I. II. III.

Formal elements of Art Baroque Rococo

IV. Neoclassicism V. Romanticism

VI. Realism

Formal elements of Art (8)

‡ Line ‡ Color ‡ Shape ‡ Form

‡ Space ‡ Texture ‡ Proportion ‡ Scale

What is Baroque?
‡ Italy, Spain, France, Netherlands ‡ From Portuguese pearl of irregular shape (derogatory) ‡ Described the abnormal, strangeness, extravagance ‡ Counter Reformation Art- help spread the faith in the church ‡ Consolidation of monarchies: wealthier middle class ‡ Art patronage ‡ Contemporary with naturalism and classicism

Baroque Characteristics
‡ New interest in nature (Landscapes) ‡ Tenebrism lighting ‡ Realistic, proportional figures ‡ Close up on the active scene ‡ Composition diagonals ‡ Heavy, specific lighting ‡ Backgrounds were unimportant ‡ More connection to the spectator ‡ Missionaries took paintings to other regions to convert regions to faith

Baroque by Regions
Italy: Style appeared in the 17th century Church responds to the protestants with the Counter reformation. Council of Trent (1563) Established rules for religious art. As Catholic Reformation propaganda, Baroque images allowed a viewer to feel the sufferings, ecstasies, and revelations of saints. France: King Louis 14th was the most influential person. He devised an art academy and decides de rules of good and bad art Made Paris the center of the world Moved to Versailles and built a palace, made it the capital. Importance of display in society Flandes: Beginning of the Art Market (nitch market) Portraiture, Genre, Still Life, Landscapes Control of international sea trade Amsterdam became richest cultural center. Art market patronized by rich middle-class

Baroque (Italy)
Style appeared in the 17th century Church responds to the protestants with the Counter reformation. Council of Trent (1563) Established rules for religious art. As Catholic Reformation propaganda, Baroque images allowed a viewer to feel the sufferings, ecstasies, and revelations of saints.

LazaroPardode
Title: The fransiscan martyrs Artist: LazaroPardo Medium: Oil on canvas Date: 1630 Was used to convert people into religion during Counter-reform. Was considered the ultimate sacrifice for your faith.

Artemisia Gentileschi
Title: Susanna and the Elders Artist: Artemisia Gentileschi Medium: Oil on canvas Date: 1610 Made by the first woman painter in the scene. Is taking inspiration from Caravaggio Artemisia was invited into the School of Venice It s a representation of her own life.

Michelangelo Merisi (Caravaggio)
Title: Cruxifiction of St. Peter Medium: Oil Date: 1601 Close up and dramatic lighting The background is unimportant

Caravaggio Crucifixion of St. Peter Oil 1601

Francesco Borromini
Title: interior of the dome at S.Carloalle Quattro Fontane Artist: Francesco Borromini Medium: Architecture Date: 1638 There is no such thing as straight lines

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Title: Ecstasy of St. Theresa Artist: Bernini Medium: Marble sculpture Date: 1647 Composed of mixed mediums Interpretation of a memoir written by a spanish mystic 80 years earlier

Baroque (France)
‡ ‡ King Louis 14th was the most influential person. He devised an art academy and decides de rules of good and bad art Made Paris the center of the world Moved to Versailles and built a palace, made it the capital. Importance of display in society

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‡

Nicolas Poussin
Title: Baptism Artist: Nicolas Poussin Date: 1658 Medium: Oil on Canvas The landscape is the Countryside of Rome Poussin is the most famous painter of his time.

Pierre Patel
Title: View of the Chateau of Versailles Artist: Pierre Patel Medium: Oil on canvas Date: 1688

Baroque (Flandes)
‡ Beginning of the Art Market (nitch market) ‡ Portraiture, Genre, Still Life, Landscapes ‡ Control of international sea trade ‡ Amsterdam became richest cultural center. ‡ Art market patronized by rich middle-class

Rembrandt
Title: The Jewish Bride Artist: Rembrandt Medium: Oil on Canvas Date: 1665 Rembrandt used himself as a model. Wedding portrait for a Jewish couple posing as the biblical Isaac and Rebecca.

Johannes Vermeer
Title: The milkmaid Artist: Johannes Vermeer Medium: Oil on canvas Date: 1660 Artist used a projecting device

Spanish Baroque
Title: Las Menninas Artist: Diego Velazquez Medium: Oil on canvas Date: 1656 The artist painted himself in the picture. He also painted the works of master artists as a background setting.

What is the Rococo?
‡ Rococo comes from rocaille (Rock Work) ‡ Early 18th century France ‡ Evolved from Baroque into The Era of Enlightenment ‡ Science replaced religion ‡ End of Louis XIV reign. ‡ Industrial Revolution- facilitated work. ‡ Representation of aristocracy

Rococo Characteristics
‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ Elegant Soft edges and color Idealized Pastel colors Curving forms ‡ Fanciful Figures ‡ Extreme Highlights ‡ Dynamic Compositions ‡ Attention to detail

DogonCarver(Africa)
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Title: Seated Couple Period: African/Dogan culture Date: 16th-19th centuries Medium: wood and metal Significance: This sculpture gives eloquent expression to the shared and symmetrical responsibilities of men and women in Dogon society.

