEE 802. 128 bit ID (SSI D) Layer user defined HVAC control in building automation Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance.

Inc. Why ZigBee? • Reliable and self healing • Supports large number of nodes • Easy to deploy • Very long battery life • Secure • Low cost • Can be used globally Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. 20 .

21 . Inc. Advantages of ZigBee over proprietary solutions? • Product interoperability • Vendor independence • Increased product innovation as a result of industry standardization • A common platform is more cost effective than creating a new proprietary solution from scratch every time • Companies can focus their energies on finding and serving customers Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance.

Benefits of joining the alliance • Access to – Specifications – Member IP pool – Event lists – Media and analysts – VCs • Network with – Members – Customers – Vendors – Partners Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. 22 . Inc.

Inc. 23 . Benefits of joining the alliance • World class PR – Be associated with a hot technology – Leverage Alliance event and PR activities • Your competitors are here. get a sense of the market direction and optimize your product/company plans • Equivalent info from other sources would cost many multiples of the annual membership fee • Result is you get to market quicker with a better solution Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. chance to strengthen leadership position • Get access to marketing ideas.

Inc. ZigBee Alliance Chairman bheile@ieee. ZigBee.org Month Year Copyright 2004 The ZigBee Alliance. More Information ZigBee Alliance web site http://www. 24 .org Bob Heile.