Principles of Egg Cookery

Always use low temperatures for a short time to prevent toughening, curdling, and discoloration Cook only until desired firmness is achieved.

Terms to Know
The following terms are ones that you will be responsible for knowing. Write them down and make sure that you add details as we go through the slides.

Terms
‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ Porous Versatile 6 functions (know an example of each) Coddled Basted Hard cooked Coagulate Poached

Eggs: Thickening Agent
Function #1

The protein of the egg white and yolk coagulates when heated, to thicken food mixtures. Used for pie fillings, custards, pudding, egg sauces.

Eggs: Emulsifier
Function #2

An emulsion is a mixture of oil and another liquid, beaten together so that the oil is spread evenly throughout the mixture and it will not separate. The egg yolk acts as an emulsifier because the proteins surround tiny globules of oil and keep it from separating.

Eggs: Leavening Agent
Function #3

Eggs give height or volume to many products by being whipped between two and one-half and four times their normal volume. Used in cakes, meringues and souffles

Eggs: Coating
Function # 4

Ex: baked chicken or fish

Coating: Eggs ³glue´ one food to another by being dipped into beaten egg and then rolled in crumbs or flour.

Eggs: Binder
Function # 5

Binder: Eggs bind ingredients and hold them together. Ex: meatloaf and meatballs

Eggs: Flavor, Fat, & Color
Function #6

Eggs add flavor, fat, and color to baked goods.

The Versatility of Eggs
Eggs are used as a main ingredient for desserts, breakfast, main dishes, appetizers, soups and sauces. Versatile = many uses

Sauces & Dressings
Emulsions

‡ Caesar Dressing ‡ Mayonnaise ‡ Hollandaise

Desserts Bread Pudding, Custard, Angel Food Cake, Souffles, Ice Cream, Meringues

Main Dishes/Entrees

Breakfast/Brunch

Coddled Eggs
The egg(s) are broken into the buttered coddler, and seasonings are added. The coddler is then closed with the lid and partially immersed in boiling water for a few minutes. When the eggs are cooked to the desired firmness, the coddler is lifted from the boiling water, the lid removed, and breakfast is served, in a lovely decorated dish.

Basted Eggs
‡ Basting the eggs by spooning hot fat over them will help cook the tops.

Egg Cookery
How to Prepare: Scrambled, Fried, Poached, Omelets and Hard Cooked Eggs

Scrambled Eggs

For 1 to 2 servings, in small bowl, beat together 2 eggs and 2 tablespoons skim or 1% low-fat milk with salt and pepper to taste, if desired, until blended.

In 7- to 8-inch omelet pan or skillet over medium heat, heat 1 teaspoon butter or cooking oil (or use cooking spray) until just hot enough to sizzle a drop of water. Pour in egg mixture.

As mixture begins to set, gently draw an inverted pancake turner completely across bottom and sides of pan, forming large, soft curds

Continue cooking until eggs are thickened and no visible liquid egg remains. Do not stir constantly.

Fried Eggs

For 1 to 2 servings, in 7- to 8-inch omelet pan or skillet over medium-high heat, heat 1 teaspoon to 2 tablespoons butter or cooking oil (or use cooking spray) until just hot enough to sizzle a drop of water. (If very large pan is used, more butter will be needed.) Break and slip 2 eggs into pan. Immediately reduce heat to low.

Cook slowly until whites are completely set and yolks begin to thicken but are not hard, covering tightly with lid (adding 1 teaspoon water after edges turn white for steam-basted, if desired), spooning butter over eggs to baste or turning eggs to cook both sides.

For over easy or over hard, gently lift eggs with pancake turner and flip upside down into pan to cook second sides.

Poached Eggs
Eggs cooked out of the shell in simmering liquid

Poaching Eggs
In saucepan or deep omelet pan or skillet, bring 2 to 3 inches of water, skim or 1% low-fat milk, reduced-fat broth, tomato juice, wine or other liquid to boiling. Reduce heat to keep water gently simmering. Break cold eggs, 1 at a time, into custard cup or saucer or break several into bowl. Holding dish close to water¶s surface, slip eggs into water.

Cook until whites are completely set and yolks begin to thicken but are not hard, about 3 to 5 minutes. With slotted spoon, lift out eggs. Drain in spoon or on paper towels. Trim any rough edges, if desired.

Poaching gadgets
There are many types of ³poaching´ gadgets: rings and eggshaped, colander-like holders to corral eggs as they cook in liquid; tiny pans and nonstick pan inserts with egg-shaped cups for steam-cooking eggs held above the liquid; even steampoaching electric egg cookers.

Omelets

For 1 to 2 servings, in small bowl, beat together 2 eggs and 2 tablespoons water or milk with 1/8 teaspoon salt and dash pepper, if desired, until blended.

In 7- to 10-inch omelet pan or skillet over medium-high heat, heat 1 teaspoon butter or cooking oil (or use cooking spray) until just hot enough to sizzle a drop of water. Pour in egg mixture. (Mixture should set immediately at edges.)

With inverted pancake turner, carefully push cooked portions at edges toward center so uncooked portions can reach hot pan surface. Tilt pan and move cooked portions as necessary.

When top is thickened and no visible liquid egg remains, fill, if desired. With pancake turner, fold omelet in half or roll. (Fillings should be sauted before hand and set aside)

Invert onto plate with a quick flip of the wrist or slide from pan onto plate.

Hard Cooked Eggs

Hard Cooked Eggs
not hard boiled

‡ Place eggs in single layer in saucepan. Add enough tap water to come at least 1 inch above eggs.

‡ Cover. Quickly bring just to boiling. Turn off heat.

.

‡ Immediately run cold water over eggs or place them in ice water until completely cooled.

To remove shell, crackle it by tapping it gently all over. Roll egg between hand to loosen shell

Peel, starting at large end. Hold egg under running cold water to help ease off shell.

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