Shitoa(China/Quing)
‡ Title: Man in a house on a mountain ‡ Period: China/Quing Dynasty ‡ Date: c.1700 ‡ Medium: Ink and colours on paper. ‡ Significance:

Antoine Watteau(France)
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Title: Gilles Period: Rococo Date: 1716-18 Medium: Oil on Canvas Significance: The fete galante, a small easel painting in which elegant people are depicted in conversation or music-making in a secluded parkland setting

Jean-Simeon Chardin(France)
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Title: The Copper Fountain Period: Rococo Date: 1734 Medium: oil on canvas Significance: Chose objects of everyday life, and really showed unique technique.

William Hogarth(France)
Title: A Rake s Progress Period: Rococo Date: 1735 Medium: etching and engraving on paper. ‡ A series shows the decline and fall of Tom Rakewell
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Khushala(India)
‡ Title: Radha Pining in the wilderness ‡ Period: India/Punjab Hills ‡ Date: c. 1780 ‡ Medium: Ink and Opaque watercolour on paper. ‡ Significance: king and queen who dance in Vrndavana forest, may the desires of a person who repeatedly recites this Karpanyapanjika become fulfilled.

What is Neoclassicism?

Ettienne-Maurice Falconet
Title: Peter the great Period: Neoclassicism Date: 1766-78 Medium: Bronze on a base of red granite ‡ Significance: statue is now one of the symbols of Saint Petersburg, in much the same way that the Statue of Liberty
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Antonio Canova
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Title: Cupid and Psych Period: Neoclassicism Date: 1797 Medium: marble Significance: In a book known as The Golden Ass To show a meaning of Love.

Jacques-Louis David
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Title: The oath of the Horatti Period: Neoclassicism Date: 1784 Medium: Oil on Canvas Significance: The painting illustrates the three sons of Horatius swear on their swords, held by their father, that they will defend Rome to the death.

Francisco Dan Goya
‡ Title: This Is What You Were Born For ‡ Period: Romanticism ‡ Date: c. 1810-14 ‡ Medium: Etching ‡ Significance: Plate XII From the Disasters of War

William Blake
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Title: The Ancient of Days Period: Romanticism Date: 1794/1824 Medium: Etching with Pen and Brown ink, Water Color and Gold BodyColour ‡ Significance: To show god creating the world we live in today.

Joseph William Mallord Turner
‡ Title: Snow Storm: Hannibal and his Army Crossing the Alps ‡ Period: Romanticism ‡ Date: 1812 ‡ Medium: Oil on canvas ‡ Significance: is a fusion of Joseph Mallord William Turner s travel experiences in Europe and the ancient historical accounts of Hannibal s invasion of Italy in 218 B.C.

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
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Title: Madame Riviere Period: Neoclassicism Date: 1806 Medium: oil on canvas Significance: This dress appears to be a combination of white satin and transparent white net. The veil is also of transparent net, a not uncommon headdress for portraits which showed off the painter's amazing realism.

ChristofferEckersberg
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Title: Standing Female Nude Period: Neoclassicism Date: 1837 Medium: Oil on Canvas Significance:

Theodore Gericault
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Title: Charging Chausseur Period: Romanticism Date: 1812 Medium: Oil on Canvas Significance:

Honore Daumier
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Title: Rue Transnonain Period: Realism Date: 1834 Medium: Lithograph Significance: to show the brutality of the French government while dealing with the working class, dedicating much of his life and art to social realism.

NicephoreNiepce
‡ Title: View From a window at Le Gras ‡ Period: French Photography ‡ Date: 1826 ‡ Medium: tinplate ‡ Significance: was the first successful permanent photograph.

AdolpheMenzel
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Title: The Balcony Room Period: Realism Date: 1845 Medium: Oil on cardboard Significance: It is spare, light, seemingly un-composed, unevenly finished, spatially ambiguous, and entirely devoid of any sort of moral, religious, historical, allegorical, or narrative content.

William Holman Hunt
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Title: The Awakening Conscience Period: Pre-raphaelite Date: 1853 Medium: Oil on Canvas Significance: The Awakening Conscience is a fine example of popular Victorian painting. It tells a story.

Gustave Courbet
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Title: The Grain Sifters Period: Realism Date: 1855 Medium: Oil on canvas Significance:

AkatieAkpele Kendo
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Title: Agoje! (Gu, the war-God) Period: Africa/Dahomey Kingdom Date: 1859 Medium: Iron Significance: Seems to echo the look of the Plaster of the plaster saints that adorned there chapels.

EdouardManet
‡ Title: Le Dejeuner surl herbe ‡ Period: Realism ‡ Date: 1863 ‡ Medium: Oil on Canvas ‡ Significance: Show the active spirit of independence in impressionism

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